Rome, Georgia
Overview
 
Located in the foothills
Foothills
Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in elevation at the base of a mountain range. They are a transition zone between plains and low relief hills to the adjacent topographically high mountains.-Examples:...

 of the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains #Whether the stressed vowel is or ,#Whether the "ch" is pronounced as a fricative or an affricate , and#Whether the final vowel is the monophthong or the diphthong .), often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians...

, Rome is the largest city and the county seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 of Floyd County, Georgia
Floyd County, Georgia
Floyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 90,565. Census estimates for 2007 show a population of 95,618...

, United States. It is the principal city of the Rome, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area
Rome, Georgia metropolitan area
The Rome Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of one county – Floyd – in northwest Georgia...

which encompasses all of Floyd County. At the 2009 census
Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common...

, the city had a total population of 36,031, and was the largest city in Northwest Georgia
Northwest Georgia
Northwest Georgia includes the counties of:*Dade County*Walker County*Catoosa County*Whitfield County*Murray County*Gordon County*Chattooga County*Floyd County*Bartow County*Paulding County*Polk County*Haralson County...

.

Although no Interstate highway passes through Rome, it is the largest city near the center of the triangular area defined by the Interstate highways between Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta is the capital and most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia. According to the 2010 census, Atlanta's population is 420,003. Atlanta is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, which is home to 5,268,860 people and is the ninth largest metropolitan area in...

, Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama
Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County. According to the 2010 United States Census, Birmingham had a population of 212,237. The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Area, in estimate by the U.S...

 and Chattanooga
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Chattanooga is the fourth-largest city in the US state of Tennessee , with a population of 169,887. It is the seat of Hamilton County...

, which contributes to its importance as a regional
Régional
Régional Compagnie Aérienne Européenne, or Régional for short, is a subsidiary airline wholly owned by Air France which connects hubs at Paris, Lyon, Clermont-Ferrand, and Bordeaux to 49 airports in Europe. The airline operates in Air France livery, retaining its name in small titles and logo on...

 center in several areas, such as medical care and education
Education
Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts...

.
Encyclopedia
Located in the foothills
Foothills
Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in elevation at the base of a mountain range. They are a transition zone between plains and low relief hills to the adjacent topographically high mountains.-Examples:...

 of the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
The Appalachian Mountains #Whether the stressed vowel is or ,#Whether the "ch" is pronounced as a fricative or an affricate , and#Whether the final vowel is the monophthong or the diphthong .), often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians...

, Rome is the largest city and the county seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 of Floyd County, Georgia
Floyd County, Georgia
Floyd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 90,565. Census estimates for 2007 show a population of 95,618...

, United States. It is the principal city of the Rome, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area
Rome, Georgia metropolitan area
The Rome Metropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of one county – Floyd – in northwest Georgia...

which encompasses all of Floyd County. At the 2009 census
Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common...

, the city had a total population of 36,031, and was the largest city in Northwest Georgia
Northwest Georgia
Northwest Georgia includes the counties of:*Dade County*Walker County*Catoosa County*Whitfield County*Murray County*Gordon County*Chattooga County*Floyd County*Bartow County*Paulding County*Polk County*Haralson County...

.

Although no Interstate highway passes through Rome, it is the largest city near the center of the triangular area defined by the Interstate highways between Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta is the capital and most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia. According to the 2010 census, Atlanta's population is 420,003. Atlanta is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, which is home to 5,268,860 people and is the ninth largest metropolitan area in...

, Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama
Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County. According to the 2010 United States Census, Birmingham had a population of 212,237. The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Area, in estimate by the U.S...

 and Chattanooga
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Chattanooga is the fourth-largest city in the US state of Tennessee , with a population of 169,887. It is the seat of Hamilton County...

, which contributes to its importance as a regional
Régional
Régional Compagnie Aérienne Européenne, or Régional for short, is a subsidiary airline wholly owned by Air France which connects hubs at Paris, Lyon, Clermont-Ferrand, and Bordeaux to 49 airports in Europe. The airline operates in Air France livery, retaining its name in small titles and logo on...

 center in several areas, such as medical care and education
Education
Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts...

. Rome is the home of Darlington School
Darlington School
Darlington School is an American independent, coeducational, college-preparatory day and boarding school in Rome, Georgia. It offers classes ranging from kindergarten to grade 12, divided into a lower, middle and upper school. The headmaster is Thomas C...



Rome's name is a commemoration of the Italian city of Rome
Rome
Rome is the capital of Italy and the country's largest and most populated city and comune, with over 2.7 million residents in . The city is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, on the Tiber River within the Lazio region of Italy.Rome's history spans two and a half...

. Rome, Georgia, was built on seven hills with a river running between them, a feature that was an inspiration for the name. This connection is emphasized by a replica of the statue
Statue
A statue is a sculpture in the round representing a person or persons, an animal, an idea or an event, normally full-length, as opposed to a bust, and at least close to life-size, or larger...

 of Romulus and Remus
Romulus and Remus
Romulus and Remus are Rome's twin founders in its traditional foundation myth, although the former is sometimes said to be the sole founder...

 nursing from a mother wolf, a symbol of the original Rome, which was a 1929 gift from Italian dictator Benito Mussolini
Benito Mussolini
Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini was an Italian politician who led the National Fascist Party and is credited with being one of the key figures in the creation of Fascism....

.

Geography




Rome is located at the confluence of the Etowah River
Etowah River
The Etowah River is a waterway that rises northwest of Dahlonega, Georgia, north of Atlanta. Its name is the Cherokee version of the original Muskogee word Etalwa, which means a "trail crossing". On Matthew Carey's 1795 map the river was labeled "High Town River"...

 and the Oostanaula River
Oostanaula River
The Oostanaula River is a principal tributary of the Coosa River, about long, in northwestern Georgia in the United States. Via the Coosa and Alabama rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mobile River, which flows to the Gulf of Mexico. Its name is said to come from a Cherokee Indian term...

 — the two rivers that form the Coosa River
Coosa River
The Coosa River is a tributary of the Alabama River in the U.S. states of Alabama and Georgia. The river is about long altogether.The Coosa River is one of Alabama's most developed rivers...

. Because of this feature, Rome's history was guided by the transportation and cotton industries. According to the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
The United States Census Bureau is the government agency that is responsible for the United States Census. It also gathers other national demographic and economic data...

, the city has a total area of 29.8 square miles (77.2 km²) of which 29.4 square miles (76.1 km²) is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km²) is water. The total area is 1.54% water.

The seven hills that inspired the name of Rome are Blossom Hill, Jackson Hill, Lumpkin Hill, Mount Aventine Hill, Myrtle Hill, Old Shorter Hill, and Neely Hill (also known as Tower Hill and Clock Tower Hill). Some of the hills have been partially graded since Rome was founded.

Native American era

Life in the area of Rome before the Spaniard expeditions in the 16th century is largely unknown, due to the native inhabitants' lack of written records.
There is some debate over whether Hernando de Soto
Hernando de Soto (explorer)
Hernando de Soto was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who, while leading the first European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States, was the first European documented to have crossed the Mississippi River....

 was the first Spanish conquistador
Conquistador
Conquistadors were Spanish soldiers, explorers, and adventurers who brought much of the Americas under the control of Spain in the 15th to 16th centuries, following Europe's discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1492...

 to encounter Native Americans
Native Americans in the United States
Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples in North America within the boundaries of the present-day continental United States, parts of Alaska, and the island state of Hawaii. They are composed of numerous, distinct tribes, states, and ethnic groups, many of which survive as...

 in the area now known as Rome, but it is usually agreed that he passed through the region with his expedition in 1540. In 1560, Tristán de Luna
Tristán de Luna y Arellano
Tristán de Luna y Arellano was a Spanish Conquistador of the 16th century. Born in Borobia, Spain, he came to New Spain in about 1530, and was sent on an expedition to conquer Florida in 1559...

 sent a detachment of 140 soldiers and two Dominican friars north along de Soto's route, and it is this group that established true relations with the Coosa chiefdom
Coosa chiefdom
The Coosa chiefdom was a powerful Native American paramount chiefdom near what are now Gordon and Murray counties in Georgia, in the United States. It was inhabited from about 1400 until about 1600, and dominated several smaller chiefdoms...

 as they assisted the Coosa in a raid against the rebellious province of Napochín, in what is now known as Tennessee. Exposed to unfamiliar European diseases, within 20 years these Mound Builders were gone, replaced by the Creek.

The Abihka
Abihka
The Abihka were a division of the Upper Muscogee Creeks. Their main place of residence was 50 miles west along the banks of the Coosa and Alabama Rivers, in what is now Talladega County, Alabama. At times their name is used for all of the Upper Creeks. They had three towns named Abihkutchi,...

 tribe of Creek in the area of Rome later became part of the Upper Creek, and merged with other tribes to become the Ulibahalis, who later migrated westerward into Alabama
Alabama
Alabama is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered by Tennessee to the north, Georgia to the east, Florida and the Gulf of Mexico to the south, and Mississippi to the west. Alabama ranks 30th in total land area and ranks second in the size of its inland...

 in the general region of Gadsden
Gadsden, Alabama
The city of Gadsden is the county seat of Etowah County in the U.S. state of Alabama, and it is located about 65 miles northeast of Birmingham, Alabama. It is the primary city of the Gadsden Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 103,459. Gadsden is closely associated with the...

, and were replaced by the Cherokee
Cherokee
The Cherokee are a Native American people historically settled in the Southeastern United States . Linguistically, they are part of the Iroquoian language family...

 in the mid-18th century.

There was a Cherokee village named Hightower on the site of Rome, but its people later moved to Cartersville, Georgia
Cartersville, Georgia
Cartersville is a town in Bartow County, in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 19,7314. The city is the county seat of Bartow County.-Geography:Cartersville was named for Colonel Farish Carter....

, taking the name with them. The Cherokee also referred to the area that would become Rome as "Head of Coosa", and it eventually became home to several Cherokee leaders, including Chiefs Major Ridge
Major Ridge
Major Ridge, The Ridge was a Cherokee Indian member of the tribal council, a lawmaker, and a leader. He was a veteran of the Chickamauga Wars, the Creek War, and the First Seminole War.Along with Charles R...

 and John Ross
John Ross (Cherokee chief)
John Ross , also known as Guwisguwi , was Principal Chief of the Cherokee Native American Nation from 1828–1866...

. Ridge's home here was known for years as Chieftains House, and is now Chieftains Museum
Chieftains (Rome, Georgia)
Chieftains, also known as the Major Ridge Home, is a two-story dogtrot house built in 1792 in Cherokee country...

.

In the 18th century, a high demand in Europe for American deer skins
Deerskin trade
The deerskin trade between Colonial America and the Native Americans was one of the most important trading relationships between Europeans and Native Americans, especially in the southeast. It was a form of the fur trade, but less known, since deer skins were not as valuable as furs from the north...

 had led to a brisk trade between Indian hunters and white traders, and as a result, a few white traders and some settlers (primarily from the British Colonies of Georgia
Province of Georgia
The Province of Georgia was one of the Southern colonies in British America. It was the last of the thirteen original colonies established by Great Britain in what later became the United States...

 and Carolina
Province of Carolina
The Province of Carolina, originally chartered in 1629, was an English and later British colony of North America. Because the original Heath charter was unrealized and was ruled invalid, a new charter was issued to a group of eight English noblemen, the Lords Proprietors, in 1663...

) were accepted by the Head of Coosa Cherokee. These were later joined by missionaries
Missionary
A missionary is a member of a religious group sent into an area to do evangelism or ministries of service, such as education, literacy, social justice, health care and economic development. The word "mission" originates from 1598 when the Jesuits sent members abroad, derived from the Latin...

, and then more settlers. After the American War of Independence
American Revolutionary War
The American Revolutionary War , the American War of Independence, or simply the Revolutionary War, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several European great powers.The war was the result of the...

, most new settlers came from the area of the Georgia East of the Proclamation Line of 1763.

In 1793, in response to a Cherokee raid into Tennessee
Tennessee
Tennessee is a U.S. state located in the Southeastern United States. It has a population of 6,346,105, making it the nation's 17th-largest state by population, and covers , making it the 36th-largest by total land area...

, John Sevier
John Sevier
John Sevier served four years as the only governor of the State of Franklin and twelve years as Governor of Tennessee. As a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1811 until his death...

, the Governor of Tennessee, led a retaliatory raid against the Cherokee in the Battle of Hightower
The 1793 Battle of Hightower
The Battle of Hightower in 1793 was part of the Chickamauga wars, in which the Cherokee sought to defend their territory from illegal immigration by white settlers...

, in the vicinity of Myrtle Hill. In 1802, the United States and Georgia executed the Compact of 1802
Compact of 1802
The Compact of 1802 was a compact made by U.S. president Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to the state of Georgia. In it, the United States paid Georgia 1.25 million U.S. dollars for its central and western lands , and promised that the U.S...

, in which Georgia sold its claimed Western lands to the United States and the United States agreed to ignore Cherokee land titles and remove all Cherokee from Georgia. The commitment to evict the Cherokee was not immediately enforced, and Chiefs John Ross and Major Ridge led efforts to stop their removal, including several Federal lawsuits.

During the 1813 Creek Civil War
Creek War
The Creek War , also known as the Red Stick War and the Creek Civil War, began as a civil war within the Creek nation...

, most Cherokee took the side of the Upper Creek Indians against the Red Stick Creek Indians. Before they moved to Head of Coosa, Chief Ridge commanded a company of Cherokee warriors as a unit of the Tennessee militia, with Chief Ross as adjutant
Adjutant
Adjutant is a military rank or appointment. In some armies, including most English-speaking ones, it is an officer who assists a more senior officer, while in other armies, especially Francophone ones, it is an NCO , normally corresponding roughly to a Staff Sergeant or Warrant Officer.An Adjutant...

. This unit was under the overall command of Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States . Based in frontier Tennessee, Jackson was a politician and army general who defeated the Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend , and the British at the Battle of New Orleans...

, and supported the Upper Creek.

In 1829, gold was discovered near Dahlonega, Georgia
Dahlonega, Georgia
Dahlonega is a city in Lumpkin County, Georgia, United States, and is its county seat. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 5,242....

, starting the first gold rush
Gold rush
A gold rush is a period of feverish migration of workers to an area that has had a dramatic discovery of gold. Major gold rushes took place in the 19th century in Australia, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, and the United States, while smaller gold rushes took place elsewhere.In the 19th and early...

 in the United States. The Indian Removal Act
Indian Removal Act
The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830.The Removal Act was strongly supported in the South, where states were eager to gain access to lands inhabited by the Five Civilized Tribes. In particular, Georgia, the largest state at that time, was involved in...

 of 1830, which fulfilled the Compact of 1802, was a direct result of this, and Georgia's General Assembly passed legislation in 1831 that claimed all Cherokee land in Northwest Georgia. This entire territory was called Cherokee County until additional legislation in 1832 divided the territory into the nine counties that exist today.

City founding period

In 1834, the city of Rome was founded by Col. Daniel R. Mitchell, Col. Zacharia Hargrove, Maj. Philip Hemphill, Col. William Smith, and Mr. John Lumpkin
John Henry Lumpkin
John Henry Lumpkin was an American politician, lawyer and jurist.Lumpkin was born in Lexington, Georgia, and attended Franklin College, the initial college of the University of Georgia in Athens, for some time and then attended Yale College in 1831 and 1832...

 (nephew of Governor Lumpkin
Wilson Lumpkin
Wilson Lumpkin was a governor of Georgia, and a United States Representative and Senator.-Biography:Born near Dan River, Virginia, he moved in 1784 to Oglethorpe County, Georgia with his parents, who settled near Point Peter and subsequently at Lexington, Georgia...

), who determined the name for the new city by holding a drawing. Each put his choice in a hat, with Col. Mitchell submitting the name of Rome in reference to the area's hills and rivers. Mitchell's submission was selected, and the Georgia Legislature made Rome an official city in 1835. The County Seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 was subsequently moved east from the village of Livingston
Livingston, Georgia
Livingston is the site of an old Indian village in Floyd County, Georgia, United States. The place was supposedly visited by Hernando de Soto, and evidence of his visit was found near McGee Bend on the Coosa River....

 to Rome.

With the entire area still occupied primarily by Cherokee, the city served the agrarian needs of the new cotton-based economy that had begun to replace deer-skin trading after the invention of the cotton gin
Cotton gin
A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibers from their seeds, a job formerly performed painstakingly by hand...

. The first steamboat
Steamboat
A steamboat or steamship, sometimes called a steamer, is a ship in which the primary method of propulsion is steam power, typically driving propellers or paddlewheels...

 navigated the Coosa River to Rome in 1836, reducing the time-to-market for the cotton trade and speeding travel between Rome and the Gulf Coast
Gulf Coast of the United States
The Gulf Coast of the United States, sometimes referred to as the Gulf South, South Coast, or 3rd Coast, comprises the coasts of American states that are on the Gulf of Mexico, which includes Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida and are known as the Gulf States...

.

By 1838, the Cherokee had run out of legal options, and were the last of the major tribes to be forcibly moved to the Indian Territories (in modern-day Oklahoma
Oklahoma
Oklahoma is a state located in the South Central region of the United States of America. With an estimated 3,751,351 residents as of the 2010 census and a land area of 68,667 square miles , Oklahoma is the 28th most populous and 20th-largest state...

) on the Trail of Tears. After the removal of the Cherokee, their homes and businesses were taken over by whites
Georgia Land Lottery
The Georgia land lotteries were an early nineteenth century system of land distribution in Georgia. Under this system, qualifying citizens could register for a chance to win lots of land that had formerly belonged to the Creek Indians and the Cherokee Nation. The lottery system was utilized by the...

, and the Roman economy continued to grow. In 1849, an 18-mile rail spur to the Western and Atlantic Railroad
Western and Atlantic Railroad
The Western and Atlantic Railroad of the State of Georgia' is a historic railroad that operated in the southeastern United States from Atlanta, Georgia to Chattanooga, Tennessee....

 in Kingston
Kingston, Georgia
Kingston is a city in Bartow County, Georgia, United States. The population was 659 at the 2000 census; the 2005 official estimate listed a population of 868.-Geography:Kingston is located at ....

 was completed roughly along the current path of Georgia Highway 293, significantly improving transportation to the east.

Civil war period

In April 1863, during the U.S. Civil War
American Civil War
The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States of America. In response to the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, 11 southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ; the other 25...

, the city was defended by Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest
Nathan Bedford Forrest
Nathan Bedford Forrest was a lieutenant general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. He is remembered both as a self-educated, innovative cavalry leader during the war and as a leading southern advocate in the postwar years...

 against Union Colonel Abel Streight
Abel Streight
Abel D. Streight was a peace time lumber merchant and publisher, and was a Union Army general in the American Civil War. His command precipitated a notable cavalry raid in 1863, known as Streight's Raid...

's "lightning mule" raid from the area east of modern day Cedar Bluff, Alabama
Cedar Bluff, Alabama
Cedar Bluff is a town in Cherokee County, Alabama, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 1,820. NASCAR driver Tina Gordon is from the town. Unlike the rest of the county, Cedar Bluff is a wet city. It is the "Crappie Capital of the World" – it has the highest number of crappie...

. General Forrest tricked Colonel Streight into surrendering just a few miles shy of Rome. Realizing their vulnerability, Rome's city council allocated $3,000 to build three fortifications. Although these became operational by October 1863, efforts to strengthen the forts continued as the war progressed. These forts were named after Romans who had been killed in action: Fort Attaway was on the western bank of the Oostanaula River, Fort Norton was on the eastern bank of the Oostanaula, and Fort Stovall was on the southern bank of the Etowah River. At least one other fort was later built on the northern side of the Coosa River.
In May 1864, Union General Jefferson C. Davis
Jefferson C. Davis
Jefferson Columbus Davis was an officer in the United States Army who served in the Mexican-American War, the Civil War, and the Modoc War. He was the first commander of the Department of Alaska, from 1868 to 1870...

, under the command of Major General
Major General
Major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. A major general is a high-ranking officer, normally subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general...

 William Tecumseh Sherman
William Tecumseh Sherman
William Tecumseh Sherman was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author. He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War , for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched...

, attacked and captured Rome when the outflanked Confederate defenders retreated under command of Major General
Major General
Major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. A major general is a high-ranking officer, normally subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general...

Samuel Gibbs French
Samuel Gibbs French
History of Salem County by Joseph S. Sickler, pub 1937 pp-243, 276-277...

. Union General William Vandever was stationed in Rome and is depicted with his staff in a picture taken there. Due to Rome's forts and iron works, which included the manufacture of cannon
Cannon
A cannon is any piece of artillery that uses gunpowder or other usually explosive-based propellents to launch a projectile. Cannon vary in caliber, range, mobility, rate of fire, angle of fire, and firepower; different forms of cannon combine and balance these attributes in varying degrees,...

s, Rome was a significant target during Sherman's destructive march through Georgia. Davis's forces occupied Rome for several months, making repairs to the damaged forts and briefly quartering General Sherman. Foreshadowing Sherman's Special Field Orders, No. 120
Sherman's Special Field Orders, No. 120
Sherman's Special Field Orders, No. 120 were military orders issued during the American Civil War, on November 9, 1864, by Major General William Tecumseh Sherman of the Union Army. He issued these orders in preparation for his famous March to the Sea, also known as the Savannah Campaign.-Orders:...

, Union forces destroyed Rome's forts, iron works, the rail line to Kingston, and any other material that could be useful to the South's war effort as they withdrew from Rome to participate in the Atlanta Campaign
Atlanta Campaign
The Atlanta Campaign was a series of battles fought in the Western Theater of the American Civil War throughout northwest Georgia and the area around Atlanta during the summer of 1864. Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman invaded Georgia from the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennessee, beginning in May...

.

Reconstruction period

In 1871, Rome constructed a water tank on Neely Hill, which overlooks the downtown district. This later became a clock tower
Clock tower
A clock tower is a tower specifically built with one or more clock faces. Clock towers can be either freestanding or part of a church or municipal building such as a town hall. Some clock towers are not true clock towers having had their clock faces added to an already existing building...

, and has served as the town's iconic landmark
Landmark
This is a list of landmarks around the world.Landmarks may be split into two categories - natural phenomena and man-made features, like buildings, bridges, statues, public squares and so forth...

 ever since, appearing in the city's crest and local business logos. As a result, Neely Hill is also referred to as Clock Tower Hill.

With two rivers merging to form a third, Rome has occasionally been subjected to serious flooding. The first severe flood after Rome became a city was the flood of 1886, which inundated the city and allowed a steamboat to travel down Broad Street. In 1891, upon recommendation of the United States Army Corps of Engineers
United States Army Corps of Engineers
The United States Army Corps of Engineers is a federal agency and a major Army command made up of some 38,000 civilian and military personnel, making it the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency...

, the Georgia State Legislature amended Rome's charter to create a commission to oversee the construction of river levees to protect the town against future floods. In the late 1890s, additional flood control measures were instituted, including raising the height of Broad Street by about 15 feet. As a result, many of the below-ground basements of Rome's historic buildings were originally ground level entrances.

Twentieth century

Capitoline Wolf

In 1928, the American Chatillon Company began construction of a rayon
Rayon
Rayon is a manufactured regenerated cellulose fiber. Because it is produced from naturally occurring polymers, it is neither a truly synthetic fiber nor a natural fiber; it is a semi-synthetic or artificial fiber. Rayon is known by the names viscose rayon and art silk in the textile industry...

 plant in Rome as a joint effort with the Italian Chatillon Corporation. Italian premier Benito Mussolini
Benito Mussolini
Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini was an Italian politician who led the National Fascist Party and is credited with being one of the key figures in the creation of Fascism....

 sent a block of marble from the ancient Roman Forum
Roman Forum
The Roman Forum is a rectangular forum surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the center of the city of Rome. Citizens of the ancient city referred to this space, originally a marketplace, as the Forum Magnum, or simply the Forum...

, inscribed "From Old Rome to New Rome", to be used as the cornerstone of the new rayon plant. After the rayon plant was completed in 1929, Mussolini honored Rome with a bronze replica of the sculpture of Romulus and Remus
Romulus and Remus
Romulus and Remus are Rome's twin founders in its traditional foundation myth, although the former is sometimes said to be the sole founder...

 nursing from the Capitoline Wolf
Capitoline Wolf
The Capitoline Wolf is a bronze sculpture of a she-wolf suckling twin infants, inspired by the legend of the founding of Rome. According to the legend, when Numitor, grandfather of the twins Romulus and Remus, was overthrown by his brother Amulius, the usurper ordered the twins to be cast into...

. The statue was placed in front of City Hall on a base of white marble from Tate, Georgia
Tate, Georgia
Tate is an unincorporated town in Pickens County, Georgia, United States. Originally called Marble Works post office by the United States Postal Service, then Harnageville after Ambrose Harnage, it was the first county seat for Cherokee County, which functioned as a large territory rather than a...

, with a brass plaque inscribed

"This statue of the Capitoline Wolf, as a forecast of prosperity and glory, has been sent from Ancient Rome to New Rome during the consulship of Benito Mussolini in the year 1929."


In 1940, anti-Italian sentiment due to World War II became so strong that the Rome city commission moved the statue into storage to prevent vandalism
Vandalism
Vandalism is the behaviour attributed originally to the Vandals, by the Romans, in respect of culture: ruthless destruction or spoiling of anything beautiful or venerable...

 and replaced it with an American flag. In 1952, the statue was restored to its former location in front of City Hall.

Great Depression

In Rome, Ga. the effect of The Great Depression was significantly less severe than in other,larger cities across America. Since Rome was an agricultural town, a scarcity of food was not an issue. The fact that Rome had its own textile mill that provided steady jobs was also a buffer against the hardships of the Great Depression.

An important segue into the Great Depression was the "Cotton Bust" which had hit Rome in mid 1920s, and caused many farmers to move away, sell their land or convert to other agricultural crops, such as corn. The "Cotton Bust" was the effect of the Boll Weevil
Boll weevil
The boll weevil is a beetle measuring an average length of six millimeters, which feeds on cotton buds and flowers. Thought to be native to Central America, it migrated into the United States from Mexico in the late 19th century and had infested all U.S. cotton-growing areas by the 1920s,...

, a tiny bug which was introduced to Georgia in 1915. Before the Boll Weevil came to Georgia, cotton was an abundant and cheap resource, but when the boll weevil came to Rome and North Georgia it destroyed many fields of cotton and put a damper on Rome's economy.

While the Great Depression had its effect on Rome, the area was not as devastated as many of the big cities; however, it did put many families through hard financial times. Jobs were scarce and prices of food and basic commodities went up. Even the "postal employees took a fifteen per cent cut in pay, and volunteered a further ten per cent reduction in work time in order to save the jobs of substitute employees who otherwise would have been thrown out of work." Romans bought tickets to a show put on by local performers and the fares went directly to grocers who made boxes of food to sell at a discount price to the needy families.

To lower the number of unemployed during this time, S.H. Smith, Sr. tore down the Armstrong hotel. Afterward, he employed many people to help build the towering Greystone Hotel at the corner of Broad St. and East Second St. in 1927. The Rome News-Tribune reported on November 30, 1933 ang increase in local building permits for a total of $95,800; of this amount, $85,000 was invested by S.H. Smith, Sr., in the construction of the Greystone Hotel. The Greystone Apartments were added in 1936.

Arts and culture

  • Martha Berry Museum, a Berry College founder museum.
  • Rome Area History Museum
    Rome Area History Museum
    Rome Area History Museum, currently directed by Leigh Barba, was founded in 1996 to promote an understanding of the shared past, to enrich local lives, and to inspire a stronger sense of community. Since its establishment, the museum has received over 80,000 visitors...

    , a history of Rome museum.
  • Chieftains Museum
    Chieftains (Rome, Georgia)
    Chieftains, also known as the Major Ridge Home, is a two-story dogtrot house built in 1792 in Cherokee country...

    , Major Ridge's home museum.
  • Clock Tower, a clock tower museum.
  • Rome Braves
    Rome Braves
    The Rome Braves are a Class-A minor league affiliate of the Atlanta Braves. In 2003, the team, previously known as the Macon Braves, moved from Macon, Georgia, to Rome, Georgia, 60 miles northwest of Atlanta....

    , a Class A affiliate of the Atlanta Braves.

Sites on the National Register of Historic Places

Rome has many historic homes and businesses, many of which are on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places is the United States government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation...

:

Demographics

At the 2000 census
Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common...

, there were 34,980 people, 13,320 households and 8,431 families residing in the city. The population density
Population density
Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and particularly to humans...

 was 1,190.5 per square mile (459.7/km²). There were 14,508 housing units at an average density of 493.7 per square mile (190.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.12% White, 27.66% African American, 1.42% Asian, 0.39% Native American, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 5.61% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.35% of the population.

There were 13,320 households of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 17.0% had a female householder with no husband present, wend 36.7% are non-families. 30.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.1% have someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.07.

The age distribution was 24.2% under the age of 18, 12.1% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.

The median household income
Median household income
The median household income is commonly used to generate data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more...

 was $30,930, and the median family income was $37,775. Males had a median income of $30,179 versus $22,421 for females. The per capita income
Per capita income
Per capita income or income per person is a measure of mean income within an economic aggregate, such as a country or city. It is calculated by taking a measure of all sources of income in the aggregate and dividing it by the total population...

 for the city was $17,327. About 15.3% of families and 20.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.1% of those under the age of 18 and 16.3% of those 65 and older.

Economy

Rome has long had the strength of economic diversity, founded in manufacturing, education, healthcare, technology, tourism, and other industries.

In 1954, General Electric
General Electric
General Electric Company , or GE, is an American multinational conglomerate corporation incorporated in Schenectady, New York and headquartered in Fairfield, Connecticut, United States...

 established a factory to build medium transformer
Transformer
A transformer is a device that transfers electrical energy from one circuit to another through inductively coupled conductors—the transformer's coils. A varying current in the first or primary winding creates a varying magnetic flux in the transformer's core and thus a varying magnetic field...

s. In the 1960s, Rome contributed to the American effort in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a Cold War-era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of...

 when the Rome Plow Company
Rome plow
Rome plows were large, armored, specially modified bulldozers used in South Vietnam by the United States military during the Vietnam War. First used in III Corps , major land clearing operations commenced in May 1967 upon the arrival of the 169th Engineer Battalion...

 produced Rome plow
Rome plow
Rome plows were large, armored, specially modified bulldozers used in South Vietnam by the United States military during the Vietnam War. First used in III Corps , major land clearing operations commenced in May 1967 upon the arrival of the 169th Engineer Battalion...

s, which were large armored vehicles used by the U.S. Military to clear jungles. In the latter part of the 20th century, many carpet
Carpet
A carpet is a textile floor covering consisting of an upper layer of "pile" attached to a backing. The pile is generally either made from wool or a manmade fibre such as polypropylene,nylon or polyester and usually consists of twisted tufts which are often heat-treated to maintain their...

 mills prospered in the areas surrounding Rome.

Rome is also well known in the region for its medical facilities, particularly Floyd Medical Center
Floyd Medical Center
Floyd Medical Center is a system of health care providers serving Northwest Georgia and Northeast Alabama since 1942. Located in Rome, Ga., it is Floyd County’s largest employer with over 2,000 employees....

, Redmond Regional Medical Center
Redmond Regional Medical Center
Redmond Regional Medical Center, , is located in Rome, Georgia, and is one of the largest employers in Floyd County with a staff of 1,200 and over 250 affiliated doctors. Redmond is a 230 bed medical, surgical and rehab unit serving Rome, Floyd County, and surrounding counties...

, and the Harbin Clinic
Harbin Clinic
With over 141 doctors specializing in 32 different medical specialties, the Harbin Clinic is the largest privately-owned multispecialty medical clinic in Georgia...

. Partnering with these facilities for physician development and medical education is the Northwest Georgia Clinical Campus of The Medical College of Georgia, which is part of Georgia Health Sciences University.

National companies that are part of Rome's technology industry include Brugg Cable and Telecom, Suzuki
Suzuki
is a Japanese multinational corporation headquartered in Hamamatsu, Japan that specializes in manufacturing compact automobiles and 4x4 vehicles, a full range of motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles , outboard marine engines, wheelchairs and a variety of other small internal combustion engines...

 Manufacturing of America, automobile parts makers Neaton Rome and F&P Georgia, Peach State Labs, and the North American headquarters of Pirelli
Pirelli
Pirelli & C. SpA is a diverse multinational company based in Milan, Italy. The company, the world’s fifth largest tyre manufacturer, is present in over 160 countries, has 20 manufacturing sites around the world and a network of around 10,000 distributors and retailers.Founded in Milan in 1872,...

 Tire.

Sports

Since 2003, Rome has been the home of the Rome Braves
Rome Braves
The Rome Braves are a Class-A minor league affiliate of the Atlanta Braves. In 2003, the team, previously known as the Macon Braves, moved from Macon, Georgia, to Rome, Georgia, 60 miles northwest of Atlanta....

, a Class A affiliate of the Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
The Atlanta Braves are a professional baseball club based in Atlanta, Georgia. The Braves are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The Braves have played in Turner Field since 1997....

. The Rome Braves compete in the South Atlantic League
South Atlantic League
The South Atlantic League is a minor league baseball league based chiefly in the Southeastern United States, with the exception of three teams in the Mid-Atlantic States...

.

According to the most recent numbers released on 2010, sports tourism is a major industry in Rome and Floyd County. In 2010, sport events netted over $10 million to the local economy, as reported by the Greater Rome Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Rome has hosted the NAIA Football National Championship since 2008 and will continue to host until 2015.

Tennis tournaments accounted for over $6 million to the Rome economy in 2010.

Rome has hosted stages of the Tour de Georgia
Tour de Georgia
The Tour de Georgia is a U.S. professional cycling stage race across the state of Georgia. The race began in 2003 and has been contested six times. It is one of the three events in North America ranked as Hors Classe stage race events by the UCI, which is cycling's international governing body,...

 in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007
2007 Tour de Georgia
The 2007 Tour de Georgia was a seven-stage professional bicycle race held from April 16 through April 22, 2007 across the state of Georgia and into Tennessee. The race was part of the 2007 USA Cycling Pro Tour...

.

Floyd County School District

The Floyd County School District
Floyd County School District
The Floyd County School District is a public school district in Floyd County, Georgia, USA, based in Rome, Georgia. It serves the communities of Cave Spring, Lindale, Livingston, Mount Berry, Rome, Shannon, and Silver Creek, Georgia.-Schools:...

 holds grades pre-school to grade twelve, that consists of eleven elementary schools, four middle schools, and four high schools. The district has 645 full-time teachers and over 10,272 students.

Rome City School District

The Rome City School District
Rome City School District
The Rome City School District is a public school district in Floyd County, Georgia, USA, based in Rome, Georgia. It serves the city of Rome, Georgia and the surrounding communities in Floyd County, Georgia.-Schools:...

 holds grades pre-school to grade twelve, that consists of eight elementary schools, the Rome Middle School
Rome middle school
Rome Middle School is the public middle school serving the city of Rome, Georgia . It is operated by the Rome City School District....

, and the Rome High School
Rome High School
Rome High School is a four-year public high school located in Rome, Georgia, United States. The principal is Dr. Tygar Evans.As of the 2005-06 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,487 students and 89.1 classroom teachers , for a student-teacher ratio of 16.7.-History:This school replaced...

. The district has 323 full-time teachers and over 5,395 students.

Higher education

Rome is home to four colleges:







CollegePublic/
Private
TypeNotes
Berry College
Berry College
Berry College is an American accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Mount Berry, unincorporated Floyd County, Georgia, north of Rome. It was founded in 1902 by Martha Berry.-Location:Berry College is located on U.S...

Private
Private school
Private schools, also known as independent schools or nonstate schools, are not administered by local, state or national governments; thus, they retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students' tuition, rather than relying on mandatory...

Liberal Arts
Liberal arts
The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

Founded in 1902 by Martha Berry
Georgia Northwestern Technical CollegePublic
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

Technical
Institute of technology
Institute of technology is a designation employed in a wide range of learning institutions awarding different types of degrees and operating often at variable levels of the educational system...

Formerly "Coosa Valley Technical College" which was founded in 1962
Georgia Highlands College
Georgia Highlands College
Georgia Highlands College, commonly known as Georgia Highlands, is a two-year community college associate degree-granting unit of the University System of Georgia, and located in Rome, Georgia, USA; with satellite campuses in Heritage Hall, Rome, Georgia; Cartersville, Georgia; Marietta, GA;...

Public
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

GA Community College
University System of Georgia
The University System of Georgia is the organizational body that includes 35 public institutions of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. The System is governed by the Georgia Board of Regents. It sets goals and dictates general policy to educational institutions as well as administering...

Formerly Floyd Junior College
Shorter UniversityPrivate
Private school
Private schools, also known as independent schools or nonstate schools, are not administered by local, state or national governments; thus, they retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students' tuition, rather than relying on mandatory...

Liberal Arts
Liberal arts
The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

Founded in 1873

Movie production

  • Dance of the Dead
    Dance of the Dead (2008 film)
    Dance of the Dead is a 2008 American independent zombie comedy, directed by Gregg Bishop and written by Joe Ballarini. The film featured Jared Kusnitz, Greyson Chadwick, Chandler Darby, and Carissa Capobianco...

     (2008), an independent
    Independent film
    An independent film, or indie film, is a professional film production resulting in a feature film that is produced mostly or completely outside of the major film studio system. In addition to being produced and distributed by independent entertainment companies, independent films are also produced...

     zombie comedy
    Zombie comedy
    The zombie comedy, often called zom com or zomedy, is a film genre that aims to blend zombie horror motifs with slapstick comedy as well as dark comedy.-Early years:...

     filmed at various locations in Rome and North Georgia, including the old Coosa Middle School, Myrtle Hill Cemetery
    Myrtle Hill Cemetery
    Myrtle Hill Cemetery, also nicknamed "Where Romans Rest", is the second oldest cemetery in the city of Rome, Georgia. The cemetery is at the confluence of the Etowah River and Oostanaula River and to the south of downtown Rome across the South Broad Street bridge. Myrtle Hill is one of the seven...

    , Shorter College
    Shorter College
    Shorter University is a private, coeducational, liberal arts university located in Rome, Georgia, United States. Founded in 1873, it is a Christian university historically affiliated with the Georgia Baptist Convention....

    , and the Claremount House
  • Sweet Home Alabama
    Sweet Home Alabama (film)
    Sweet Home Alabama is a 2002 American romantic comedy film directed by Andy Tennant and stars Reese Witherspoon, Josh Lucas, and Patrick Dempsey. The film was released on September 27, 2002.-Plot:...

     (2002), a romantic comedy
    Romantic Comedy
    Romantic Comedy can refer to* Romantic Comedy , a 1979 play written by Bernard Slade* Romantic Comedy , a 1983 film adapted from the play and starring Dudley Moore and Mary Steenburgen...

     filmed partly on the Berry College campus, prominently featuring the former Martha Berry
    Martha Berry
    For the Cherokee bead artist, see Martha Berry Martha McChesney Berry was an United States educator and the founder of Berry College in Rome, Georgia.-Early years:...

     residence, the Oak Hill Berry Museum
    Oak Hill Berry Museum
    Oak Hill & The Martha Berry Museum is the home and museum about Berry College founder Martha Berry located in Rome, Georgia. It is also an All-America Selections Display Garden, a part of Berry Schools on the National Register of Historic Places, and a AAA Star Attraction.-Oak Hill:Oak Hill is a ...

    . Scenes were also shot at the Coosa Country Club.
  • Remember the Titans
    Remember the Titans
    Remember the Titans is a 2000 American sports film produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and directed by Boaz Yakin. Inspired by real events, the plot was conceived from a screenplay written by Gregory Allen Howard. The film starts as a new coach of the Titans, a football team previously coached by the...

     (2000), was filmed partly on the Berry College campus.
  • Dutch
    Dutch (film)
    Dutch is a 1991 American comedy-drama film directed by Peter Faiman and written by John Hughes. The original music score was composed by Alan Silvestri...

     (1991), a comedy
    Comedy
    Comedy , as a popular meaning, is any humorous discourse or work generally intended to amuse by creating laughter, especially in television, film, and stand-up comedy. This must be carefully distinguished from its academic definition, namely the comic theatre, whose Western origins are found in...

     featuring several scenes from Berry College
    Berry College
    Berry College is an American accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Mount Berry, unincorporated Floyd County, Georgia, north of Rome. It was founded in 1902 by Martha Berry.-Location:Berry College is located on U.S...

     and Rome.
  • Perfect Harmony
    Perfect Harmony
    Perfect Harmony is a Disney movie that is set in the US Civil Rights era. The story highlights the racial tensions of the Black and White populations within a South Carolina town and its private school. The production was filmed at Berry College, and is noted for its soundtrack which featured...

     (1991), a made-for-TV movie featuring many scenes from Berry College
    Berry College
    Berry College is an American accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Mount Berry, unincorporated Floyd County, Georgia, north of Rome. It was founded in 1902 by Martha Berry.-Location:Berry College is located on U.S...

    .
  • The Mosquito Coast
    The Mosquito Coast
    The Mosquito Coast is a 1986 American film directed by Peter Weir, based on the novel by Paul Theroux. The film stars Harrison Ford, Helen Mirren, and River Phoenix. The film tells the story of a family that leaves the United States and tries to find a happier and simpler life in the jungles of...

     (1986), an adventure
    Adventure
    An adventure is defined as an exciting or unusual experience; it may also be a bold, usually risky undertaking, with an uncertain outcome. The term is often used to refer to activities with some potential for physical danger, such as skydiving, mountain climbing and or participating in extreme sports...

     movie with scenes from Rome as a fictional city in Massachusetts
    Massachusetts
    The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States of America. It is bordered by Rhode Island and Connecticut to the south, New York to the west, and Vermont and New Hampshire to the north; at its east lies the Atlantic Ocean. As of the 2010...

    . Visible are the historic Floyd County Courthouse and Oostanaula River.

Online Media

  • Coosa Valley News
  • Hometown Headlines
  • Real Fast News
  • Rome 11 Alive
  • Rome Newswire
  • Rome Sports Net

Radio stations

Call Letters Frequency Nickname Format
WGPB  97.7 FM NPR Public Radio
WLAQ
WLAQ
WLAQ is a radio station broadcasting a News Talk Information format. Licensed to Rome, Georgia, USA, the station serves the Rome GA area...

 
1410 AM n/a Talk
WQTU
WQTU
-Schedule:Q102's schedule lineup consists of:* Early Mornin' Crew* At Work Network with Monica Reed* Amanda in the afternoon-Sports Coverage:Q102 also broadcasts the Q102 High School Football Game of the Week. The station highlights one high school football game from the Northwest Georgia area.-...

 
102.3 FM Q102 Hot AC
WRGA
WRGA
Rome's NewsTalk WRGA is a radio station broadcasting a News Talk Information format. Licensed to Rome, Georgia, USA, the station serves the Rome GA area...

 
1470 AM n/a News/Talk
WSRM  93.5 FM LifeFM Contemporary Christian
WROM
WROM (AM)
WROM is a radio station broadcasting a Gospel music format. Licensed to Rome, Georgia, USA, the station serves Rome, GA and Vicinity. The station is currently under ownership of LGV Broadcasting, Inc....

 
710 AM n/a Gospel Music
WTSH  107.1 FM South 107 Country
WATG
WATG
WATG is a radio station broadcasting a classic hits format. Licensed to Trion, Georgia, USA, the station serves the Rome GA area. The station is currently owned by TTA Broadcasting, Inc and features programing from ABC Radio. The station serves as the flagship station for the Rome Braves baseball...

 
95.7 FM 95.7 The Ridge Classic Hits

Notable residents

  • Arn Anderson
    Arn Anderson
    Martin Anthony Lunde better known by his ring name Arn Anderson, is a former American professional wrestler and author. His career has been highlighted by his alliances with Ric Flair and various members of the wrestling stable, The Four Horsemen, in the NWA/WCW...

     (1958- ), professional wrestler
    Professional wrestling
    Professional wrestling is a mode of spectacle, combining athletics and theatrical performance.Roland Barthes, "The World of Wrestling", Mythologies, 1957 It takes the form of events, held by touring companies, which mimic a title match combat sport...

  • Bill Arp
    Bill Arp
    Charles Henry Smith was a Georgia politician who as a writer used the nom de plume Bill Arp for nearly 40 years...

     (birth name Charles H. Smith) (1826–1903), Rome mayor
    Mayor
    In many countries, a Mayor is the highest ranking officer in the municipal government of a town or a large urban city....

     and 19th century writer
  • Bill Atwood
    Bill Atwood
    William Franklin Atwood is a former Major League Baseball catcher. He was born on September 25, 1911 in Rome, Georgia. Bill attended college at Hardin-Simmons University. In 342 career games between 1936 and 1940, Atwood had 220 hits in 961 at bats, all for the Philadelphia Phillies. He died on...

     (1911–1993) Major League Baseball
    Major League Baseball
    Major League Baseball is the highest level of professional baseball in the United States and Canada, consisting of teams that play in the National League and the American League...

     player
  • Martha M. Berry
    Martha Berry
    For the Cherokee bead artist, see Martha Berry Martha McChesney Berry was an United States educator and the founder of Berry College in Rome, Georgia.-Early years:...

     (1865–1942), educator
    Education
    Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts...

  • Gregory S. Baer (born 1952), American lecturer and physician
  • Ronnie Brown
    Ronnie Brown
    Ronnie G. Brown, Jr. is an American football running back for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League . After graduating from Cartersville High School in Georgia, Brown attended Auburn University to play college football for the Auburn Tigers...

     (1981- ), professional football player
  • Brett Butler
    Brett Butler (comedian)
    Brett Butler is an American actress, writer, and stand-up comedian, best known for playing the title role in the comedy series Grace Under Fire.-Early life:...

     (1958- ), Actress and comedian
    Comedian
    A comedian or comic is a person who seeks to entertain an audience, primarily by making them laugh. This might be through jokes or amusing situations, or acting a fool, as in slapstick, or employing prop comedy...

  • Major General Douglas Carver
    Douglas Carver (chaplain)
    Chaplain Douglas Lanier Carver, USA is a retired American Army officer who served as the 22nd Chief of Chaplains of the United States Army...

     (born 1951), United States Army
    United States Army
    The United States Army is the main branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven U.S. uniformed services...

     Chief of Chaplains
  • Charles H. Fahy
    Charles H. Fahy
    Charles Fahy served as Solicitor General of the United States and later as a United States federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit....

     (1892–1979), U.S. Solicitor General
    United States Solicitor General
    The United States Solicitor General is the person appointed to represent the federal government of the United States before the Supreme Court of the United States. The current Solicitor General, Donald B. Verrilli, Jr. was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 6, 2011 and sworn in on June...

     and Navy Cross
    Navy Cross
    The Navy Cross is the highest decoration that may be bestowed by the Department of the Navy and the second highest decoration given for valor. It is normally only awarded to members of the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps and United States Coast Guard, but can be awarded to all...

     recipient
  • Marcus Dixon
    Marcus Dixon
    Marcus Dwayne Dixon is an American football defensive end who is currently playing for the New York Jets. He was signed by the Cowboys as an undrafted free agent in 2008...

     (1984- ), professional football player
  • Ray Donaldson
    Ray Donaldson
    Raymond Canute Donaldson is a former American football Center who played 17 seasons in the National Football League. He was selected to six Pro Bowls and then he played in Super Bowl XXX as a member of the Dallas Cowboys...

     (1958- ), American football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     player
  • Mike Glenn
    Mike Glenn
    Mike Theodore "Stinger" Glenn is an American former professional basketball player.A 6'2" guard, Glenn graduated in 1973 from Rome's Coosa High School, where he was an all-state standout, still holding the school points record at over 2,400 points for his high school career...

     (1955-), NBA
    National Basketball Association
    The National Basketball Association is the pre-eminent men's professional basketball league in North America. It consists of thirty franchised member clubs, of which twenty-nine are located in the United States and one in Canada...

  • Ken Irvin
    Ken Irvin
    Kenneth Pernell Irvin is a former American football defensive back who played for ten seasons in the NFL for the Buffalo Bills, New Orleans Saints, and the Minnesota Vikings. He played college football at the University of Memphis.Ken Irvin is currently the defensive backs coach at Pepperell High...

     (1972- ), professional football player
  • Larry Kinnebrew
    Larry Kinnebrew
    Larry D. Kinnebrew is a former professional American football player who was selected by the Cincinnati Bengals in the sixth round of the 1983 NFL Draft...

     (1960- ), professional football player
  • John H. Lumpkin
    John Henry Lumpkin
    John Henry Lumpkin was an American politician, lawyer and jurist.Lumpkin was born in Lexington, Georgia, and attended Franklin College, the initial college of the University of Georgia in Athens, for some time and then attended Yale College in 1831 and 1832...

     (1812–1860), Co-founder of Rome, Superior Court
    Superior court
    In common law systems, a superior court is a court of general competence which typically has unlimited jurisdiction with regard to civil and criminal legal cases...

     Judge
    Judge
    A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as part of a panel of judges. The powers, functions, method of appointment, discipline, and training of judges vary widely across different jurisdictions. The judge is supposed to conduct the trial impartially and in an open...

    , and U.S. Representative
    United States House of Representatives
    The United States House of Representatives is one of the two Houses of the United States Congress, the bicameral legislature which also includes the Senate.The composition and powers of the House are established in Article One of the Constitution...

  • Homer V. M. Miller
    Homer V. M. Miller
    Homer Virgil Milton Miller was a United States Senator from Georgia.Born in Pendleton, South Carolina, he moved with his parents to Rabun County, Georgia in 1820. He attended the common schools and graduated from the Medical College of South Carolina in 1835. He continued medical studies in Paris...

     (1814–1896), U.S. Senator
    United States Senate
    The United States Senate is the upper house of the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the United States House of Representatives comprises the United States Congress. The composition and powers of the Senate are established in Article One of the U.S. Constitution. Each...

    , senior Confederate
    Confederate States of America
    The Confederate States of America was a government set up from 1861 to 1865 by 11 Southern slave states of the United States of America that had declared their secession from the U.S...

     medical officer
  • George Stephen Morrison
    George Stephen Morrison
    George Stephen Morrison was a Rear Admiral and naval aviator in the United States Navy. Morrison was commander of the U.S. naval forces in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Gulf of Tonkin Incident of August 1964...

     (1919–2008), Admiral; father of singer Jim Morrison
    Jim Morrison
    James Douglas "Jim" Morrison was an American musician, singer, and poet, best known as the lead singer and lyricist of the rock band The Doors...

  • Will Muschamp
    Will Muschamp
    William Larry "Will" Muschamp is an American college football coach and former player. He is the current head coach of the Florida Gators football team of the University of Florida. He is a native of Georgia and attended the University of Georgia, where he played for the Georgia Bulldogs...

     (1971- ), College football
    College football
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     head coach
  • Ma Rainey
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    Ma Rainey was one of the earliest known American professional blues singers and one of the first generation of such singers to record. She was billed as The Mother of the Blues....

     (1886–1939), blues
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     singer
  • Dan Reeves
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     (1944- ), American football
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     player and head coach
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  • Major Ridge
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     Chief and co-signer of the Treaty of New Echota
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  • John Ross
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    admiral
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     and pioneer naval aviator
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  • Stand Watie
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     (1806–1871), Cherokee Indian
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     leader and Confederate
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     general
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  • Calder Willingham
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     (1922–1995), screenwriter
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     and novelist
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    First Lady of the United States
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     and first wife of President Woodrow Wilson
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External links


Further reading

  • Roger Aycock, All Roads to Rome, Georgia: W. H. Wolfe Associates, 1981. Amazon.com
  • Jerry R. Desmond, Georgia's Rome: A Brief History, Charleston: The History Press, 2008. Amazon.com
  • George Magruder Battey Jr., A History of Rome and Floyd County, Georgia 1540-1922, Georgia: Cherokee Publishing Company, 2000. Amazon.com
  • Sesquicentennial Committee of the City of Rome, Rome and Floyd County: An Illustrated History, The Delmar Co 1986.Amazon.com
  • Morrell Johnson Darko, The Rivers Meet: A History of African-Americans in Rome, Georgia, Darko, 2003. Amazon.com
  • Orlena M. Warner, When in Rome..., Georgia: Steven Warner, 1972. A collection of poems. Amazon.com
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