James Wyatt
Overview
 
James Wyatt RA
Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and...

 (August 3, 1746 – September 4, 1813), was an English
England
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west; the Irish Sea is to the north west, the Celtic Sea to the south west, with the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south separating it from continental...

 architect
Architect
An architect is a person trained in the planning, design and oversight of the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to offer or render services in connection with the design and construction of a building, or group of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the...

, a rival of Robert Adam
Robert Adam
Robert Adam was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He was the son of William Adam , Scotland's foremost architect of the time, and trained under him...

 in the neoclassical
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome...

 style, who far outdid Adam in his work in the neo-Gothic style.
Wyatt spent six years in Italy
Italy
Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

, 1762–1768, in company with Richard Bagot of Staffordshire, who was Secretary to the Earl of Northampton's embassy to the Venetian Republic. In Venice
Venice
Venice is a city in northern Italy which is renowned for the beauty of its setting, its architecture and its artworks. It is the capital of the Veneto region...

, Wyatt studied with Antonio Visentini
Antonio Visentini
thumb|220px|View of Piazza San Marco in Venice, by Antonio Visentini .Antonio Visentini was an Italian architectural designer, painter and engraver, known for his architectural fantasies and capricci, the author of treatises on perspective and professor at the Venetian Academy...

 (1688–1782) as an architectural draughtsman and painter.
Discussions
Encyclopedia
James Wyatt RA
Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and...

 (August 3, 1746 – September 4, 1813), was an English
England
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west; the Irish Sea is to the north west, the Celtic Sea to the south west, with the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south separating it from continental...

 architect
Architect
An architect is a person trained in the planning, design and oversight of the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to offer or render services in connection with the design and construction of a building, or group of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the...

, a rival of Robert Adam
Robert Adam
Robert Adam was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He was the son of William Adam , Scotland's foremost architect of the time, and trained under him...

 in the neoclassical
Neoclassicism
Neoclassicism is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome...

 style, who far outdid Adam in his work in the neo-Gothic style.

Early classical career

Wyatt spent six years in Italy
Italy
Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

, 1762–1768, in company with Richard Bagot of Staffordshire, who was Secretary to the Earl of Northampton's embassy to the Venetian Republic. In Venice
Venice
Venice is a city in northern Italy which is renowned for the beauty of its setting, its architecture and its artworks. It is the capital of the Veneto region...

, Wyatt studied with Antonio Visentini
Antonio Visentini
thumb|220px|View of Piazza San Marco in Venice, by Antonio Visentini .Antonio Visentini was an Italian architectural designer, painter and engraver, known for his architectural fantasies and capricci, the author of treatises on perspective and professor at the Venetian Academy...

 (1688–1782) as an architectural draughtsman and painter. In Rome
Rome
Rome is the capital of Italy and the country's largest and most populated city and comune, with over 2.7 million residents in . The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber River within the Lazio region of Italy.Rome's history spans two and a half...

 he made measured drawings of the dome of St. Peter's Basilica
St. Peter's Basilica
The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter , officially known in Italian as ' and commonly known as Saint Peter's Basilica, is a Late Renaissance church located within the Vatican City. Saint Peter's Basilica has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world...

, "being under the necessity of lying on his back on a ladder slung horizontally, without cradle or side-rail, over a frightful void of 300 feet".

Back in England, his selection as architect of the proposed Pantheon or "Winter Ranelagh" in Oxford Street
Oxford Street
Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster in the West End of London, United Kingdom. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, as well as its most dense, and currently has approximately 300 shops. The street was formerly part of the London-Oxford road which began at Newgate,...

, London brought him almost unparalleled instant success. His brother Samuel
Samuel Wyatt
Samuel Wyatt was an English architect and engineer. A member of the Wyatt family, which included several notable 18th and 19th century English architects, his work was primarily in a neoclassical style.-Career:...

 was one of the principal promoters of the scheme, and it was doubtless due to him that the designs of a young and almost unknown architect were accepted by the Committee. When the Pantheon was opened in 1772, their choice was at once endorsed by the fashionable public: Horace Walpole pronounced it to be "the most beautiful edifice in England".

Externally it was unremarkable (illustration, right), but the classicising domed hall surrounded by galleried aisles and apsidal ends, was something new in assembly rooms, and brought its architect immediate celebrity. The design was exhibited at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and...

, private commissions followed, and at the age of 26 Wyatt found himself a fashionable domestic architect and an Associate of the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and...

. His polished manners secured him friends as well as patrons among the great, and when it was rumoured that he was about to leave the country to become architect to Catherine II of Russia
Catherine II of Russia
Catherine II, also known as Catherine the Great , Empress of Russia, was born in Stettin, Pomerania, Prussia on as Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg...

, a group of English noblemen is said to have offered him a retaining fee of £1,200 to remain in their service. His major neoclassical country houses include Heaton Hall near Manchester
Manchester
Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. According to the Office for National Statistics, the 2010 mid-year population estimate for Manchester was 498,800. Manchester lies within one of the UK's largest metropolitan areas, the metropolitan county of Greater...

 (1772), Heveningham Hall
Heveningham Hall
Heveningham Hall is a Grade I listed building in Heveningham, Suffolk that was built in 1780. The east wing was gutted by fire in June 1984.The hall and grounds were bought in 1994 by Foxtons-founder Jon Hunt and his wife for use as a family home...

 in Suffolk
Suffolk
Suffolk is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in East Anglia, England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east...

 (circa 1788-99), and Castle Coole
Castle Coole
Castle Coole is a townland and a late-18th-century neo-classical mansion situated in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.Set in a 1200 acre wooded estate, it is one of three properties owned and managed by the National Trust in County Fermanagh, the others being Florence Court and the...

 in Ireland
Ireland
Ireland is an island to the northwest of continental Europe. It is the third-largest island in Europe and the twentieth-largest island on Earth...

, as well as Packington Hall in Staffordshire, the home of the Levett
Levett
Levett is an Anglo-Norman territorial surname deriving from the village of Livet-en-Ouche, now Jonquerets-de-Livet, in Eure, Normandy. Ancestors of the earliest Levett family in England, the de Livets were lords of the village of Livet, and undertenants of the de Ferrers, among the most powerful of...

 family for generations, and Dodington Park
Dodington Park
Dodington Park is a country house and estate in Dodington, Gloucestershire, England.The Codrington family acquired the estate in the late 16th century, when there was a large gables Elizabethan house and adjoining church...

 in Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean....

 for the Codrington family.

Later classical work

In later years, he carried out alterations at Frogmore
Frogmore
The Frogmore Estate or Gardens comprise of private gardens within the grounds of the Home Park, adjoining Windsor Castle, in the English county of Berkshire. The name derives from the preponderance of frogs which have always lived in this low-lying and marshy area.It is the location of Frogmore...

 for Queen Charlotte, and was made Surveyor-General of the Works. In about 1800, he was commissioned to carry out alterations to Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle is a medieval castle and royal residence in Windsor in the English county of Berkshire, notable for its long association with the British royal family and its architecture. The original castle was built after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I it...

 which would probably have been much more considerable had it not been for the King's illness, and in 1802 he designed for the King the "strange castellated palace
Kew Palace
Kew Palace is a British Royal Palace in Kew Gardens on the banks of the Thames up river from London. There have been at least four Palaces at Kew, and three have been known as Kew Palace; the first building may not have been known as Kew as no records survive other than the words of another...

" at Kew
Kew
Kew is a place in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in South West London. Kew is best known for being the location of the Royal Botanic Gardens, now a World Heritage Site, which includes Kew Palace...

 which was remarkable for the extensive employment of cast iron
Cast iron
Cast iron is derived from pig iron, and while it usually refers to gray iron, it also identifies a large group of ferrous alloys which solidify with a eutectic. The color of a fractured surface can be used to identify an alloy. White cast iron is named after its white surface when fractured, due...

 in its construction.

Between 1805 and 1808 Wyatt remodelled West Dean House in West Dean, West Sussex
West Dean, West Sussex
West Dean is a village and civil parish in the District of Chichester in West Sussex, England located north of Chichester on the A286 road just west of Singleton. The parish includes the hamlets of Binderton and Chilgrove....

. Wyatt’s work was remarkable because it is built entirely of flint, even to the door and window openings, which would normally be lined with stone.

In 1776, Wyatt succeeded Henry Keene
Henry Keene
Henry Keene was an English architect, notable for designing buildings in the Gothic Revival and Neoclassical style.- Life and work :...

 as Surveyor to Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English,...

 (in which year he was appointed Elizabeth, Countess of Home
Elizabeth, Countess of Home
Elizabeth, Countess of Home was the wife of William Home, 8th Earl of Home. She had been born in Jamaica to William Gibbons, a wealthy West Indies merchant and his wife of Vere. She first married James Lawes, son of Nicholas Lawes, the island's governor. She inherited a great fortune on her...

's architect on Home House
Home House
Home House is a Georgian town house at 20 Portman Square, London. James Wyatt was appointed to design it by Elizabeth, Countess of Home in 1776, but by 1777 he had been sacked and replaced by Robert Adam. Elizabeth left the completed house on her death in 1784 to her nephew William Gale, who in...

, though he was sacked and replaced by Robert Adam a year later). In 1782 or 1783 he became, in addition, Surveyor of the Ordnance. The death of Sir William Chambers
William Chambers (architect)
Sir William Chambers was a Scottish architect, born in Gothenburg, Sweden, where his father was a merchant. Between 1740 and 1749 he was employed by the Swedish East India Company making several voyages to China where he studied Chinese architecture and decoration.Returning to Europe, he studied...

 brought him the post of Surveyor General and Comptroller of the Works
Office of Works
The Office of Works was established in the English Royal household in 1378 to oversee the building of the royal castles and residences. In 1832 it became the Works Department within the Office of Woods, Forests, Land Revenues, Works and Buildings...

 in 1796.
Wyatt was now the principal architect of the day, the recipient of more commissions than he could well fulfil. His widespread practice and the duties of his official posts left him little time to give proper attention to the individual needs of his clients. As early as 1790, when he was invited to submit designs for rebuilding St Chad's Church at Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury is the county town of Shropshire, in the West Midlands region of England. Lying on the River Severn, it is a civil parish home to some 70,000 inhabitants, and is the primary settlement and headquarters of Shropshire Council...

, he broke his engagements with such frequency that the committee "became at length offended, and addressed themselves to Mr. George Stewart
George Stewart
George Stewart may refer to:*George E. Stewart, Philippine-American War Medal of Honor recipient*George F. Stewart , American food scientist*George Francis Stewart , Irish land agent...

". In 1804, Jeffry Wyatt told Farington that his uncle had lost "many great commissions" by such neglect. When approached by a new client, he would at first take the keenest interest in the commission, but when the work was about to begin he would lose interest in it and "employ himself upon trifling professional matters which others could do". His conduct of official business was no better than his treatment of his private clients, and there can be no doubt that it was Wyatt's irresponsible habits which led to the reorganization of the Board of Works after his death, as a result of which the Surveyor's office was placed in the hands of a political chief assisted by three "attached architects".

Wyatt was a brilliant but facile designer, whose work is not characterized by any markedly individual style. At the time he began practice the fashionable architects were the brothers Adam, whose style of interior decoration he proceeded to imitate with such success that they complained of plagiarism in the introduction to their Works in Architecture, which appeared in 1773. Many years later Wyatt himself told George III that "there had been no regular architecture since Sir William Chambers – that when he came from Italy he found the public taste corrupted by the Adams, and he was obliged to comply with it". Much of Wyatt's classical work is, in fact, in a chastened Adam manner with ornaments in Coade stone
Coade stone
Lithodipyra , or Coade stone, was ceramic stoneware that was often described as an artificial stone in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It was used for moulding Neoclassical statues, architectural decorations and garden ornaments that were both of the highest quality and remain virtually...

 and "Etruscan
Etruscan civilization
Etruscan civilization is the modern English name given to a civilization of ancient Italy in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany. The ancient Romans called its creators the Tusci or Etrusci...

" medallions executed in many cases by the painter Biagio Rebecca
Biagio Rebecca
Biagio Rebecca was an Italian painter, active mainly as a fresco decorator in England. Born in Rome, his apprenticeship is unknown. In England, he was known for neoclassical scenes from mythology, often collaborating with Robert Adam for example at Harewood House and at Kedleston Hall. He also...

, who was also employed by his rivals. It was not until towards the end of his life that he and his brother Samuel (with whom must be associated their nephew Lewis) developed the severe and fastidious style of domestic architecture which is characteristic of the Wyatt manner at its best. (1) But among Wyatt's earlier works there are several (e.g., the Christ Church gateway and the mausoleum at Cobham
Cobham, Kent
Cobham is a village and civil parish in the Gravesham District of Kent, England. It is located south of Watling Street, the old road from Dover to London, six miles south-east of Gravesend. The hamlet of Sole Street lies within the parish, which covers an area of 1,240 ha and has a population of...

) which show a familiarity with Chambers Treatise on the Decorative Part of Civil Architecture, and so permit the belief that if his artistic integrity had been greater Wyatt might have continued the Chambers tradition instead of falling in with the "corrupt taste" of the brothers Adam. Had he been given the opportunity of designing some great public building, it is possible that he would have shown himself a true disciple of Chambers; (2) but his career as a government architect coincided with the Napoleonic wars, and his premature death deprived him of participation in the metropolitan improvements of the reign of George IV
George IV of the United Kingdom
George IV was the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and also of Hanover from the death of his father, George III, on 29 January 1820 until his own death ten years later...

.

Gothic architecture

Meanwhile, Wyatt's reputation as a rival to Robert Adam
Robert Adam
Robert Adam was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He was the son of William Adam , Scotland's foremost architect of the time, and trained under him...

 had been eclipsed by his celebrity as a Gothic
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture is a style of architecture that flourished during the high and late medieval period. It evolved from Romanesque architecture and was succeeded by Renaissance architecture....

 architect. Every Georgian
Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1720 and 1840. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover—George I of Great Britain, George II of Great Britain, George III of the United...

 architect was called upon from time to time to produce designs in the medieval style, and Wyatt was by no means the first in the field. However, whereas his predecessors had merely Gothicized their elevations by the addition of battlements and pointed windows, Wyatt went further and exploited to the full the picturesque qualities of medieval architecture by irregular grouping and the addition of towers and spires to his silhouettes. Never, indeed, have the romantic possibilities of Gothic architecture been more strikingly demonstrated than they were by Wyatt at Fonthill Abbey
Fonthill Abbey
Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckford's Folly — was a large Gothic revival country house built around the turn of the 19th century at Fonthill Gifford in Wiltshire, England, at the direction of William Thomas Beckford and architect James Wyatt...

 and Ashridge
Ashridge
Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, about two miles north of Berkhamsted and twenty miles north west of...

; and although crude in scale and often unscholarly in detail, these houses are among the landmarks of the Gothic revival in England. In his lifetime Wyatt enjoyed the reputation of having "revived in this country the long forgotten beauties of Gothic architecture", but the real importance of his Gothic work lay in the manner in which it bridged the gap between the rococo Gothic of the mid 18h century and the serious medievalism of the early 19th century.
Of his cathedral restorations, inspired as they were by the mistaken idea that a medieval church ought to be homogeneous in style and unencumbered by screens, monuments, and other obtrusive relics of the past, it can only be said that the Chapters who employed him were no more enlightened than their architect, and that at Westminster Abbey at least he accomplished an urgent work of repair in an unexceptionable manner. His activities at Salisbury, Durham, Hereford, and Lichfield were bitterly criticized by John Carter
John Carter (architect)
-Life:Carter was the son of Benjamin Carter, a marble-carver established in Piccadilly, and was born on 22 June 1748. At an early age he was sent to a boarding-school at Battersea, and then to one in Kennington Lane. Leaving school aged about twelve, he went home to his father, making working...

 in his Pursuits of Architectural Innovation, and it was due in large measure to Carter's persistent denunciation that, in 1796, Wyatt failed to secure election as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries
Society of Antiquaries of London
The Society of Antiquaries of London is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'." It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London , and is...

. In the following year, however, he was permitted to add F.S.A. to his name by a majority of one hundred and twenty-three votes.

Wyatt was elected to the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London. The Royal Academy of Arts has a unique position in being an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects whose purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and...

 in 1785, and took an active part in the politics of the Academy. In 1803 he was one of the members of the Council which attempted to assert its independence of the General Assembly of Academicians, and when the resultant dissensions led West to resign the Presidency in the following year, it was Wyatt who was elected to take his place. But his election was never formally approved by the King, and in the following year he appears to have acquiesced in West's resumption of office. Wyatt was one of the founders of the Architects' Club in 1791, and sometimes presided at its meetings at the Thatched House Tavern.

In 1802 Wyatt built a new house for the 7th Earl of Bridgewater on the Ashridge
Ashridge
Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, about two miles north of Berkhamsted and twenty miles north west of...

 estate in Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in the East region of England. The county town is Hertford.The county is one of the Home Counties and lies inland, bordered by Greater London , Buckinghamshire , Bedfordshire , Cambridgeshire and...

 which is now a Grade 1 listed building. In 1803 Thomas Johnes
Thomas Johnes
Thomas Johnes , born in Ludlow, Shropshire, England was a Member of Parliament, landscape architect, farmer, printer, writer and social benefactor...

 hired Wyatt to design Saint Michel's Hafod
Hafod Uchtryd
The estate of Hafod Uchtryd is located in Ceredigion, Wales in the Ystwyth valley near Devil's Bridge, Cwmystwyth and Pont-rhyd-y-groes off the B4574 road, described by the Automobile Association as one of the ten most scenic drives in the world. It is the ancient location of a dwelling on the...

 Church, Eglwys Newydd, in Ceredigion
Ceredigion
Ceredigion is a county and former kingdom in mid-west Wales. As Cardiganshire , it was created in 1282, and was reconstituted as a county under that name in 1996, reverting to Ceredigion a day later...

, Wales
Wales
Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain, bordered by England to its east and the Atlantic Ocean and Irish Sea to its west. It has a population of three million, and a total area of 20,779 km²...

.

Death

He died on September 4, 1813, as the result of an accident to the carriage in which he was travelling over the Marlborough Downs with his friend and employer, Christopher Codrington
Christopher Codrington
Christopher Codrington , British soldier, bibliophile and colonial governor, was born on the island of Barbados, West Indies, in 1668...

 of Dodington Park
Dodington Park
Dodington Park is a country house and estate in Dodington, Gloucestershire, England.The Codrington family acquired the estate in the late 16th century, when there was a large gables Elizabethan house and adjoining church...

. He was buried in Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English,...

; he left a widow and four sons, of whom the eldest, Benjamin Dean
Benjamin Dean Wyatt
Benjamin Dean Wyatt was an English architect. He was the son and pupil of the architect James Wyatt, and the brother of Matthew Cotes Wyatt....

, and the youngest, Philip
Philip Wyatt
Philip William Wyatt was an English architect, the youngest son of the architect James Wyatt nephew of Samuel Wyatt, cousin to Sir Jeffry Wyattville....

, were notable architects. Matthew Cotes
Matthew Cotes Wyatt
Matthew Cotes Wyatt was a painter and sculptor and a member of the Wyatt family, who were well-known in the Victorian era as architects and sculptors.-Early life:...

 (1777–1862), the second son, became a well-known sculptor, whose best work is the bronze statue of George III in Cockspur Street off Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square is a public space and tourist attraction in central London, England, United Kingdom. At its centre is Nelson's Column, which is guarded by four lion statues at its base. There are a number of statues and sculptures in the square, with one plinth displaying changing pieces of...

. Charles, the third son, was for a time in the service of the East India Company
British East India Company
The East India Company was an early English joint-stock company that was formed initially for pursuing trade with the East Indies, but that ended up trading mainly with the Indian subcontinent and China...

 at Calcutta, but returned to England in 1801. Nothing is known of his later career.

Public buildings

  • The Pantheon, Oxford St, London 1770-2
  • Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church or house of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is one of the largest constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England...

    , north & east sides of the Canterbury Quad including the gate 1773-83
  • Radcliffe Observatory
    Radcliffe Observatory
    Radcliffe Observatory was the astronomical observatory of Oxford University from 1773 until 1934, when the Radcliffe Trustees sold it and erected a new observatory in Pretoria, South Africa. It is a grade I listed building.- History :...

    , Oxford, 1776–94
  • Brasenose College, Oxford
    Brasenose College, Oxford
    Brasenose College, originally Brazen Nose College , is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. As of 2006, it has an estimated financial endowment of £98m...

    , redecorated the Library 1779-80
  • Holywell Music Room
    Holywell Music Room
    The Holywell Music Room is the city of Oxford's chamber music hall, situated in Holywell Street in the city centre, attached to Wadham College. It is said to be the oldest, purpose built music room in Europe, and hence England's first concert hall....

    , Oxford, remodelled interior 1780
  • The Assembly Rooms, Chichester, Sussex, 1783
  • Worcester College, Oxford
    Worcester College, Oxford
    Worcester College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in the eighteenth century, but its predecessor on the same site had been an institution of learning since the late thirteenth century...

    , interiors of the Chapel & Hall 1783, the Chapel was redecorated by William Burges
  • Oriel College, Oxford, the Library and alterations to the Provost's rooms 1788-91
  • Liverpool Town Hall
    Liverpool Town Hall
    Liverpool Town Hall stands in High Street at its junction with Dale Street, Castle Street, and Water Street in Liverpool, Merseyside, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building, described in the National Heritage List for England as "one of the finest...

    , interiors 1783-1813
  • New College, Oxford
    New College, Oxford
    New College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.- Overview :The College's official name, College of St Mary, is the same as that of the older Oriel College; hence, it has been referred to as the "New College of St Mary", and is now almost always...

    , alterations to the Hall, Chapel & Library 1789-94
  • Merton College, Oxford
    Merton College, Oxford
    Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to...

    , rebuilt Hall 1790-4, again rebuilt by Sir George Gilbert Scott
    George Gilbert Scott
    Sir George Gilbert Scott was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses...

     1872-4
  • Lincoln's Inn
    Lincoln's Inn
    The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. Although Lincoln's Inn is able to trace its official records beyond...

    , London, repairs to the chapel roof 1791
  • Balliol College, Oxford
    Balliol College, Oxford
    Balliol College , founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England but founded by a family with strong Scottish connections....

    , rebuilt Hall and redecorated the Library 1792
  • Magdalen College, Oxford
    Magdalen College, Oxford
    Magdalen College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. As of 2006 the college had an estimated financial endowment of £153 million. Magdalen is currently top of the Norrington Table after over half of its 2010 finalists received first-class degrees, a record...

    , alterations to the Hall & Chapel 1792-5
  • Royal Military Academy, Woolwich 1796-1805
  • Royal Artillery Barracks
    Royal Artillery Barracks
    The Royal Artillery Barracks at Woolwich in South East London is the "home" of the Royal Artillery. It is famous for having the longest continuous building facade in the UK as well as for having the largest parade square of any UK barracks.-History:...

    , Woolwich 1796-7
  • Palace of Westminster
    Palace of Westminster
    The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, is the meeting place of the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom—the House of Lords and the House of Commons...

    , restoration of the House of Lords 1800-13, burnt 1834
  • The Town Hall, Ripon
    Ripon
    Ripon is a cathedral city, market town and successor parish in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England, located at the confluence of two streams of the River Ure in the form of the Laver and Skell. The city is noted for its main feature the Ripon Cathedral which is architecturally...

    , Yorkshire 1801
  • The King's Bench Prison
    King's Bench Prison
    The King's Bench Prison was a prison in Southwark, south London, from medieval times until it closed in 1880. It took its name from the King's Bench court of law in which cases of defamation, bankruptcy and other misdemeanours were heard; as such, the prison was often used as a debtor's prison...

    , London, restoration and alterations 1803-4, demolished
  • The Marshalsea
    Marshalsea
    The Marshalsea was a prison on the south bank of the River Thames in Southwark, now part of London. From the 14th century until it closed in 1842, it housed men under court martial for crimes at sea, including those accused of "unnatural crimes", political figures and intellectuals accused of...

     Prison, London, restoration and alterations 1803-5, demolished
  • The Naval Arsenal, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk 1806, demolished 1829
  • The Armoury, Shrewsbury 1806
  • The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst
    Royal Military Academy Sandhurst
    The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst , commonly known simply as Sandhurst, is a British Army officer initial training centre located in Sandhurst, Berkshire, England...

    , Berkshire 1807-12 executed by John Sanders
    John Sanders (architect)
    John Sanders was an architect and the first pupil of Sir John Soane. Sanders was born on 12 April, 1768, the son of Thomas Sanders, a tallow-chandler of the parish of St Dunstan-in-the-East, London...

     who modified the design, most notably using Greek Doric for the portico
  • Dorset House, Whitehall, London, adaptation as government offices 1808, demolished
  • The Market Cross, Devizes
    Devizes
    Devizes is a market town and civil parish in Wiltshire, England. The town is about southeast of Chippenham and about east of Trowbridge.Devizes serves as a centre for banks, solicitors and shops, with a large open market place where a market is held once a week...

    , Wiltshire 1814


Churches

  • St. James Church, in the planned community of Milton Abbas
    Milton Abbas
    Milton Abbas is a village in Dorset in the south-west of England, approximately seven miles south-west of the market town of Blandford Forum and 11 miles north-east of Dorchester. The village has a population of 766...

    , Dorset
    Dorset
    Dorset , is a county in South West England on the English Channel coast. The county town is Dorchester which is situated in the south. The Hampshire towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch joined the county with the reorganisation of local government in 1974...

    , 1774–86
  • St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    St George's Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England, United Kingdom. It is both a royal peculiar and the chapel of the Order of the Garter...

    , alterations 1787-1790
  • Salisbury Cathedral
    Salisbury Cathedral
    Salisbury Cathedral, formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples of Early English architecture....

    , restoration work 1787-93
  • St. Peter's Church, Manchester 1788-94, demolished
  • Lichfield Cathedral
    Lichfield Cathedral
    Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The Diocese of Lichfield covers all of Staffordshire, much of Shropshire and part of the Black Country and West Midlands...

    , restoration 1788-95
  • Hereford Cathedral
    Hereford Cathedral
    The current Hereford Cathedral, located at Hereford in England, dates from 1079. Its most famous treasure is Mappa Mundi, a mediæval map of the world dating from the 13th century. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building.-Origins:...

    , restoration 1788-97
  • Milton Abbey
    Milton Abbey
    Milton Abbey School is a British independent school in the Dorset countryside. It has 227 pupils in six boarding Houses, called Athelstan, Bancks, Damer, Hambro, Middleton and Tregonwell. Founded in 1954, it welcomes boys from 13 to 16 years and is coeducational in the sixth form.The school has a...

    , Dorset, restored Abbey church 1789-91
  • East Grinstead
    East Grinstead
    East Grinstead is a town and civil parish in the northeastern corner of Mid Sussex, West Sussex in England near the East Sussex, Surrey, and Kent borders. It lies south of London, north northeast of Brighton, and east northeast of the county town of Chichester...

     Church, Sussex 1789-1813
  • Durham Cathedral
    Durham Cathedral
    The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham is a cathedral in the city of Durham, England, the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Durham. The Bishopric dates from 995, with the present cathedral being founded in AD 1093...

    , restoration 1795-6
  • St. Kea Church
    Kea, Cornwall
    Kea is a civil parish and village in Cornwall, United Kingdom. It is a "large straggling parish" in a former mining area south of Truro.Kea village is situated just over one mile southwest of Truro....

    , Cornwall 1802 demolished 1895
  • Westminster Abbey
    Westminster Abbey
    The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English,...

    , London, restoration work 1803
  • Hafod Church, Caernarvonshire 1803, burnt down 1931
  • Weeford
    Weeford
    Weeford is a village and civil parish located in the Lichfield District of Staffordshire in England. It has a population of 202.The name Weeford is believed to come from the Old English Wēohford or Wēoford, and to mean "Holy ford", or "ford by a heathen temple".The medieval church is dedicated to...

     Church, Staffordshire 1803
  • Henry VII Lady Chapel
    Henry VII Lady Chapel
    The Henry VII Lady Chapel, now more often known just as the Henry VII Chapel, is a large Lady chapel at the far eastern end of Westminster Abbey, paid for by the will of Henry VII. It is separated from the rest of the abbey by brass gates and a flight of stairs.The structure of the chapel is a...

    , Westminster Abbey, restoration 1807-13
  • Hanworth
    Hanworth
    Hanworth lies to the south east of Feltham in the London Borough of Hounslow. The name is thought to come from the Anglo Saxon words “haen” and “worth”, meaning “small homestead”....

     Church, Middlesex 1808-13, rebuilt 1865


London houses

  • 11-15 Portman Square
    Portman Square
    Portman Square is a square in London, part of the Portman Estate. It is located at the western end of Wigmore Street, which connects it to Cavendish Square to its east. It is served by London bus route 274...

    , London 1774
  • House, Grosvenor Square
    Grosvenor Square
    Grosvenor Square is a large garden square in the exclusive Mayfair district of London, England. It is the centrepiece of the Mayfair property of the Duke of Westminster, and takes its name from their surname, "Grosvenor".-History:...

     London 1778-9
  • 9 Conduit Street, London 1779
  • Richmond House, London, addition of two rooms and staircase 1782, burnt down 1791
  • 1 Foley Place, London, 1783, James Wyatt's own house, demolished 1925
  • Lichfield House, 15 St. James Square, London, alterations to the drawing room 1791-4
  • Montague House, 22 Portman Square, London, additions 1793, bombed in Blitz 1940
  • Queen's House (Buckingham Palace), London, alterations, rebuilt by John Nash 1825-1830
  • 22 St. James Square, London 1803
  • Old Palace Kew
    Kew Palace
    Kew Palace is a British Royal Palace in Kew Gardens on the banks of the Thames up river from London. There have been at least four Palaces at Kew, and three have been known as Kew Palace; the first building may not have been known as Kew as no records survive other than the words of another...

    , London, repairs 1802-11
  • New Palace Kew, London 1802-11 never completed owing to George III's insanity
    George III of the United Kingdom
    George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of these two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death...

    , demolished 1827-8
  • Devonshire House
    Devonshire House
    Devonshire House in Piccadilly was the London residence of the Dukes of Devonshire in the 18th and 19th centuries. It was built for William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire in the Palladian style, to designs by William Kent...

    , London, the crystal staircase 1811-12, demolished 1924
  • Carlton House, London, refitted library 1812, demolished

New country houses

  • Gaddesden Place
    Gaddesden Place
    Gaddesden Place, near Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire, England, was designed by architect James Wyatt and built between 1768 and 1773, and was the home of the noted Hertfordshire Halsey family....

    , Hertfordshire 1768-73
  • Heaton Hall
    Heaton Park
    Heaton Park, covering an area variously reported as , 247 hectares, , over and is the biggest park in Greater Manchester, England and one of the biggest municipal parks in Europe. The park comprises the grounds of a Grade I listed, neoclassical 18th century country house, Heaton Hall...

    , Lancashire, 1772
  • Sheffield Park
    Sheffield Park Garden
    Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its owner, Arthur G. Soames. It is now owned by the...

    , Sussex, 1776
  • Bryanston House
    Bryanston School
    Bryanston School is a co-educational independent school for both day and boarding pupils in Blandford, north Dorset, England, near the village of Bryanston. It was founded in 1928...

    , Dorset, 1778 rebuilt by Richard Norman Shaw
    Richard Norman Shaw
    Richard Norman Shaw RA , was an influential Scottish architect from the 1870s to the 1900s, known for his country houses and for commercial buildings.-Life:...

     1890
  • Hothfield Place, Kent 1778-80, demolished 1954
  • Badger Hall, Shropshire 1779-83 demolished 1952
  • Roundway House, Wiltshire 1780
  • Fornham Hall, Suffolk, 1781-2 demolished 1951
  • Lee Priory, Kent, 1782–90, demolished 1954, a room survives in the V&A Museum
  • New Park, Devizes, Wiltshire 1783
  • Sudbourne Hall, Suffolk 1784, later extended and remodelled
  • Sunningdale Park
    Sunningdale Park
    Sunningdale Park is a meeting and conference venue in Sunningdale, Berkshire that is run by De Vere Venues.In grounds of there is a Grade II listed neo-georgian mansion called Northcote House which was built in 1930 and in which notable features include the grand staircase and front portico...

    , Berkshire 1785, rebuilt
  • Wynnstay House
    Wynnstay
    Wynnstay was a famous estate in Wales, the family seat of the Wynns. It is located at Ruabon, near Wrexham.During the 17th century, Sir John Wynn, 5th Baronet inherited the Watstay Estate through his marriage to Jane Evans , and renamed it the Wynnstay Estate...

    , Denbighshire, 1785-8 rebuilt in the 19th century
  • Stanstead Park, Sussex, 1786-91 rebuilt in 1900
  • Sufton Court, Herefordshire 1788
  • Ammerdown House, Kilmersdon
    Ammerdown House, Kilmersdon
    Ammerdown House in Kilmersdon, Somerset, England was built in 1788. It has been designated as Grade I listed building.It was built as a country house with stables and an adjacent formal garden within landscaped parkland in emparked landscape by James Wyatt for Thomas Samuel Jolliffe...

    , Somerset 1788
  • Gresford House, Denbighshire c.1790
  • Hartham Park
    Hartham Park
    Hartham Park is a Georgian manor house, located in Hartham near Corsham, Wiltshire. Originally designed by James Wyatt, set today in it contains one of three remaining stické tennis courts in the world...

    , Wiltshire 1790-5
  • Castle Coole
    Castle Coole
    Castle Coole is a townland and a late-18th-century neo-classical mansion situated in Enniskillen, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.Set in a 1200 acre wooded estate, it is one of three properties owned and managed by the National Trust in County Fermanagh, the others being Florence Court and the...

    , County Fermanagh
    County Fermanagh
    Fermanagh District Council is the only one of the 26 district councils in Northern Ireland that contains all of the county it is named after. The district council also contains a small section of County Tyrone in the Dromore and Kilskeery road areas....

     1790-8
  • Frogmore House
    Frogmore House
    Frogmore House is a 17th-century country house standing at the centre of the Frogmore Estate, amongst beautiful gardens, about a half a mile south of Windsor Castle in the Home Park at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. It is a Grade I listed building.-Early tenants:The original house on...

    , Berkshire 1792
  • Sundridge
    Sundridge, Kent
    Sundridge is a village within the civil parish of Sundridge with Ide Hill, in the Sevenoaks District of Kent, England. The village is located on the A25 road to the east of WesterhamIts church is dedicated to St Mary....

     Park, Kent, 1792-5, finished by John Nash
    John Nash (architect)
    John Nash was a British architect responsible for much of the layout of Regency London.-Biography:Born in Lambeth, London, the son of a Welsh millwright, Nash trained with the architect Sir Robert Taylor. He established his own practice in 1777, but his career was initially unsuccessful and...

  • Henham Hall, Suffolk 1793-7 demolished 1953
  • Purley Park, Berkshire 1795
  • Bowden House, Wiltshire, 1796
  • Fonthill Abbey
    Fonthill Abbey
    Fonthill Abbey — also known as Beckford's Folly — was a large Gothic revival country house built around the turn of the 19th century at Fonthill Gifford in Wiltshire, England, at the direction of William Thomas Beckford and architect James Wyatt...

    , Wiltshire 1796-1813
  • Trentham Hall, Staffordshire 1797, remodelled by Sir Charles Barry
    Charles Barry
    Sir Charles Barry FRS was an English architect, best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster in London during the mid-19th century, but also responsible for numerous other buildings and gardens.- Background and training :Born on 23 May 1795 in Bridge Street, Westminster...

     demolished c.1909
  • Stoke Poges Park
    Stoke Park Club
    Stoke Park is a historic estate in Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire. The Mansion is located amongst of parkland, lakes, historic gardens and monuments. The site is now a hotel, spa and country club....

    , Buckinghamshire, 1797–1802
  • Wycombe Abbey
    Wycombe Abbey
    Wycombe Abbey is an independent girls' boarding school situated in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. It is academically one of the top schools in the United Kingdom, and the top girls' boarding school...

    , Buckinghamshire c.1798
  • Dodington Park
    Dodington Park
    Dodington Park is a country house and estate in Dodington, Gloucestershire, England.The Codrington family acquired the estate in the late 16th century, when there was a large gables Elizabethan house and adjoining church...

    , Gloucestershire 1798-1808
  • Norris Castle
    Norris Castle
    Norris Castle is located on the Isle of Wight and can be seen from the Solent standing on the northeast point of East Cowes. The castle was designed by James Wyatt for Lord Henry Seymour. It has a galleted facade with crenellations, but all of this is for show as the castle has no defensive...

    , Isle of Wight 1799
  • Pennsylvania Castle, Dorset 1800
  • Cranbourne Lodge, Windsor great Park 1800 demolished 1830
  • Nacton House, Suffolk 1801
  • Belvoir Castle
    Belvoir Castle
    Belvoir Castle is a stately home in the English county of Leicestershire, overlooking the Vale of Belvoir . It is a Grade I listed building....

    , Leicestershire 1801-13, work continued under Rev. T. Thornton after Wyatt's death
  • Roehampton Grove, Surrey 1804, enlarged 1890
  • West Dean Park
    West Dean House
    West Dean House is a large flint-faced manor house situated in West Dean, West Sussex, near the historic City of Chichester. This country estate has approximately of land and dates back to 1086, with various royal connections throughout the years...

    , Sussex, 1804 enlarged 1893
  • Ashridge
    Ashridge
    Ashridge is an estate and house in Hertfordshire, England; part of the land stretches into Buckinghamshire and it is close to the Bedfordshire border. It is situated in the Chiltern Hills, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, about two miles north of Berkhamsted and twenty miles north west of...

    , Hertfordshire 1808-13, completed by his nephew Sir Jeffry Wyatville after Wyatt's death
  • House at Streatham Surrey 1810
  • Elvaston Castle
    Elvaston Castle
    Elvaston Castle is a country park in Elvaston, Derbyshire, England with of woodlands, parkland and formal gardens. The centrepiece of the estate is Elvaston Castle itself. The castle is a Grade II* listed building but as at 2008 is regarded as a Building at Risk.-History:In the 16th century the...

    , Derbyshire 1812


Garden buildings & follies

  • Folly Temple Island
    Temple Island
    Temple Island is an island in the River Thames in England just north of Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. The island is on the reach above Hambleden Lock between the Buckinghamshire and Berkshire banks, and is part of Remenham in Berkshire...

     1771
  • Bridge, Chiswick House
    Chiswick House
    Chiswick House is a Palladian villa in Burlington Lane, Chiswick, in the London Borough of Hounslow in England. Set in , the house was completed in 1729 during the reign of George II and designed by Lord Burlington. William Kent , who took a leading role in designing the gardens, created one of the...

     attributed (1774)
  • Cobham Hall, Kent, Darnley Mausoleum
    Darnley Mausoleum
    The Darnley Mausoleum, is a Grade I Listed Building, situated in Cobham Woods, Kent . It was designed by James Wyatt for the 4th Earl of Darnley according to detailed instructions in the will of the 3rd Earl of Darnley. It was never used...

     1783
  • Brocklesby Park, Lincolnshire, the Mausoleum 1787-94
  • Broadway Tower
    Broadway Tower
    Broadway Tower is a folly located on Broadway Hill, A44 between Evesham and Moreton-in-Marsh, one mile south-east of the village of Broadway, Worcestershire, England, at the second highest point of the Cotswolds after Cleeve Hill. Broadway Tower's base is 1,024 feet above sea level. The tower...

    , an isolated folly
    Folly
    In architecture, a folly is a building constructed primarily for decoration, but either suggesting by its appearance some other purpose, or merely so extravagant that it transcends the normal range of garden ornaments or other class of building to which it belongs...

     for Lady Coventry, 1794
  • Peper Harrow, Surrey, a conservatory 1797 demolished c.1913
  • Croome Park
    Croome Park
    Croome is an 18th century landscape park, garden and mansion house in south Worcestershire designed by Lancelot 'Capability' Brown with some features by Robert Adam. The park and garden are owned by the National Trust. The mansion house, Croome Court, was purchased by the Croome Heritage Trust and...

    , Worcestershire, various garden buildings including the Panorama Tower 1801


Alterations to existing country houses

  • Fawley Court
    Fawley Court
    Fawley Court is a country house standing on the banks of the River Thames at Fawley in the English county of Buckinghamshire, just north of Henley-on-Thames. The former deer park extended over the border into Oxfordshire...

    , Oxfordshire, internal alterations 1771
  • Cobham Hall
    Cobham Hall
    Cobham Hall is a country house in Cobham, Kent, England. There has been a manor house on the site since the 12th century. The current building consists of a pair of Tudor wings built for William Brooke, 10th Baron Cobham in the 16th century and a later classical central block, and a kitchen court...

    , Kent, alterations, additions, 1771–81, 1789-93 & 1801-12
  • Crichel House
    Crichel House
    Crichel House is a country house located near the village of Moor Crichel in Dorset, England. It is surrounded by of parkland, which includes a crescent-shaped lake covering ....

    , Dorset, interior alterations 1773
  • Charlton Park, Wiltshire alterations 1774
  • Aubery Hill, Notting Hill, London, alterations 1774
  • Shardeloes
    Shardeloes
    Shardeloes is a large 18th century country house located one mile northwest of Amersham in Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom. . A previous manor house on the site was demolished and the present building constructed between 1758 and 1766 for William Drake, the Member of Parliament for Amersham.-Design...

    , Buckinghamshire, alterations to library, and garden buildings (demolished) 1774
  • Copped Hall
    Copped Hall
    Copped Hall or Copthall is a ruined country house close to Epping in Essex, England, parts of which date from the 16th century. Copped Hall is visible from the M25 motorway between junctions 26 and 27.- History :...

    , Essex redecoration of Library, burnt out in 1917
  • Milton Abbey
    Milton Abbey
    Milton Abbey School is a British independent school in the Dorset countryside. It has 227 pupils in six boarding Houses, called Athelstan, Bancks, Damer, Hambro, Middleton and Tregonwell. Founded in 1954, it welcomes boys from 13 to 16 years and is coeducational in the sixth form.The school has a...

    , Dorset, interior decoration 1775-6
  • Belton House
    Belton House
    Belton House is a Grade I listed country house in Belton near Grantham, Lincolnshire, England. The mansion is surrounded by formal gardens and a series of avenues leading to follies within a larger wooded park...

    , Lincolnshire, Library & Boudoir 1776-7
  • Burton Constable
    Burton Constable
    Burton Constable is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is located approximately north east of Hull city centre and south east of the village of Skirlaugh....

    , Yorkshire, West Drawing Room & Entrance Lodges, 1776-8
  • Heveningham Hall
    Heveningham Hall
    Heveningham Hall is a Grade I listed building in Heveningham, Suffolk that was built in 1780. The east wing was gutted by fire in June 1984.The hall and grounds were bought in 1994 by Foxtons-founder Jon Hunt and his wife for use as a family home...

    , the interiors & orangery, plus the Rectory & Huntingfield Hall (a farm) 1776-84
  • Blagdon Hall
    Blagdon Hall
    Blagdon Hall is a privately owned country mansion near Seaton Burn, Northumberland which has Grade I listed building status.The estate has been in the ownership of the White Ridley family since 1698....

    , Northumberland, internal alterations 1778,Lodges to park 1787 & stables 1789-91
  • Ragley Hall
    Ragley Hall
    Ragley Hall is located south of Alcester, Warwickshire, eight miles west of Stratford-upon-Avon. It is the ancestral seat of the Marquess of Hertford and is one of the stately homes of England.-The present day:...

    , Warwickshire, alterations and interiors 1780
  • Sandleford Priory
    Sandleford
    Sandleford is a hamlet and former parish in the English county of Berkshire.The settlement is now within the civil parish of Greenham, and is located approximately south of the town of Newbury.-Priory:...

    , Berkshire, alterations and additions 1780-6
  • Pishobury Park
    Pishobury
    Pishobury or Pishiobury was the second great estate in medieval Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire.- History :This sub-manor of Pishobury originated in a grant of 74 libartes of land within the Manor of Sawbridgeworth, which Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex, who died in 1144, made to Warin...

    , Hertfordshire, reconstruction of an older house after a fire 1782-4
  • Plas Newydd
    Plas Newydd
    Plas Newydd, located in Llanfairpwllgwyngyll, Anglesey, Wales, is the country seat of the Marquess of Anglesey. The family's former principal seat at Beaudesert, Staffordshire, was sold and demolished in the 1930s....

    , Anglesey, alterations & enlargements 1783-95 & 1811
  • Gunton Hall, Norfolk, enlargement 1785, partially demolished
  • Leinster House
    Leinster House
    Leinster House is the name of the building housing the Oireachtas, the national parliament of Ireland.Leinster House was originally the ducal palace of the Dukes of Leinster. Since 1922, it is a complex of buildings, of which the former ducal palace is the core, which house Oireachtas Éireann, its...

    , Dublin, decoration of the gallery 1785
  • Cremore House, Chelsea, alterations 1785-8, demolished
  • Goodwood House
    Goodwood House
    Goodwood House is a country house in West Sussex in southern England. It is the seat of the Dukes of Richmond. Several architects have contributed to the design of the house, including James Wyatt. It was the intention to build the house to a unique octagonal layout, but only three of the eight...

    , Sussex, enlargements, kennels & dower house, 1787–1806
  • Powderham Castle
    Powderham Castle
    Powderham Castle is located south of Exeter, Devon, England. The Powderham Estate, in which it is set, runs down to the western shores of the estuary of the River Exe between the villages of Kenton and Starcross....

    , addition of music room 1788
  • Felbrigg Hall
    Felbrigg Hall
    Felbrigg Hall is a 17th-century country house located in Felbrigg, Norfolk, England. Part of a National Trust property, the unaltered 17th-century house is noted for its Jacobean architecture and fine Georgian interior...

    , Norfolk, alterations 1791-1804
  • Auckland Castle
    Auckland Castle
    Auckland Castle is a castle in the town of Bishop Auckland in County Durham, England....

    , County Durham, Gothic screen and inner gateway c.1795
  • Corsham Court
    Corsham Court
    Corsham Court is an English country house in a park designed by Capability Brown. It is in the town of Corsham, 3 miles west of Chippenham, Wiltshire and is notable for its fine art collection, based on the nucleus of paintings inherited in 1757 by Paul Methuen from his uncle, Sir Paul...

    , Wiltshire, alterations 1796
  • Cricket St Thomas
    Cricket St Thomas
    Cricket St Thomas is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated in a valley beside the A30 road between Chard and Crewkerne in the South Somerset district.The village has a population of 50...

    , Somerset, alterations 1796-1800
  • Windsor Castle
    Windsor Castle
    Windsor Castle is a medieval castle and royal residence in Windsor in the English county of Berkshire, notable for its long association with the British royal family and its architecture. The original castle was built after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I it...

    , Berkshire, alterations and interiors 1796-1800
  • Canwell Hall, Staffordshire, added wings and interiors, 1798, demolished 1911
  • Swinton Park
    Swinton Park
    Swinton Park, the seat of the Danby family and of the Cunliffe-Lister family is an English country house in Swinton near Masham, North Yorkshire, England. It is set in of parkland, lakes and gardens...

    , Yorkshire, North Wing 1798
  • Cassiobury Park
    Cassiobury Park
    Cassiobury Park is the principal public open space in Watford, Hertfordshire, in England. It comprises over and extends from the A412 Rickmansworth Road in the east to the Grand Union Canal in the west....

    , Hertfordshire, alterations & additions 1799
  • Wilton House
    Wilton House
    Wilton House is an English country house situated at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire. It has been the country seat of the Earls of Pembroke for over 400 years....

    , Wiltshire, alterations 1801-11
  • Bulstrode Park
    Bulstrode Park
    Bulstrode Park is a large park to the northwest of the Buckinghamshire town of Gerrard's Cross in the English Home Counties. It dates back to before the Norman conquest.- First house:The previous house was built in 1686 for the infamous Judge Jeffreys...

    , Buckinghamshire 1807, rebuilt by Benjamin Ferrey 1862
  • Swinton Park
    Swinton Park
    Swinton Park, the seat of the Danby family and of the Cunliffe-Lister family is an English country house in Swinton near Masham, North Yorkshire, England. It is set in of parkland, lakes and gardens...

    , Yorkshire, south wing 1813
  • Chicksands Priory, Bedfordshire, alterations 1813-14


Footnotes

  1. For an admirable analysis of the mature "Wyatt manner", see Arthur Oswald article on "Rudding Hall, Yorks"., in Country Life, Feb. 4, 1949. The architect of Rudding itself is unknown.
  2. The influence of Somerset House is, in fact, apparent in Wyatt's rejected design for Downing College, Cambridge, of c. 1800 (see Gavin Walkley, "A Recently Found James Wyatt Design", R.I.B.A. Jnl., Sept. 12, and Oct. 17, 1938).

External links

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