Combat Infantryman Badge
Overview
 
The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is the U.S. Army combat service recognition decoration awarded to soldiers—enlisted men and officers (commissioned and warrant) holding colonel
Colonel
Colonel , abbreviated Col or COL, is a military rank of a senior commissioned officer. It or a corresponding rank exists in most armies and in many air forces; the naval equivalent rank is generally "Captain". It is also used in some police forces and other paramilitary rank structures...

 rank or below, who personally fought in active ground combat while an assigned member of either an infantry
Infantry
Infantrymen are soldiers who are specifically trained for the role of fighting on foot to engage the enemy face to face and have historically borne the brunt of the casualties of combat in wars. As the oldest branch of combat arms, they are the backbone of armies...

 or a Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat analogue, the infantry skill-recognition Expert Infantryman Badge
Expert Infantryman Badge
The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a military badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge , it is a completely different award: while the CIB is awarded for participation in ground combat, the EIB is presented for completion of a...

 (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

 as primary recognition of the combat service and sacrifices of the infantrymen who would likely be wounded or killed in numbers disproportionate to those of soldiers from the Army’s other service branches.
After the United States' declaration of war in 1941, the U.S.
Encyclopedia
The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is the U.S. Army combat service recognition decoration awarded to soldiers—enlisted men and officers (commissioned and warrant) holding colonel
Colonel
Colonel , abbreviated Col or COL, is a military rank of a senior commissioned officer. It or a corresponding rank exists in most armies and in many air forces; the naval equivalent rank is generally "Captain". It is also used in some police forces and other paramilitary rank structures...

 rank or below, who personally fought in active ground combat while an assigned member of either an infantry
Infantry
Infantrymen are soldiers who are specifically trained for the role of fighting on foot to engage the enemy face to face and have historically borne the brunt of the casualties of combat in wars. As the oldest branch of combat arms, they are the backbone of armies...

 or a Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat analogue, the infantry skill-recognition Expert Infantryman Badge
Expert Infantryman Badge
The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a military badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge , it is a completely different award: while the CIB is awarded for participation in ground combat, the EIB is presented for completion of a...

 (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

 as primary recognition of the combat service and sacrifices of the infantrymen who would likely be wounded or killed in numbers disproportionate to those of soldiers from the Army’s other service branches.

History

After the United States' declaration of war in 1941, the U.S. Army had difficulty recruiting Infantry
Infantry
Infantrymen are soldiers who are specifically trained for the role of fighting on foot to engage the enemy face to face and have historically borne the brunt of the casualties of combat in wars. As the oldest branch of combat arms, they are the backbone of armies...

 branch volunteers, unlike its other, more glamorous branches (e.g. the Tank Corps
Tank Corps
Tank Corps may refer to:* Tank Corps, later Royal Tank Corps, early name of the Royal Tank Regiment* Tank Corps , a type of Red Army formation used up to World War II...

, the Army Air Forces). To increase recruitment and raise its esprit de corps, General
General
A general officer is an officer of high military rank, usually in the army, and in some nations, the air force. The term is widely used by many nations of the world, and when a country uses a different term, there is an equivalent title given....

 Lesley J. McNair
Lesley J. McNair
General Lesley James McNair was an American Army officer who served during World War I and World War II. He was killed by friendly fire when a USAAF Eighth Air Force bomb landed in his foxhole near Saint-Lô during Operation Cobra as part of the Battle of Normandy.McNair, Frank Maxwell Andrews and...

, the Army Ground Forces
Army Ground Forces
The Army Ground Forces were one of the three autonomous components of the Army of the United States during World War II, the others being the Army Air Forces and Army Service Forces. Throughout their existence, Army Ground Forces were the largest training organization ever established in the United...

 commander, conceived of two ideas—(i) a large, recognizable combat service badge, for the infantry ranks, and (ii) replacing the title Private with the title Fighter, thereby, raising the soldier’s morale when addressing “Private Jones” as “Fighter Jones”. The badge idea was accepted, the title idea rejected; however, the General insisted upon the Fighter Badge title. On 7 October 1943, the War Department formally established the Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) and the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) awards in Section I, War Department Circular 269 (27 October 1943):

The present war has demonstrated the importance of highly-proficient, tough, hard, and aggressive infantry, which can be obtained only by developing a high degree of individual all-around proficiency on the part of every infantryman. As a means of attaining the high standards desired and to foster esprit de corps in infantry units; the Expert Infantryman and the Combat Infantryman badges are established for infantry personnel.


Moreover, War Department Circular 269 stipulated: …only one of these badges will be worn at one time and the Combat Infantryman badge is the highest award; the awarding of the CIB was officially authorized with an executive order dated 15 November 1943; later, on 10 June 1944, the U.S. Congress approved an extra ten dollars in monthly pay to every infantryman awarded the CIB—excepting commissioned officers. The WWII regulations did not formally prescribe a specific combat service period establishing the infantryman’s eligibility for being awarded a Combat Infantryman Badge, thus, in 1947, the U.S. Government implemented a policy authorizing the retroactive awarding of the Bronze Star Medal
Bronze Star Medal
The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration that may be awarded for bravery, acts of merit, or meritorious service. As a medal it is awarded for merit, and with the "V" for valor device it is awarded for heroism. It is the fourth-highest combat award of the...

 to World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

 veteran soldiers who had been awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge, because the CIB was awarded only to soldiers who had borne combat duties befitting the recognition conferred by a Bronze Star Medal. Both awards required a commander’s recommendation and a citation
Citation
Broadly, a citation is a reference to a published or unpublished source . More precisely, a citation is an abbreviated alphanumeric expression Broadly, a citation is a reference to a published or unpublished source (not always the original source). More precisely, a citation is an abbreviated...

 in the pertinent orders. General Marshall
George Marshall
George Catlett Marshall was an American military leader, Chief of Staff of the Army, Secretary of State, and the third Secretary of Defense...

 initiated this after Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President, in the name of Congress, upon members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her...

–recipient Major Charles W. Davis
Charles W. Davis
Charles Willis Davis was a United States Army officer and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.-Biography:...

 noted to him that: It would be wonderful, if someone could design a badge for every infantryman who faces the enemy, every day and every night, with so little recognition.

War Department Circular 105, dated 13 March 1944 amended WD Circular 269. Page 2, paragraph IV. BADGE--- Section 1, Circular No. 269 War Department, 1943, is amended by adding paragraph 8 as follows:
8. Retroactive award of Expert and Combat Infantryman badges may be awarded to any infantryman who, on or after 6 December 1941, has established eligibility and been recommended for such award under the provisions of paragraph 2b or paragraph 3.
b. The Expert Infantryman badge may be awarded under paragraph 2a, only to those infantryman who have established eligibility and been recommended for such award on or after 27 October 1943.

Award eligibility

Post WWII
As defined by The United States Army Institute of Heraldry:

a. There are basically three requirements for award of the CIB. The Soldier must be an Infantryman satisfactorily performing Infantry duties, must be assigned to an Infantry unit during such time as the unit is engaged in active ground combat, and must actively participate in such ground combat.

b. The specific eligibility criteria for the CIB require that:

(1) A Soldier must be an Army Infantry or Special Forces
Special forces
Special forces, or special operations forces are terms used to describe elite military tactical teams trained to perform high-risk dangerous missions that conventional units cannot perform...

 officer (SSI 11 or 18) in the grade of Colonel or below, or an Army Enlisted Soldier or Warrant Officer with an Infantry or Special Forces MOS, who subsequent to 6 December 1941 has satisfactorily performed duty while assigned or attached as a member of an Infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size during any period such unit was engaged in active ground combat. Eligibility for Special Forces personnel in Military Occupational Specialties accrues from 20 December 1989. Retroactive awards for Special Forces personnel are not authorized prior to 20 December 1989.

(2) A recipient must be personally present and under hostile fire while serving in an assigned Infantry or Special Forces primary duty, in a unit actively engaged in ground combat with the enemy. The unit in question can be of any size smaller than brigade.

(3) Personnel with other than an Infantry or Special Forces MOS are not eligible, regardless of the circumstances. The Infantry or Special Forces SSI or MOS does not necessarily have to be the Soldier’s primary specialty, as long as the Soldier has been properly trained in infantry or special forces tactics, possesses the appropriate skill code, and is serving in that specialty when engaged in active ground combat as described above. Commanders are not authorized to make any exceptions to this policy.

(4) Awards will not be made to General Officers or to members of headquarters companies of units larger in size than brigade.

(5) On or after 18 September 2001:

(a) A Soldier must be an Army Infantry or special forces officer (SSI 11 or 18) in the grade of Colonel or below, or an Army Enlisted Soldier or Warrant Officer with an Infantry or Special Forces MOS, who has satisfactorily performed duty while assigned or attached as a member of an infantry, ranger or special forces unit of brigade, regimental or smaller size during any period such unit was engaged in active ground combat, to close with and destroy the enemy with direct fires.

(b) A Soldier must be personally present and under fire while serving in an assigned Infantry or Special Forces primary duty, in a unit engaged in active ground combat to close with and destroy the enemy with direct fires. Improvised Explosive Device
Improvised explosive device
An improvised explosive device , also known as a roadside bomb, is a homemade bomb constructed and deployed in ways other than in conventional military action...

 (IEDs), Vehicle-Borne IEDS (VBIEDS) and the like are direct fire weapons. While no fixed, qualifying distance from an explosion of these devices can be established, commanders should consider the entirety of the combat situation when considering award of the CIB.

(c) Soldiers possessing MOS of 18D (Special Forces Medical Sergeant) who satisfactorily perform Special Forces duties while assigned or attached to a Special Forces unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size during any period such unit is engaged in active ground combat may be awarded the CIB. These Soldiers must have been personally present and engaged in active ground combat, to close with and destroy the enemy with direct fires. Retroactive awards under these criteria are not authorized for service prior to 18 September 2001.

(d) Those Soldiers possessing MOS of 18D who qualify for award of the Combat Medical Badge
Combat Medical Badge
The Combat Medical Badge is an award of the United States Army which was first created in January 1945. The badge is awarded to any member of the Army Medical Department, at the rank of Colonel or below, who are assigned or attached to a medical unit which provides medical support to a ground...

 (CMB) from 18 September 2001 to the 3 June 2005, will remain qualified for the badge. Upon request any such soldier may be awarded the CIB instead of the CMB. In such instances, the Soldier must submit a request through the chain of command to the CG, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, ATTN: AHRC-PDO-PA, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471 for conversion of the CMB to the CIB.

(e) Service members from the other U.S. Armed Forces and foreign military (Infantry and Special Forces equivalents) assigned or attached as a member of a U.S. Army Infantry or Special Forces unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size may be considered for award of the CIB. All basic requirements as listed above must be met. Retroactive awards under these criteria are not authorized for service prior to 18 September 2001.

c. The CIB is authorized for award for the following qualifying wars, conflicts, and operations:

(1) World War II (7 December 1941 to 3 September 1945).

(2) The Korean War (27 June 1950 to 27 July 1953).

(3) Republic of Vietnam Conflict (2 March 1961 to 28 March 1973), combined with qualifying service in Laos (19 April 1961 to 6 October 1962).

(4) Dominican Republic (28 April 1965 to 1 September 1966).

(5) Korea on the DMZ (4 January 1969 to 31 March 1994).

(6) El Salvador (1 January 1981 to 1 February 1992).

(7) Grenada (23 October to 21 November 1983).

(8) Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea (23 November 1984).

(9) Panama (20 December 1989 to 31 January 1990).

(10) Southwest Asia Conflict (17 January to 11 April 1991).

(11) Somalia (5 June 1992 to 31 March 1994).

(12) Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, 5 December 2001 to a date to be determined).

(13) Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, 19 March 2003 to a date to be determined).

d. The special provision authorized for the War on Terrorism is listed in this paragraph. The CIB may be awarded to recognize those U.S. Army Infantry and Special Forces Soldiers embedded in formed Afghan National Army or Iraqi Infantry/Special Force units, or Iraqi specialized Infantry type units, of brigade, regimental or smaller size, or assigned as advisers to a foreign Infantry/Special Forces comparable to the above Infantry units, as tactical advisers, trainers or performing liaison duties, during the time that the supported Infantry/Special Force unit engages in active ground combat, to close with and destroy the enemy with direct fires. Qualified Soldiers must have been personally present and participated in the combat operations.

e. The special provisions authorized for the Vietnam Conflict, Laos, and Korea on the DMZ are outlined below.

(1) During the Vietnam Conflict, any officer whose basic branch is other than Infantry who, under appropriate orders, has commanded a line Infantry (other than a headquarters unit) unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size for at least 30 consecutive days is deemed to have been detailed in Infantry and is eligible for award of the CIB notwithstanding absence of a written directive detailing that Soldier in the Infantry, provided all other requirements for the award have been met. Orders directing the officer to assume command will be confirmed in writing at the earliest practicable date.

(a) In addition, any Officer, Warrant Officer, or Enlisted Soldier whose branch is other than Infantry, who under appropriate orders was assigned to advise a unit listed in (c) and (d) below or was assigned as a member of a White Star Mobile Training Team or a member of MAAG-Laos as indicated in (2)(a) and (b) below will be eligible for award of the CIB provided all other requirements have been met.

(b) After 1 December 1967, for service in the Republic of Vietnam, Non-commissioned Officers serving as Command Sergeants Major of infantry Battalions and brigades for periods of at least 30 consecutive days in a combat zone are eligible for award of the CIB provided all other requirements have been met.

(c) Subsequent to 1 March 1961, a Soldier must have been:

1. Assigned as adviser to an Infantry unit, Ranger unit, Infantry-type unit of the civil guard of regimental or smaller size, and/or Infantry-type unit of the self-defense corps unit of regimental or smaller size of the Vietnamese government during any period such unit was engaged in actual ground combat.

2. Assigned as adviser of an irregular force comparable to the above Infantry units under similar conditions.

3. Personally present and under fire while serving in an assigned primary duty as a member of a tactical advisory team while the unit participated in ground combat.

(d) Subsequent to 24 May 1965, to qualify for the CIB, personnel serving in U.S. units must meet the requirements of b(1), above. Individuals who performed liaison duties with the Royal Thai Army or the Army of the Republic of Korea combat units in Vietnam are eligible for award of the badge provided they meet all other requirements.

(2) In Laos from 19 April 1961 to 6 October 1962, a Soldier must have been:

(a) Assigned as a member of a White Star Mobile Training Team while the team was attached to or working with a unit of regimental (groupment mobile) or smaller size of Forces Armee du Royaume (FAR) , or with irregular type forces of regimental or smaller size.

(b) A member of MAAG-Laos assigned as an advisor to a region or zone of FAR, or while serving with irregular type forces of regimental or smaller size.

(c) Personally under hostile fire while assigned as specified in (a) and (b) above.

(3) In Korea on the DMZ. The special requirements for award of the CIB for service in the Republic of Korea are rescinded. Army veterans and service members who served in Korea on or after 28 July 1953 and meet the criteria for award of the CIB outlined in paragraph 8-6c, may submit an application (to include supporting documentation) for award of the CIB to USA HRC, ATTN: AHRC-PDO-PA, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471. Retroactive awards under these criteria are not authorized for service prior to 29 July 1953.

f. Second and third awards of the CIB are indicated by superimposing 1 and 2 stars respectively, centered at the top of the badge between the points of the oak wreath. To date, a separate award of the CIB has been authorized for qualified Soldiers in the following qualifying periods:

(1) World War II (7 December 1941 to 3 September 1945).

(2) The Korean Conflict (27 June 1950 to 27 July 1953).

(3) The Republic of Vietnam Conflict. Service in the Republic of Vietnam Conflict (2 March 1961 to 28 March 1973) combined with qualifying service in Laos; Dominican Republic; Korea on the DMZ; El Salvador; Grenada; Joint Security Area, Panmunjom, Korea; Panama; Southwest Asia Conflict; and Somalia, regardless of whether a Soldier has served one or multiple tours in any or all of these areas. The Republic of Vietnam Conflict Era officially terminated on 10 March 1995.

(4) War on Terrorism (Afghanistan, Operation ENDURING FREEDOM) and (Iraq, Operation IRAQI FREEDOM).

g. Subsequent awards of the CIB are not authorized for the same qualifying period, as outlined above. The CIB may be awarded by the following individuals:

(1) Current awards. These awards may be awarded by USA HRC, ATTN: AHRC-PDP-A and Army commanders in the grade of 0-6 and above.

(2) Retroactive awards of the CIB. These awards may be awarded by USA HRC, ATTN: AHRC-PDP-A to active duty Soldiers and Reserve Component Soldiers. Applications for retroactive award will be forwarded through command channels to USA HRC, ATTN: AHRC-PDP-A, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471. Retirees and veterans should address their application to the National Personnel Records Center, St. Louis, MO 63132-5100. Retroactive award of the CIB is authorized for time periods specified above to fully qualified individuals. Such awards will not be made except where evidence of injustice is presented.

Design of the Combat Infantryman Badge

The design inspiration of the U.S. Army’s Combat Infantryman Badge derives from two Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
The Wehrmacht – from , to defend and , the might/power) were the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany from 1935 to 1945. It consisted of the Heer , the Kriegsmarine and the Luftwaffe .-Origin and use of the term:...

 infantry combat service recognition decorations: the Infantry Assault Badge
Infantry Assault Badge
The Infantry Assault Badge was a German war badge awarded to Waffen SS and Wehrmacht Heer soldiers during WWII. This decoration was instituted on December 20th 1939 by the Oberstbefehlshaber des Heeres, Generalfeldmarschall von Brauchitsch...

(Infanterie Sturmabzeichen), featuring a service rifle
Service rifle
The service rifle of a given army or armed force is that which it issues as standard to its soldiers. In modern forces, this is typically a highly versatile and rugged assault rifle suitable for use in nearly all theatres and environments...

 enclosed in an oak
Oak
An oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus , of which about 600 species exist. "Oak" may also appear in the names of species in related genera, notably Lithocarpus...

-leaf wreath
Wreath
A wreath is an assortment of flowers, leaves, fruits, twigs and/or various materials that is constructed to resemble a ring. They are used typically as Christmas decorations to symbolize the coming of Christ, also known as the Advent season in Christianity. They are also used as festive headdresses...

, and the Close Combat Clasp
Close Combat Clasp
The Close Combat Clasp is a German military award instituted on 25 November 1942 for achievement in hand to hand fighting in close quarters. The Close Combat Clasp was worn above the upper left uniform pocket...

(Nahkampfspange).

The original, Second World War-model CIB was a silver and enamel badge, consisting of a 3 inches (76.2 mm) rectangular bar with an infantry-blue field upon which is superimposed the War of Independence-era Springfield Arsenal Musket, Model 1795. The composite device is superimposed to an elliptic oak-leaf wreath, symbolizing steadfast character, strength, and loyalty. During WW2, there existed metallic, composite models of the CIB composed of a separate EIB rectangle-badge and oak-leaf wreath that then was pinned to the blouse, as a Combat Infantryman Badge. Later, a matte-black subdued metal badge was created for wearing on the fatigues in the field. Since World War II, the CIB has been made in cloth (colored and subdued) for wear, like the matte-metal model, on the fatigue field uniform, and, a miniature (1.25 inches long) lacquered-metal CIB model is available for wearing on the mess dress uniform and civilian clothes.

On 8 February 1952, the Army approved the addition of stars to the CIB indicating the soldier’s having fought in more than one war. The first was the second-award CIB recognizing Korean War
Korean War
The Korean War was a conventional war between South Korea, supported by the United Nations, and North Korea, supported by the People's Republic of China , with military material aid from the Soviet Union...

 combat operations; in that time, the U.S. Army’s Institute of Heraldry also had created eighth-award CIB designs. The second- through fourth-award CIB awards were indicated with silver five-point stars, 1 to 3 stars centered, at badge’s top, between the tips of the oak-leaf wreath; the fifth- through eighth-awards of the CIB were indicated with gold stars.

Currently, the Combat Infantryman Badge is worn one-quarter (0.25") inch above the service ribbons above the left-breast pocket of the Class-A uniform coat and of the other uniforms with which the CIB is authorized.

Analogue combat service badges: the CMB and the CAB, EIB, EFMB

The U.S. Army also recognizes the combat service of medics with the Combat Medical Badge
Combat Medical Badge
The Combat Medical Badge is an award of the United States Army which was first created in January 1945. The badge is awarded to any member of the Army Medical Department, at the rank of Colonel or below, who are assigned or attached to a medical unit which provides medical support to a ground...

, awarded to medical personnel who usually serve alongside infantry units, and the Combat Action Badge
Combat Action Badge
The Combat Action Badge is a military badge worn in the U.S. Army. The emblem features both an M9 bayonet and M67 grenade. The Combat Action Badge may be awarded to any soldier after the date of September 18, 2001 performing duties in an area where hostile fire pay or imminent danger pay is...

, awarded to combat arms other than Infantry (Armor, Cavalry, Field Artillery), combat support (CSC) and combat service support (CSS) soldiers who serve in combat in contemporary wars without delineated front lines. This last badge, the CAB, was created in 2005 for soldiers who, otherwise, qualify for neither the CIB nor the CMB. The US Army Expert Infantryman Badge
Expert Infantryman Badge
The Expert Infantryman Badge, or EIB, is a military badge of the United States Army. Although similar in name and appearance to the Combat Infantryman Badge , it is a completely different award: while the CIB is awarded for participation in ground combat, the EIB is presented for completion of a...

 is similar in appearance but different in requirements to the CIB.
The Expert Field Medical Badge
Expert Field Medical Badge
The Expert Field Medical Badge is a United States Army decoration first created on June 18, 1965. This badge is the non-combat equivalent of the Combat Medical Badge and is awarded to medical personnel of the US Military who successfully complete a set of qualification tests including both written...

 is the equivalent to the EIB.
See: Military badges of the United States
Military badges of the United States
Military badges of the United States are awards authorized by the United States armed forces that signify rating, qualification, or accomplishment in several career fields, and also serve as identification devices for personnel occupying certain assignments. Personal recognition is granted to...

 and three-time recipients of the Combat Infantryman Badge

Similar awards

  • Infantry combat badge
    Infantry combat badge
    The Infantry Combat Badge is awarded to members of the Australian Army for service as an Infantryman in warlike operations.-History:The ICB was first established in July 1970 for recognition of infantry service in battle or on operations, following the decision of the Military Board in January 1970...

     (Australia)
  • Combat Action Ribbon
    Combat Action Ribbon
    The Combat Action Ribbon is a personal military decoration of the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard which is awarded to those who, in any grade including and below that of a Captain in the Navy and Coast Guard , have actively participated in ground or...

     (USN & USMC)
  • Air Force Combat Action Medal
    Air Force Combat Action Medal
    The Air Force Combat Action Medal is a relatively new medal issued by the United States Air Force. It was first awarded on June 12, 2007 for actions from September 11, 2001 to a date to be determined and may be awarded posthumously.-Criteria:...

     (USAF)
  • Pro Patria Medal Orders, decorations, and medals of South Africa

See also

  • List of Three-Time Recipients of the CIB

External links

The source of this article is wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
 
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