University of Miami
Overview
 
The University of Miami (informally referred to as UM, U of M, U Miami, Miami, or The U) is a private, non-sectarian university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

 founded in 1925 with its main campus in Coral Gables
Coral Gables, Florida
Coral Gables is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, southwest of Downtown Miami, in the United States. The city is home to the University of Miami....

, Florida
Florida
Florida is a state in the southeastern United States, located on the nation's Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the north by Alabama and Georgia and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of 18,801,310 as measured by the 2010 census, it...

, a medical campus
Medical school
A medical school is a tertiary educational institution—or part of such an institution—that teaches medicine. Degree programs offered at medical schools often include Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Bachelor/Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, master's degree, or other post-secondary...

 in Miami city proper
City proper
City proper is defined as a "locality with legally fixed boundaries and an administratively recognized urban status that is usually characterized by some form of local government", or the area within the corporate limits. This definition has been consistently used since the United Nations...

 at Civic Center
Civic Center (Miami)
Civic Center is a neighborhood in the city of Miami, Florida USA. The Civic Center is bound roughly by Northwest 20th Street and 14th Avenue to the northwest, the Dolphin Expressway and the Miami River to the south and west, and the Midtown Interchange and I-95 to the east.The Civic Center has the...

, and an oceanographic
Oceanography
Oceanography , also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth science that studies the ocean...

 research facility on Virginia Key
Virginia Key
Virginia Key is a barrier island in Miami, Florida, United States in Biscayne Bay, south of Brickell and north of Key Biscayne. It accessible from the mainland via the Rickenbacker Causeway....

.

, the university currently enrolls 15,629 students in 12 separate colleges, including a medical school
Medical school
A medical school is a tertiary educational institution—or part of such an institution—that teaches medicine. Degree programs offered at medical schools often include Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Bachelor/Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, master's degree, or other post-secondary...

, law school
Law school
A law school is an institution specializing in legal education.- Law degrees :- Canada :...

, and a school focused on the study of oceanography
Oceanography
Oceanography , also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth science that studies the ocean...

 and atmospheric sciences
Atmospheric sciences
Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella term for the study of the atmosphere, its processes, the effects other systems have on the atmosphere, and the effects of the atmosphere on these other systems. Meteorology includes atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics with a major focus on weather...

.
Encyclopedia
The University of Miami (informally referred to as UM, U of M, U Miami, Miami, or The U) is a private, non-sectarian university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

 founded in 1925 with its main campus in Coral Gables
Coral Gables, Florida
Coral Gables is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, southwest of Downtown Miami, in the United States. The city is home to the University of Miami....

, Florida
Florida
Florida is a state in the southeastern United States, located on the nation's Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the north by Alabama and Georgia and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of 18,801,310 as measured by the 2010 census, it...

, a medical campus
Medical school
A medical school is a tertiary educational institution—or part of such an institution—that teaches medicine. Degree programs offered at medical schools often include Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Bachelor/Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, master's degree, or other post-secondary...

 in Miami city proper
City proper
City proper is defined as a "locality with legally fixed boundaries and an administratively recognized urban status that is usually characterized by some form of local government", or the area within the corporate limits. This definition has been consistently used since the United Nations...

 at Civic Center
Civic Center (Miami)
Civic Center is a neighborhood in the city of Miami, Florida USA. The Civic Center is bound roughly by Northwest 20th Street and 14th Avenue to the northwest, the Dolphin Expressway and the Miami River to the south and west, and the Midtown Interchange and I-95 to the east.The Civic Center has the...

, and an oceanographic
Oceanography
Oceanography , also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth science that studies the ocean...

 research facility on Virginia Key
Virginia Key
Virginia Key is a barrier island in Miami, Florida, United States in Biscayne Bay, south of Brickell and north of Key Biscayne. It accessible from the mainland via the Rickenbacker Causeway....

.

, the university currently enrolls 15,629 students in 12 separate colleges, including a medical school
Medical school
A medical school is a tertiary educational institution—or part of such an institution—that teaches medicine. Degree programs offered at medical schools often include Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, Bachelor/Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, master's degree, or other post-secondary...

, law school
Law school
A law school is an institution specializing in legal education.- Law degrees :- Canada :...

, and a school focused on the study of oceanography
Oceanography
Oceanography , also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth science that studies the ocean...

 and atmospheric sciences
Atmospheric sciences
Atmospheric sciences is an umbrella term for the study of the atmosphere, its processes, the effects other systems have on the atmosphere, and the effects of the atmosphere on these other systems. Meteorology includes atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics with a major focus on weather...

. These colleges offer approximately 115 undergraduate, 114 master’s, 51 doctoral, and two professional areas of study. Over the years, the University's students have represented all 50 states and close to 150 foreign countries. With more than 13,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, UM is the sixth largest employer in Miami-Dade County.

Research is a component of each academic division, with UM attracting $326 million per year in sponsored research grants. UM also offers a large library system with over 3.1 million volumes and exceptional holdings in Cuba
Cuba
The Republic of Cuba is an island nation in the Caribbean. The nation of Cuba consists of the main island of Cuba, the Isla de la Juventud, and several archipelagos. Havana is the largest city in Cuba and the country's capital. Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city...

n heritage and music. UM also offers a wide range of student activities, including fraternities and sororities, a student newspaper and radio station. UM's intercollegiate athletic teams compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association
National Collegiate Athletic Association
The National Collegiate Athletic Association is a semi-voluntary association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States...

, and its football team has won five national championships.

History

A group of citizens chartered the University of Miami in 1925 with the intent to offer "unique opportunities to develop inter-American studies, to further creative work in the arts and letters, and to conduct teaching and research programs in tropical studies." They believed that a local university would benefit their community. They were overly optimistic about future financial support for UM because the South Florida
South Florida metropolitan area
The South Florida metropolitan area, also known as the Miami metropolitan area, and designated the Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Pompano Beach, FL Metropolitan Statistical Area by the U.S...

 land boom was at its peak. During the Jim Crow era
Jim Crow laws
The Jim Crow laws were state and local laws in the United States enacted between 1876 and 1965. They mandated de jure racial segregation in all public facilities, with a supposedly "separate but equal" status for black Americans...

, there were three large state-funded universities in Florida for white males, white females, and black Americans (UF
University of Florida
The University of Florida is an American public land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant research university located on a campus in Gainesville, Florida. The university traces its historical origins to 1853, and has operated continuously on its present Gainesville campus since September 1906...

, FSU
Florida State University
The Florida State University is a space-grant and sea-grant public university located in Tallahassee, Florida, United States. It is a comprehensive doctoral research university with medical programs and significant research activity as determined by the Carnegie Foundation...

, and FAMU
Florida A&M University
Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, commonly known as Florida A&M or FAMU, is a historically black university located in Tallahassee, Florida, United States, the state capital, and is one of eleven member institutions of the State University System of Florida...

, respectively); in this accord, UM was founded as a white, coeducational institution.
The University began in earnest in 1925 when George E. Merrick
George E. Merrick
George Edgar Merrick was a real estate developer who is best known as the planner and builder of the city of Coral Gables, Florida in the 1920s, one of the first planned communities in the United States ....

, the founder of Coral Gables, gifted 160 acre (0.6474976 km²) and nearly $5 million dollars ($ million, adjusted for current inflation) to the effort. The University was chartered on April 18, 1925 by the Circuit Court for Dade County with an initial Board of Regents chaired by William E. Walsh, a Miami Beach
Miami Beach, Florida
Miami Beach is a coastal resort city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States, incorporated on March 26, 1915. The municipality is located on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and Biscayne Bay, the latter which separates the Beach from Miami city proper...

 municipal judge. By the fall of 1926, when the first class of 372 students enrolled at UM, the land boom had collapsed, and hopes for a speedy recovery were dashed by a major hurricane
1926 Miami Hurricane
The 1926 Miami hurricane was a Category 4 hurricane that devastated Miami in September 1926. The storm also caused significant damage in the Florida Panhandle, the U.S. state of Alabama, and the Bahamas...

. In the next 15 years the University barely remained solvent. The construction of the first building on campus, now known as the Merrick Building, was left half built for over two decades due to economic difficulties. In the meantime, classes were held at the nearby Anastasia Hotel, with partitions separating classrooms, giving the University the short-lived nickname of "Cardboard College."

In 1929, Walsh and the other members of the Board of Regents resigned in the wake of the collapse of the Florida economy. UM's plight was so severe that students went door to door in Coral Gables collecting funds to keep it open. A reconstituted ten-member Board was chaired by UM's first president Bowman Foster Ashe
Bowman Foster Ashe
Bowman Foster Ashe was a U.S. educator who served as the first president of the University of Miami.Ashe attended Mount Union College and then transferred to the University of Pittsburgh were he earned a Bachelor of Science degree In 1910. After graduation, he took a job teaching English and...

 (1926–1952). The new board included Merrick, Theodore Dickinson, E.B. Douglas, David Fairchild
David Fairchild
David Grandison Fairchild was an American botanist and plant explorer. Fairchild was responsible for the introduction of more than 200,000 exotic plants and varieties of established crops into the United States, including soybeans, pistachios, mangos, nectarines, dates, bamboos, and flowering...

, James H. Gilman, Richardson Saunders, Frank B. Shutts, Joseph H. Adams, and J. C. Penney. In 1930, several faculty members and more than 60 students came to UM when the University of Havana
University of Havana
The University of Havana or UH is a university located in the Vedado district of Havana, Cuba. Founded in 1728, the University of Havana is the oldest university in Cuba, and one of the first to be founded in the Americas...

 closed due to political unrest. UM filed for bankruptcy in 1932. In July 1934, the University of Miami was reincorporated and a Board of Trustees replaced the Board of Regents. By 1940, community leaders were replacing faculty and administration as trustees. The University survived this early turmoil. During Ashe's presidency, the University added the School of Law
University of Miami School of Law
The University of Miami School of Law, founded in 1926, is the law school of the University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States. The school graduated its first class of 13 students in 1929.- Academics :...

 (1928), the School of Business Administration
University of Miami School of Business Administration
The University of Miami School of Business Administration is an academic unit within the University of Miami located in Coral Gables, Florida. It was founded in 1929. It offers undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, Ph.D. and non-degree executive education programs...

 (1929), the School of Education (1929), the Graduate School (1941), the Marine Laboratory (1943, renamed in 1969 as the Rosenstiel School
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is a college and research institute for the study of oceanography and the atmospheric sciences within the University of Miami . It is located on a 16 acre campus on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida, USA...

), the School of Engineering (1947), and the School of Medicine
Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is the school of medical education of the University of Miami. The main medical campus is located in the Civic Center, Miami, Florida within the UM/Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex...

 (1952).
During World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

, UM was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program
V-12 Navy College Training Program
The V-12 Navy College Training Program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II...

, which offered students a path to a Navy
United States Navy
The United States Navy is the naval warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. The U.S. Navy is the largest in the world; its battle fleet tonnage is greater than that of the next 13 largest navies combined. The U.S...

 commission.

One of Ashe's longtime assistants, Jay F. W. Pearson
Jay F. W. Pearson
Jay F. W. Pearson was a marine biologist and university administrator.A charter faculty member of the University of Miami as a marine biologist. President Ashe recruited Pearson from the University of Pittsburgh. As one of Ashe's longtime assistants, Pearson was positioned to succeed Ashe as...

, assumed the presidency in 1952. A charter faculty member and a marine biologist by trade, Pearson retained the position until 1962. During his presidency, UM awarded its first doctorate degrees and saw an increase in enrollment of more than 4,000.

The social changes of the 1960s and 1970s were reflected at UM. In 1961, UM dropped its policy of racial segregation and began to admit black American
African American
African Americans are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa and are the direct descendants of enslaved Africans within the boundaries of the present United States...

 students. African Americans were also allowed full participation in student activities and sports teams. After President Stanford pressed for minority athletes, in December 1966, UM signed Ray Bellamy, an African American football player. With Bellamy, UM became the first major college in the Deep South with a Black football player on scholarship. UM established an Office of Minority Affairs to promote diversity in both undergraduate and professional school admissions. With the start of the 1968 football season, President Henry Stanford barred the playing of "Dixie
Dixie (song)
Countless lyrical variants of "Dixie" exist, but the version attributed to Dan Emmett and its variations are the most popular. Emmett's lyrics as they were originally intended reflect the mood of the United States in the late 1850s toward growing abolitionist sentiment. The song presented the point...

" by the University's band.

Historically, UM regulated female student conduct more than men's conduct with a staff under the Dean of Women watching over the women. UM combined the separate Dean of Men and Dean of Women positions in 1971. In 1971, UM formed a Women's Commission which issued a 1974 report on the status of women on campus. The result was UM's first female commencement speaker, day care, and a Women's Study minor. Following the enactment of Title IX
Title IX
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a United States law, enacted on June 23, 1972, that amended Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In 2002 it was renamed the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act, in honor of its principal author Congresswoman Mink, but is most...

 in 1972, and decades of litigation, all organizations, including honorary societies were open to women. The Women's Commission also sought more equitable funding for women's sports.

From 1961 to 1968, UM leased buildings on its South Campus to serve as the covert headquarters of the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
The Central Intelligence Agency is a civilian intelligence agency of the United States government. It is an executive agency and reports directly to the Director of National Intelligence, responsible for providing national security intelligence assessment to senior United States policymakers...

's JMWAVE
JMWAVE
JMWAVE or JM/WAVE or JM WAVE was the codename for a major secret United States covert operations and intelligence gathering station operated by the CIA from 1961 until 1968...

 operation against Fidel Castro
Fidel Castro
Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz is a Cuban revolutionary and politician, having held the position of Prime Minister of Cuba from 1959 to 1976, and then President from 1976 to 2008. He also served as the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba from the party's foundation in 1961 until 2011...

's government in Cuba
Cuba
The Republic of Cuba is an island nation in the Caribbean. The nation of Cuba consists of the main island of Cuba, the Isla de la Juventud, and several archipelagos. Havana is the largest city in Cuba and the country's capital. Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city...

. In 1968, after Ramparts
Ramparts (magazine)
Ramparts was an American political and literary magazine, published from 1962 through 1975.-History:Founded by Edward M. Keating as a Catholic literary quarterly, the magazine became closely associated with the New Left after executive editor Warren Hinckle hired Robert Scheer as managing editor...

magazine exposed CIA operations on other campuses, JMWAVE was moved off the UM campus out of concern for embarrassing the university.

Henry King Stanford
Henry King Stanford
Henry King Stanford was President of Georgia Southwestern College , President of Georgia State College for Women , President of Birmingham Southern College, the 3rd President of the University of Miami, and 19th President of the University of...

 became UM's third president in 1962. The Stanford presidency saw increased emphasis on research, reorganization of administrative structure and construction of new facilities. Among the new research centers established were the Center for Advanced International Studies (1964), the Institute of Molecular and Cellular Evolution (1964), the Center for Theoretical Studies (1965), and the Institute for the Study of Aging (1975). Under Stanford, in 1965, UM began to recruit international students.

In 1981, Edward T. Foote II
Edward T. Foote II
Edward Thaddeus “Tad” Foote II served as the fourth president of the University of Miami from 1981 through 2001.A graduate of John Burroughs School in St. Louis, Missouri, and Yale University, Foote served as dean of the law school at Washington University in St...

 became the school's fourth president. Under Foote's leadership, on campus student housing was converted into a system of residential colleges. In addition, Foote initiated a five-year $400 million fundraising campaign that began in 1984 and raised $517.5 million. He saw the endowment expand from $47.4 million in 1981 to $465.2 million in 2000.

Foote was succeeded by Donna Shalala
Donna Shalala
Donna Edna Shalala served for eight years as Secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton and has been president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida, since 2001. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest...

, who assumed the UM presidency in 2001. Under Shalala, Miami has built new libraries, dormitories, symphony rehearsal halls, and classroom buildings. The university's academic quality and student quality also have improved as a result. During Shalala's leadership of the University of Miami, Miami hosted one of three nationally televised U.S. presidential debates
United States presidential election debates, 2004
The United States presidential election debates were held in the 2004 presidential elections. Three debates were held between Republican incumbent George W. Bush and Democratic candidate John Kerry, the major candidates, and one debate was held with their vice presidential running mates, incumbent...

 of the 2004 U.S. Presidential election
United States presidential election, 2004
The United States presidential election of 2004 was the United States' 55th quadrennial presidential election. It was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2004. Republican Party candidate and incumbent President George W. Bush defeated Democratic Party candidate John Kerry, the then-junior U.S. Senator...

.

Starting in 2002, UM conducted a fundraising campaign titled "Momentum: The Campaign for the University of Miami" that ultimately raised $1.37 billion, the most money raised by any college in Florida . Of that amount, $854 million went to the medical campus. On November 30, 2007, UM acquired the Cedars Medical Center and renamed it the "University of Miami Hospital", giving the Miller School of Medicine an in-house teaching hospital rather than being merely affiliated with area hospitals.
On February 28, 2006, custodial workers at the University of Miami, who are contracted to the university by a Boston, Massachusetts-based company, UNICCO, began a strike
University of Miami 2006 custodial workers' strike
The University of Miami 2006 custodial workers' strike featured striking custodial workers at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States...

 prompted by allegations of unfair labor practices, substandard pay, lack of health benefits, and workplace safety. After students began a hunger strike and on-campus vigil, the strike was settled on May 1, 2006. The settlement resulted in a card count which lead to the recognition of the first union-represented bargaining unit at UM. UM raised wages from $6.40 to $8.35 per hour and provided health insurance.

In 2008-09, UM responded to the economic slowdown by tightening expenditures. While its endowment lost over 26.8% of its value, impacting endowment income, the school receives more than 98% of its operating budget from other sources.

Coral Gables campus

UM's main campus spans 260 acres (1.1 km²) in Coral Gables, located immediately south of the city of Miami. Most of the University of Miami's academic programs are located on the main campus in Coral Gables, which houses seven schools and two colleges including the University of Miami School of Law
University of Miami School of Law
The University of Miami School of Law, founded in 1926, is the law school of the University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States. The school graduated its first class of 13 students in 1929.- Academics :...

. The campus has over 5900000 sq ft (548,127.9 m²) of building space valued at over $657 million. Several other programs, including bilingual Continuing and International Education classes, are offered at the Koubek Center in Miami's Little Havana
Little Havana
Little Havana is a neighborhood of Miami, Florida, United States. Home to many Cuban immigrant residents, Little Havana is named after Havana, the capital and largest city in Cuba. The approximate boundaries are the Miami River , SW 16th Street , SR 9/West 27th Avenue and I-95...

, the James L. Knight Center in downtown Miami, and the South and Richmond campuses in southwest Miami-Dade county.

The university also has a campus theater, the Jerry Herman Ring Theatre
Jerry Herman Ring Theatre
The Jerry Herman Ring Theatre, located on the campus of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, United States, is the student theatre of the University of Miami....

, which is used for student plays and musicals. The John C. Gifford Arboretum
John C. Gifford Arboretum
The John C. Gifford Arboretum is an arboretum and botanical garden located at the northwest corner of the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida in the United States.-History:...

, a campus arboretum
Arboretum
An arboretum in a narrow sense is a collection of trees only. Related collections include a fruticetum , and a viticetum, a collection of vines. More commonly, today, an arboretum is a botanical garden containing living collections of woody plants intended at least partly for scientific study...

 and botanical garden
Botanical garden
A botanical garden The terms botanic and botanical, and garden or gardens are used more-or-less interchangeably, although the word botanic is generally reserved for the earlier, more traditional gardens. is a well-tended area displaying a wide range of plants labelled with their botanical names...

, is located on the northwest corner of the main campus in Coral Gables. The Jorge M. Perez Architecture Center is the gallery of the School of Architecture that displays exhibitions focusing on architecture and design.

The Coral Gables campus is served by the Miami Metrorail
Metrorail (Miami)
The Miami Metrorail, officially Metrorail and commonly called the Metro, is the heavy rail rapid transit system of Miami, Florida, United States, serving the Miami metropolitan area. The Metro is operated by Miami-Dade Transit, a departmental agency of Miami-Dade County...

 at the University Station
University (Metrorail station)
University is a Metrorail station in the suburban city of Coral Gables, Florida at the University of Miami , seven miles southwest of Downtown Miami....

. The Metro connects UM to Downtown Miami
Downtown Miami
Downtown Miami is an urban residential neighborhood, and the central business district of Miami, Miami-Dade County, and South Florida in the United States...

, Brickell, Coconut Grove, and other Miami neighborhoods. The UM campus is about a 15-minute train ride from Downtown and Brickell.

Student housing

UM residence halls Year built Room capacity
Apartment Area 1948 est. 500
Eaton Residential College 1954 400
Mahoney Residential College 1958 750
Pearson Residential College 1962 750
Hecht Residential College 1968 900
Stanford Residential College 1968 900
University Village 2006 800
Total 4,500 (29% of UM students)


The Coral Gables campus houses 4,500 enrolled students. This group is disproportionately freshmen (84% of new freshmen live on campus compared with 43% of all degree undergraduates). UM's on campus housing consists of five residential colleges and one apartment-style housing area available only to undergraduate degree seeking students. The residential colleges are divided into two dormitory
Dormitory
A dormitory, often shortened to dorm, in the United States is a residence hall consisting of sleeping quarters or entire buildings primarily providing sleeping and residential quarters for large numbers of people, often boarding school, college or university students...

-style residence halls and three suite-style residence halls. The McDonald and Pentland Towers of Hecht Residential College and the Walsh and Rosborough Towers of Stanford
Henry King Stanford
Henry King Stanford was President of Georgia Southwestern College , President of Georgia State College for Women , President of Birmingham Southern College, the 3rd President of the University of Miami, and 19th President of the University of...

 Residential College are commonly referred to as the "Freshman Towers", as the single-sex by floor (with shared bathroom facilities) co-ed dormitories generally house new students. Eaton Residential College, which originally housed only women, and the Mahoney/Pearson
Jay F. W. Pearson
Jay F. W. Pearson was a marine biologist and university administrator.A charter faculty member of the University of Miami as a marine biologist. President Ashe recruited Pearson from the University of Pittsburgh. As one of Ashe's longtime assistants, Pearson was positioned to succeed Ashe as...

 Residential Colleges have suite-style housing with every two double-occupancy rooms connected by a shared bathroom.

In addition to these five residential colleges, Miami also has an area called the University Village which consists of seven buildings with apartment
Apartment
An apartment or flat is a self-contained housing unit that occupies only part of a building...

-style annual contract
Contract
A contract is an agreement entered into by two parties or more with the intention of creating a legal obligation, which may have elements in writing. Contracts can be made orally. The remedy for breach of contract can be "damages" or compensation of money. In equity, the remedy can be specific...

 housing, fully furnished with kitchen facilities. The University Village is only open to juniors and seniors, but was previously open to graduate students and students of the School of Law up until July 31, 2009; after this date, there has been no housing available for any graduate students on the Coral Gables campus.

Miami previously had a series of seven buildings set aside for student residences called the Apartment Area, consisting of the oldest dormitories on campus which were originally built to house married veterans and their families. These buildings also featured fully furnished apartments with kitchen facilities, but were not leased to students as in the University Village. These residences were closed at the end of the Spring 2010 semester, although several others of these original dormitories continue to be used as office space for departments such as the Office of Student Employment, the Air Force ROTC Detachment 155, and the Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Education PIER 21.

The University of Miami does not offer housing for students with children or for married students. UM abolished its separate dorms for athletes in 1990.

Medical campus

The Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is the school of medical education of the University of Miami. The main medical campus is located in the Civic Center, Miami, Florida within the UM/Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex...

 campus, located near Downtown Miami
Downtown Miami
Downtown Miami is an urban residential neighborhood, and the central business district of Miami, Miami-Dade County, and South Florida in the United States...

 in the Civic Center
Civic Center (Miami)
Civic Center is a neighborhood in the city of Miami, Florida USA. The Civic Center is bound roughly by Northwest 20th Street and 14th Avenue to the northwest, the Dolphin Expressway and the Miami River to the south and west, and the Midtown Interchange and I-95 to the east.The Civic Center has the...

, trains 1,000 students in various health-related programs. It consists of 68 acre (275,186.5 m²) within the 153 acre (619,169.6 m²) University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex. The medical center includes three UM-owned hospitals: University of Miami Hospital, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital. Jackson Memorial Hospital
Jackson Memorial Hospital
Jackson Memorial Hospital is a non-profit, tertiary care teaching hospital and the major teaching hospital of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida...

, Holtz Children's Hospital, and the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center are also a part of the medical center and are affiliated with UM, but are not owned by UM. The heart of this campus is "The Alamo
Miami City Hospital, Building No. 1
The Miami City Hospital, Building No. 1 is a historic hospital in Miami, Florida. It is located at 1611 Northwest 12th Avenue. On December 31, 1979, it was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.-References:...

" - the original City of Miami Hospital, which opened in 1918, that is on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places is the United States government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation...

. In 2006, UM opened the 300000 sq ft (27,870.9 m²), 15-story Clinical Research Building and Wellness Center. In 2009, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design consists of a suite of rating systems for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings, homes and neighborhoods....

 (LEED) certified, nine-story Biomedical Research Building, a 182000 sq ft (16,908.4 m²) laboratory and office facility, opened to house the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute and the Miami Institute for Human Genomics. UM has started to build a 2000000 sq ft (185,806.1 m²) UM Life Science Park adjacent to the UM medical campus. These additional Gold LEED certified buildings are being built by Wexford Science & Technology, a private developer, on land leased from UM. The Medical campus is connected to UM's main campus by the Miami Metrorail with direct stations at University Station for the main campus, and Civic Center Station for the medical campus.

On December 1, 2007, the University purchased the Cedars Medical Center, renaming it as the University of Miami Hospital. Situated in the Miami Health District, the hospital is close to the Jackson Memorial Hospital, which has been used by the UM students and faculty to provide patient care for many years.

Starting in 2004, the Miller School began offering instruction on the campus of Florida Atlantic University
Florida Atlantic University
Florida Atlantic University, also referred to as FAU or Florida Atlantic, is a public, coeducational, research university located in , United States. The university has six satellite campuses located in the Florida cities of Dania Beach, Davie, Fort Lauderdale, Jupiter, Port St. Lucie, and in Fort...

 in Boca Raton, Florida
Boca Raton, Florida
Boca Raton is a city in Palm Beach County, Florida, USA, incorporated in May 1925. In the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 74,764; the 2006 population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau was 86,396. However, the majority of the people under the postal address of Boca Raton, about...

. MD candidates are admitted to either the Miami or Boca Raton programs and spend all four years studying on the selected campus. In April 2005, the Boca Raton program was expanded into a full four year medical degree program.

There is no on campus housing for students of the Miller School of Medicine in Miami or Boca Raton. The Miami and Boca Raton campuses charge identical tuition, with a lower tuition for in-state students.

Virginia Key campus

In 1945, construction began on the Rickenbacker Causeway
Rickenbacker Causeway
The Rickenbacker Causeway connects Miami, Florida, United States to the barrier islands of Virginia Key and Key Biscayne across Biscayne Bay.-Background:...

 to make Virginia Key
Virginia Key
Virginia Key is a barrier island in Miami, Florida, United States in Biscayne Bay, south of Brickell and north of Key Biscayne. It accessible from the mainland via the Rickenbacker Causeway....

 accessible by car. The county offered to give UM a part of the island adjacent to the Miami Seaquarium
Miami Seaquarium
The Miami Seaquarium is a oceanarium located on the island of Virginia Key in Biscayne Bay, Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States and is located near downtown Miami. It is the longest operating oceanarium in the United States. In addition to the marine mammals, the Miami Seaquarium also...

 in exchange for UM operating the aquarium. However, the aquarium construction was delayed when a bond referendum failed, so UM leased the land in 1951. In 1953, UM built classroom and lab buildings on a 16 acre (65,000 m²) campus on Virginia Key
Virginia Key
Virginia Key is a barrier island in Miami, Florida, United States in Biscayne Bay, south of Brickell and north of Key Biscayne. It accessible from the mainland via the Rickenbacker Causeway....

 in the City of Miami to house what became the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is a college and research institute for the study of oceanography and the atmospheric sciences within the University of Miami . It is located on a 16 acre campus on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida, USA...

. Additional buildings were added in 1957, 1959 and 1965. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration , pronounced , like "noah", is a scientific agency within the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere...

's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory
The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory , a federal research laboratory, is part of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research , located in Miami, Florida...

 is located across the Rickenbacker Causeway
Rickenbacker Causeway
The Rickenbacker Causeway connects Miami, Florida, United States to the barrier islands of Virginia Key and Key Biscayne across Biscayne Bay.-Background:...

 from the campus. From 1947 to 1959, the State of Florida funded the UM Marine Lab on Virginia Key until the State built a separate marine lab in St. Petersburg. In 2009, UM received a $15 million federal grant to help construct a new $43.8 million, 56500 square feet (5,249 m²) Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Research Building.

There is no housing on the Virginia Key campus. As part of its campus-wide free shuttle service, UM operates a route from the Coral Gables campus to the Virginia Key campus, which includes stops at the Vizcaya
Vizcaya (Metrorail station)
Vizcaya is a Metrorail station in The Roads neighborhood of Miami, Florida.The station is located near the intersection of Southwest First Avenue and 32nd Road, at the southern junction of I-95 and South Dixie Highway and two blocks southeast of Coral Way...

 Metrorail
Metrorail (Miami)
The Miami Metrorail, officially Metrorail and commonly called the Metro, is the heavy rail rapid transit system of Miami, Florida, United States, serving the Miami metropolitan area. The Metro is operated by Miami-Dade Transit, a departmental agency of Miami-Dade County...

 station on weekdays.

South Campus

In 1946, UM acquired the former Richmond Naval Air Station
Richmond Naval Air Station
The Richmond Naval Lighter Than Air Station was a military installation about 18 or 20 miles off Route 1 from South Miami, Florida. that was active during World War II....

, in southwestern Miami, located 12 mi (19.3 km) south of the main campus in order to accommodate the post-war increase in students. Its six buildings provide 63800 sq ft (5,927.2 m²) to currently house: the Global Public Health Research Group, Miami Institute for Human Genomics
Genomics
Genomics is a discipline in genetics concerning the study of the genomes of organisms. The field includes intensive efforts to determine the entire DNA sequence of organisms and fine-scale genetic mapping efforts. The field also includes studies of intragenomic phenomena such as heterosis,...

, Forensic Toxicology Laboratory (for analysis of DUI
DUI
DUI is a three letter acronym that may stand for:* Driving under the influence * Democratic Union for Integration — the largest ethnic Albanian party in the Republic of Macedonia* Data Use Identifier...

 suspect blood samples), and Microbiology
Microbiology
Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which are defined as any microscopic organism that comprises either a single cell , cell clusters or no cell at all . This includes eukaryotes, such as fungi and protists, and prokaryotes...

 and Immunology
Immunology
Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. It deals with the physiological functioning of the immune system in states of both health and diseases; malfunctions of the immune system in immunological disorders ; the...

. The campus was acquired immediately following World War II to accommodate about 1,100 students (mostly freshmen) with housing, dining and recreational facilities and classrooms for two academic years. From 1948 to present it has been used as a research facility and storage area. In the 1960s, some of the buildings were leased to the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
The Central Intelligence Agency is a civilian intelligence agency of the United States government. It is an executive agency and reports directly to the Director of National Intelligence, responsible for providing national security intelligence assessment to senior United States policymakers...

. The South Campus Grove was a 350 acre (1,416,401 m²) plot for agricultural research and horticultural studies that was established in 1948. For 20 years, UM used radioactive isotope
Isotope
Isotopes are variants of atoms of a particular chemical element, which have differing numbers of neutrons. Atoms of a particular element by definition must contain the same number of protons but may have a distinct number of neutrons which differs from atom to atom, without changing the designation...

s in biological research on the South Campus, and buried materials, included irradiated animals on the site. In August 2006, UM agreed to reimburse the Army Corps of Engineers $393,473 for clean-up costs under the Superfund
Superfund
Superfund is the common name for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 , a United States federal law designed to clean up sites contaminated with hazardous substances...

 law.

The Richmond campus is a 76 acre (307,561.4 m²) site near South Campus that was formerly the United States Naval Observatory
United States Naval Observatory
The United States Naval Observatory is one of the oldest scientific agencies in the United States, with a primary mission to produce Positioning, Navigation, and Timing for the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Department of Defense...

 Secondary National Time Standard Facility, which already had buildings and a 20M antenna used for Very Long Baseline Interferometry
Very Long Baseline Interferometry
Very Long Baseline Interferometry is a type of astronomical interferometry used in radio astronomy. It allows observations of an object that are made simultaneously by many telescopes to be combined, emulating a telescope with a size equal to the maximum separation between the telescopes.Data...

 (VLBI). The Rosenstiel School’s Center for Southeastern Tropical Advanced Remote Sensing (CSTARS) and Richmond Satellite Operations Center (RSOC) have research facilities located on a portion of the new campus.

Sustainability

Since 2005, UM has a "Green U" initiative which includes LEED certification for buildings and the use of biofuels by the campus bus fleet. UM established the Abess
Leonard L. Abess
Leonard Abess is a United States banker who sold his own company, City National Bank of Florida for $945 million and gave his staff a bonus. He shared $60 million between them....

 Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. As a part of the Abess Center, UM launched the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program to educate students on the importance of protecting the marine environment. In 2008, UM replaced the chiller plant on its Virginia Key campus to improve its carbon footprint. UM also planted mangrove
Mangrove
Mangroves are various kinds of trees up to medium height and shrubs that grow in saline coastal sediment habitats in the tropics and subtropics – mainly between latitudes N and S...

s, sea grape
Sea grape
The name sea grape or seagrape can refer to the tunicates, as well as several different groups of plants:* Coccoloba uvifera, a flowering plant native to North, East, and West America* Seaweeds in the genus Caulerpa, especially:...

 trees, and other dune plants on Virginia Key to protect its sand dunes and to protect the campus from storm damage.
UM received a "C+" grade on the 2009 College Sustainability Report Card and a "B-" for 2010 for its environmental and sustainability initiatives.

Student body

University of Miami demographics
Ethnic enrollment, 2010 Undergraduates Graduates
Black
African American
African Americans are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa and are the direct descendants of enslaved Africans within the boundaries of the present United States...

8% 8%
Asian
Asian American
Asian Americans are Americans of Asian descent. The U.S. Census Bureau definition of Asians as "Asian” refers to a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent, including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan,...

10% 14%
Hispanic
Hispanic
Hispanic is a term that originally denoted a relationship to Hispania, which is to say the Iberian Peninsula: Andorra, Gibraltar, Portugal and Spain. During the Modern Era, Hispanic sometimes takes on a more limited meaning, particularly in the United States, where the term means a person of ...

 (of any race)
29% 22%
White (non-Hispanic)
White American
White Americans are people of the United States who are considered or consider themselves White. The United States Census Bureau defines White people as those "having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa...

51% 55%
Total 100% 100%

There were 21,845 applications for the fall 2009 freshman class, with 9,700 accepted and 2,006 enrolled. The mean SAT scores and high school GPAs for entering freshmen were the highest ever. The yield rate (percentage of accepted students who chose to attend UM over other schools where they are also accepted) for new freshmen was 21%, which was down from 2008 (24%). The 2009 yield rate for new transfers was 43%.

In 2010, undergraduates were composed of: 32% from the Greater Miami area, 12% from other parts of Florida
Florida
Florida is a state in the southeastern United States, located on the nation's Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It is bordered to the west by the Gulf of Mexico, to the north by Alabama and Georgia and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of 18,801,310 as measured by the 2010 census, it...

, 44% from other U.S. states, and 11% were foreign students. Graduates were composed of: 34% from the Greater Miami area, 16% from other parts of Florida, 37% from other U.S. states, and 13% were foreign students.

In 2009, the average SAT score of UM's incoming freshmen class was 1285, which is a 10 point increase from last year and a 110 point rise since 2001. Further, 40% of UM students ranked in the top 5% of their high school
High school
High school is a term used in parts of the English speaking world to describe institutions which provide all or part of secondary education. The term is often incorporated into the name of such institutions....

 class.

, UM graduation rates had 64.1% graduating within 4 years, 75.1% graduating within 5 years, and 76.8% graduating within 6 years. Male student athletes have a 52% 4-year graduation rate, and 72% of female student athletes graduate within 4 years.

Academics

Fall freshman statistics
  2010 20092008 2007 2006 2005
Applicants 25,895 21,845 21,774 19,807 19,031 18,810
Admits 10,157 8,411 7,527 7,704 8,678
% Admitted 39.2 44.4 38.6 38.0 40.4 46.1
This table does not account deferred
applications or other unique situations.


There are currently 2,505 full-time faculty members, 91% of whom hold doctorates or terminal degrees in their field. UM has a student-faculty ratio of 11:1. The University of Miami is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools is one of the six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation...

 and 23 additional professional and educational accrediting agencies. It is a member of the American Association of University Women
American Association of University Women
The American Association of University Women advances equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, and research. It was founded in 1882 by Ellen Swallow Richards and Marion Talbot...

, the American Council on Education
American Council on Education
The American Council on Education is a United States organization, established in 1918, comprising over 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations....

, the American Council of Learned Societies
American Council of Learned Societies
The American Council of Learned Societies , founded in 1919, is a private nonprofit federation of seventy scholarly organizations.ACLS is best known as a funder of humanities research through fellowships and grants awards. ACLS Fellowships are designed to permit scholars holding the Ph.D...

, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, the Florida Association of Colleges and Universities, the Independent Colleges & Universities of Florida, and the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is an organization of private US colleges and universities...

.

Organization

UM is led by a Board of Trustees, which holds two meetings each year. The Board has 48 elected members, 3 alumni representatives, 23 senior members, 4 national members, 6 ex-officio members, 14 emeriti members, and 1 student representative. Ex-officio members, who serve by virtue of their positions in the University, include the President of the University, the President and Immediate Past President of the Citizens Board, and the President, President-Elect, and Immediate Past President of the Alumni Association. Since 1982, the Board has eleven visiting committees, which include both Trustees and outside experts, to help oversee the individual academic units.

UM's President, currently Donna Shalala
Donna Shalala
Donna Edna Shalala served for eight years as Secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton and has been president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida, since 2001. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest...

, is the university's chief executive officer with a salary of $783,420, ($1.2 million in total 2008 compensation) and each academic unit is headed by a Dean.
2009-2010 Tuition
SchoolTuitionTotal Cost
Undergraduate $35,540 $52,044
Graduate School $26,640 $44,968
Law School $37,418 $54,022
Medical School (FL) $29,289
Medical School (non-FL) $38,504


Undergraduate & Graduate
  • School of Architecture
    Architecture
    Architecture is both the process and product of planning, designing and construction. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural and political symbols and as works of art...

  • College of Arts and Sciences
    Liberal arts
    The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

  • School of Business Administration
    University of Miami School of Business Administration
    The University of Miami School of Business Administration is an academic unit within the University of Miami located in Coral Gables, Florida. It was founded in 1929. It offers undergraduate business, full-time MBA, Executive MBA, MS, Ph.D. and non-degree executive education programs...

  • School of Communication
    Communication studies
    Communication Studies is an academic field that deals with processes of communication, commonly defined as the sharing of symbols over distances in space and time. Hence, communication studies encompasses a wide range of topics and contexts ranging from face-to-face conversation to speeches to mass...

  • School of Education
    Education
    Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts...

  • College of Engineering
    Engineering education
    Engineering education is the activity of teaching knowledge and principles related to the professional practice of engineering. It includes the initial education for becoming an engineer and any advanced education and specialization that follow...

  • Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
    Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
    The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is a college and research institute for the study of oceanography and the atmospheric sciences within the University of Miami . It is located on a 16 acre campus on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida, USA...

  • Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music
    Frost School of Music
    The Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music or Frost School of Music of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, known from 1926 to 2003 as University of Miami School of Music, is a music school in the United States....

  • School of Nursing
    Nursing
    Nursing is a healthcare profession focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life from conception to death....

     and Health Studies

Graduate only
  • The Graduate School
  • Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
    Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
    The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is the school of medical education of the University of Miami. The main medical campus is located in the Civic Center, Miami, Florida within the UM/Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex...

  • University of Miami School of Law
    University of Miami School of Law
    The University of Miami School of Law, founded in 1926, is the law school of the University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States. The school graduated its first class of 13 students in 1929.- Academics :...



In addition, UM also has a Division of Continuing and International Education and a program in Executive Education as part of the School of Business Administration.

The Graduate School does not have a separate faculty, but rather coordinates the faculties from the other schools and colleges with respect to master and doctorate degree program. A partnership with nearby Florida International University
Florida International University
Florida International University is an American public research university in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States, with its main campus in University Park...

 also allow students from both schools to take graduate classes at either university, allowing graduate students to take a wider variety of courses. In addition, the Miller School of Medicine offers separate PhD and MD/PhD programs in several biomedical sciences.

The Department of Community Service
UM Department of Community Service
The UM Department of Community Service is a student-run organization at the University of Miami's Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine....

, staffed by volunteer medical students and physicians from UM's Leonard M. School of Medicine, provides free medical and other community services in Miami and surrounding communities.

For the fiscal year ending May 2008, UM had $2,048,588,166 in total revenues and $1,992,907,677 in functional expenses with the excess going to endowment or other fund accounts.

Rankings

Other UM Rankings
CMUP
Center for Measuring University Performance
The Center for Measuring University Performance is a research center at Arizona State University. The Center is best known for an annual report it produces, The Top American Research Universities, that ranks American universities on nine different measures: Total Research, Federal Research,...

Research Universities
78
USNWR Earth Sciences 43
USNWR Fine Arts 119
Wuhan International ESI 106
USNWR Clinical Psychology 25


In the 2012 issue of U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories...

s "America's Best Colleges," the University of Miami was ranked 38th among national universities, the highest ranked in Florida. U.S. Newss 2010 ranking of U.S. medical schools ranked the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine
The University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is the school of medical education of the University of Miami. The main medical campus is located in the Civic Center, Miami, Florida within the UM/Jackson Memorial Medical Center complex...

 as the 47th best medical school in the nation, while US News ranked the School of Law
University of Miami School of Law
The University of Miami School of Law, founded in 1926, is the law school of the University of Miami, located in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States. The school graduated its first class of 13 students in 1929.- Academics :...

 as the 77th best law school in the nation. In 2008, U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories...

ranked the University of Miami Physical Therapy Department 7th in the nation and the Department of Psychology's Clinical Training Program 25th in the nation.

The National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. Its medical counterpart is the National Institutes of Health...

 ranks UM 112th out of 630 research institutions in the number of granted doctorate degrees in its FY 2006 survey. It ranked 79th out of 630 in terms of total research expenditures.

The Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
The Academic Ranking of World Universities , commonly known as the Shanghai ranking, is a publication that was founded and compiled by the Shanghai Jiaotong University to rank universities globally. The rankings have been conducted since 2003 and updated annually...

 rates UM one of the world's top 150 academic institutions In Forbes Magazines 2010 rankings of 600 undergraduate institutions, UM ranked 293rd.

In the 2009 edition of Best 371 Colleges, The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review
The Princeton Review is an American-based standardized test preparation and admissions consulting company. The Princeton Review operates in 41 states and 22 countries across the globe. It offers test preparation for standardized aptitude tests such as the SAT and advice regarding college...

 ranks UM one of the 141 "Best Southeastern Colleges" and ranks it first in the nation in its "Lots of Race/Class Interaction" category.

Libraries

The Otto G. Richter Library, the University of Miami's main library, houses collections that serve the arts, architecture, humanities, social sciences, and the sciences. It is a depository for federal and state government publications. Rare books, maps, manuscript collections, and the University of Miami Archives are housed in the Special Collections Division and in the Cuban Heritage Collection.

In addition to the Richter Library, the Libraries include facilities that support programs in architecture, business, marine science, and music:
  • Judi Prokop Newman Information Resources Center (Business)
  • Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library
  • Paul Buisson Reference Library (Architecture)
  • Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Library


The University also has specialized libraries for medicine and law:
  • Louis Calder Memorial Library (Medicine)
  • University of Miami Law Library


Within the Miller School of Medicine, there are two specialized departmental libraries for ophthalmology and psychiatry that are open to the public:
  • Mary and Edward Norton Library (Ophthalmology)
  • Pomerance Library (Psychiatry)


Combined holdings of the libraries include over 3.3 million volumes, 77,159 current serials titles, 67,894 electronic journals, 550,974 electronic books, 4 million microfroms, and 153,700 audio, film, video, and cartographic materials. The Libraries has a staff of 37 Librarians and 86 support staff.

Research

Sponsored research expenditures for fiscal year 2008 reached a record of more than $326 million. Those funds support over 5,000 graduate students and postdoctoral trainees. In Fiscal Year 2006, UM received $127 million in federal research funding, including $89.5 million from the Department of Health and Human Services and $16.7 million from the National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. Its medical counterpart is the National Institutes of Health...

. Of the $8.2 billion appropriated by Congress in 2009 as a part of the stimulus bill for research priorities of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
The National Institutes of Health are an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and are the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. Its science and engineering counterpart is the National Science Foundation...

, the Miller School received $40.5 million. In addition to research conducted in the individual academic schools and departments, Miami has the following University-wide research centers:
  • The Center for Hemispheric Policy
  • The Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies (ICCAS)
  • Leonard and Jayne Abess
    Leonard L. Abess
    Leonard Abess is a United States banker who sold his own company, City National Bank of Florida for $945 million and gave his staff a bonus. He shared $60 million between them....

     Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy
  • The Miami European Union Center: This group is a consortium with Florida International University
    Florida International University
    Florida International University is an American public research university in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States, with its main campus in University Park...

     (FIU) established in Fall 2001 with a grant from the European Commission
    European Commission
    The European Commission is the executive body of the European Union. The body is responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the Union's treaties and the general day-to-day running of the Union....

     through its delegation in Washington, D.C., intended to research economic, social, and political issues of interest to the European Union
    European Union
    The European Union is an economic and political union of 27 independent member states which are located primarily in Europe. The EU traces its origins from the European Coal and Steel Community and the European Economic Community , formed by six countries in 1958...

    .
  • The Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies
  • John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics - studies possible causes of Parkinson's disease
    Parkinson's disease
    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system...

    , Alzheimer's disease
    Alzheimer's disease
    Alzheimer's disease also known in medical literature as Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia. There is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death...

     and macular degeneration
    Macular degeneration
    Age-related macular degeneration is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field because of damage to the retina. It occurs in “dry” and “wet” forms. It is a major cause of blindness and visual impairment in older adults...

    .
  • Center on Research and Education for Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE)
  • Wallace H. Coulter Center for Translational Research


The Miller Medical School has more than more than $200 million per year in external grants and contracts to fund 1,500 ongoing projects. The medical campus includes more than 500000 sq ft (46,451.5 m²) of research space with plans underway to build a new UM Life Science Park, which will add an additional 2000000 sq ft (185,806.1 m²) of space adjacent to the medical campus. UM's Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute seeks to understand the biology of stem cells and translate basic research into new regenerative therapies. In 2007, Joshua Hare, MD and colleagues reported that a new stem cell therapy was safe for the treatment of myocardial infarction and reduced complications from the condition.

As of 2008, the Rosenstiel School receives $50 million in annual external research funding. Their laboratories include a salt-water wave tank, a five-tank Conditioning and Spawning System, multi-tank Aplysia Culture Laboratory, Controlled Corals Climate Tanks, and DNA analysis equipment. The campus also houses an invertebrate museum with 400,000 specimens, and operates the Bimini Biological Field Station, an array of oceanographic high-frequency radar along the US east coast, and the Bermuda aerosol observatory. UM also owns the Little Salt Spring
Little Salt Spring
Little Salt Spring is an archaeological and paleontological site in North Port, Florida, United States. It is located directly off Price Boulevard between US 41 and I-75 adjacent to Heron Creek Middle School U.S. Route 41 in the city of North Port...

, a site on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places is the United States government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation...

, in North Port, Florida
North Port, Florida
North Port is a city in southern Sarasota County, Florida, United States. The population was 22,797 at the 2000 census. As of 2007, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 54,308. It is part of the Bradenton–Sarasota–Venice Metropolitan Statistical Area...

, where RSMAS performs archaeological
Archaeology
Archaeology, or archeology , is the study of human society, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data that they have left behind, which includes artifacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes...

 and paleontological
Paleontology
Paleontology "old, ancient", ὄν, ὀντ- "being, creature", and λόγος "speech, thought") is the study of prehistoric life. It includes the study of fossils to determine organisms' evolution and interactions with each other and their environments...

 research.

UM is building a brain imaging
Neuroimaging
Neuroimaging includes the use of various techniques to either directly or indirectly image the structure, function/pharmacology of the brain...

 annex to the James M. Cox Jr. Science Center within the College of Arts and Sciences. The building will include a human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) laboratory, where scientists, clinicians and engineers can study fundamental aspects of brain function. Construction of the lab is funded in part by a $14.8 million in stimulus money grant from the National Institute of Health.

In 2004, UM, which received a total of $124 million in science and engineering (S&E) funding from the U.S. federal government, was the largest Hispanic-serving recipient and also ranked 54th in Federal S&E obligations among all universities. Three-fourths of that university's Federal S&E funds, $92 million, came from the Department of Health and Human Services, largely for its medical campus.

Student life

The University is affiliated with 31 fraternities and sororities
Fraternities and sororities
Fraternities and sororities are fraternal social organizations for undergraduate students. In Latin, the term refers mainly to such organizations at colleges and universities in the United States, although it is also applied to analogous European groups also known as corporations...

. Six of them (Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Epsilon Pi
Alpha Epsilon Pi , the Global Jewish college fraternity, has 155 active chapters in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Israel with a membership of over 9,000 undergraduates...

, Lambda Chi Alpha
Lambda Chi Alpha
Lambda Chi Alpha is one of the largest men's secret general fraternities in North America, having initiated more than 280,000 members and held chapters at more than 300 universities. It is a member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference and was founded by Warren A. Cole, while he was a...

, Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Kappa Phi
Pi Kappa Phi is an American social fraternity. It was founded by Andrew Alexander Kroeg, Jr., Lawrence Harry Mixson, and Simon Fogarty, Jr. on December 10, 1904 at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina...

, Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Alpha Epsilon is a North American Greek-letter social college fraternity founded at the University of Alabama on March 9, 1856. Of all existing national social fraternities today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only one founded in the Antebellum South...

, Sigma Chi
Sigma Chi
Sigma Chi is the largest and one of the oldest college Greek-letter secret and social fraternities in North America with 244 active chapters and more than . Sigma Chi was founded on June 28, 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio when members split from Delta Kappa Epsilon...

, and Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Beta Tau
Zeta Beta Tau was founded in 1898 as the nation's first Jewish fraternity, although it is no longer sectarian. Today the merged Zeta Beta Tau Brotherhood is one of the largest, numbering over 140,000 initiated Brothers, and over 90 chapter locations.-Founding:The Zeta Beta Tau fraternity was...

) have houses on campus. Among the service groups organized by students are Amnesty International
Amnesty International
Amnesty International is an international non-governmental organisation whose stated mission is "to conduct research and generate action to prevent and end grave abuses of human rights, and to demand justice for those whose rights have been violated."Following a publication of Peter Benenson's...

 and Habitat for Humanity. Students organize the Ibis yearbook, UMTV (a cable TV channel carried on Comcast
Comcast
Comcast Corporation is the largest cable operator, home Internet service provider, and fourth largest home telephone service provider in the United States, providing cable television, broadband Internet, and telephone service to both residential and commercial customers in 39 states and the...

 Channel 96, which includes nine programs, many of which have won national awards), UniMiami (a Spanish-speaking Cable TV broadcast), and the campus radio
Campus radio
Campus radio is a type of radio station that is run by the students of a college, university or other educational institution. Programming may be exclusively by students, or may include programmers from the wider community in which the radio station is based...

 station WVUM
WVUM
WVUM is a non-commercial college radio broadcasting an eclectic radio format with a focus on new and electronic music not played on commercial radio stations in the area. Licensed to Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States, the station serves the University of Miami and the surrounding Coral...

.

Since 1929, students have published The Miami Hurricane
The Miami Hurricane
The Miami Hurricane, founded in 1929, is the official student newspaper at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida, in the United States. It is published twice weekly by a staff of mostly undergraduate students...

newspaper twice-weekly. The paper has been honored in the Associated Collegiate Press
Associated Collegiate Press
The Associated Collegiate Press is the largest and oldest national membership organization for college student media in the United States. The ACP is a division of the National Scholastic Press Association...

 Hall of Fame.

UM has appointed individuals in the various departments to handle students' problems and complaints called "Troubleshooters." UM also has an Ombudsman
Ombudsman
An ombudsman is a person who acts as a trusted intermediary between an organization and some internal or external constituency while representing not only but mostly the broad scope of constituent interests...

 to mediate complaints that cannot be resolved by the troubleshooters. Since 1986, UM has a Honor Code governing student conduct.

The University has a number of student honor societies, including the Iron Arrow Honor Society
Iron Arrow Honor Society
The Iron Arrow Honor Society is a highly selective secret society and honor society at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida for students, faculty, staff and alumni...

 (which also inducts faculty, staff and alumni), and a chapter of Mortar Board
Mortar Board
Mortar Board is an American national honor society whose purpose is to recognize outstanding students dedicated to the values of scholarship, leadership, and service. The Cornell University Der Hexenkreis chapter, founded in 1892, is the oldest and predates the national society's founding in 1918...

. In 1959, the Order of Omega
Order of Omega
The Order of Omega is an undergraduate Greek society recognizing "fraternity men and women who have attained a high standard of leadership in inter-fraternity activities." It functions as an adjunct to traditional fraternal organizations, rather than a social or professional group in se...

 was founded at UM, and it remained a one-campus honorary until 1964. It is now a national honorary for fraternity and sorority members with a chapter continuing at UM.

Athletics

The university fields 15 athletic teams. Men's teams compete in baseball
Baseball
Baseball is a bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of nine players each. The aim is to score runs by hitting a thrown ball with a bat and touching a series of four bases arranged at the corners of a ninety-foot diamond...

, basketball
Basketball
Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules...

, cross-country
Cross country running
Cross country running is a sport in which people run a race on open-air courses over natural terrain. The course, typically long, may include surfaces of grass and earth, pass through woodlands and open country, and include hills, flat ground and sometimes gravel road...

, diving
Diving
Diving is the sport of jumping or falling into water from a platform or springboard, sometimes while performing acrobatics. Diving is an internationally-recognized sport that is part of the Olympic Games. In addition, unstructured and non-competitive diving is a recreational pastime.Diving is one...

, football
American football
American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

, tennis
Tennis
Tennis is a sport usually played between two players or between two teams of two players each . Each player uses a racket that is strung to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponent's court. Tennis is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society at all...

, and track and field
Track and field
Track and field is a sport comprising various competitive athletic contests based around the activities of running, jumping and throwing. The name of the sport derives from the venue for the competitions: a stadium which features an oval running track surrounding a grassy area...

. Women's teams compete in basketball
Basketball
Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules...

, cross-country, diving
Diving
Diving is the sport of jumping or falling into water from a platform or springboard, sometimes while performing acrobatics. Diving is an internationally-recognized sport that is part of the Olympic Games. In addition, unstructured and non-competitive diving is a recreational pastime.Diving is one...

, golf
Golf
Golf is a precision club and ball sport, in which competing players use many types of clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a golf course using the fewest number of strokes....

, rowing
Sport rowing
Rowing is a sport in which athletes race against each other on rivers, on lakes or on the ocean, depending upon the type of race and the discipline. The boats are propelled by the reaction forces on the oar blades as they are pushed against the water...

, soccer, swimming
Swimming (sport)
Swimming is a sport governed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation .-History: Competitive swimming in Europe began around 1800 BCE, mostly in the form of the freestyle. In 1873 Steve Bowyer introduced the trudgen to Western swimming competitions, after copying the front crawl used by Native...

, tennis
Tennis
Tennis is a sport usually played between two players or between two teams of two players each . Each player uses a racket that is strung to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponent's court. Tennis is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society at all...

, track and field
Track and field
Track and field is a sport comprising various competitive athletic contests based around the activities of running, jumping and throwing. The name of the sport derives from the venue for the competitions: a stadium which features an oval running track surrounding a grassy area...

, and volleyball
Volleyball
Volleyball is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.The complete rules are extensive...

.

Since 2004, the university's sports teams (nicknamed the Hurricanes
Miami Hurricanes
The Miami Hurricanes, of Coral Gables, Florida, are the varsity sports teams of the University of Miami. They compete in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference . The university fields 15 athletic teams for 17 varsity sports...

) compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference
Atlantic Coast Conference
The Atlantic Coast Conference is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. Founded in 1953 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the ACC sanctions competition in twenty-five sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its twelve member universities...

. The football
College football
College football refers to American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities...

 program was named national champion five times (1983
1983 Miami Hurricanes football team
The 1983 Miami Hurricanes were the national champions of the 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season. The national championship was the first of five won by the University of Miami.-Offense:-Defense:-Special teams:-Coaching staff:-Schedule:...

, 1987
1987 Miami Hurricanes football team
The 1987 Miami Hurricanes were the national champions of the 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season. The national championship was the second of five won by the University of Miami in football.-Pre-Season:...

, 1989
1989 Miami Hurricanes football team
The 1989 Miami Hurricanes were the national champions of the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. The national championship was the third won by the University of Miami in football.-Offense:-Defense:-Special Teams:-Schedule:...

, 1991
1991 Miami Hurricanes football team
The 1991 Miami Hurricanes were the national champions of the 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season, as determined by the AP Poll. 1991 was a split championship year, though, as the Washington Huskies finished #1 in the Coaches' Poll...

, and 2001
2001 Miami Hurricanes football team
The 2001 Miami Hurricanes football team was the national champion of the 2001 college football season and is considered by many to be the greatest team in college football history.-Pre-season motivation:...

.) The football team was named in the AP Top 25
AP Poll
The Associated Press College Poll refers to weekly rankings of the top 25 NCAA teams in one of three Division I college sports: football, men's basketball and women's basketball. The rankings are compiled by polling sportswriters across the nation...

 frequently during the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s and many players
Miami Hurricanes in the NFL
The University of Miami's football program has set multiple records in producing players who go on to the National Football League. The Hurricanes hold the record for most players selected in the first round in a single draft , most first-round draft picks in a two-year period , most first-round...

 are drafted into the NFL
National Football League
The National Football League is the highest level of professional American football in the United States, and is considered the top professional American football league in the world. It was formed by eleven teams in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing...

 each year. The UM football team is coached currently by Al Golden.

For 70 years, from 1937 through 2007, the Hurricanes played most field home games at the Miami Orange Bowl
Miami Orange Bowl
The Orange Bowl, formerly Burdine Stadium, was an outdoor athletic stadium in Miami, Florida, west of downtown in Little Havana. Considered a landmark, it was the home stadium for the Miami Hurricanes college football team...

. Beginning with the 2008 season, the University of Miami began playing its home football games at Sun Life Stadium (recently renamed from Dolphin Stadium) in Miami Gardens
Miami Gardens, Florida
Miami Gardens is a Miami suburban city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The city name comes from one of the major roadways through the area, Miami Gardens Drive. According to the 2010 U.S...

. The university signed a 25-year contract to play there through 2033. A smaller facility, Cobb Stadium
Cobb Stadium
Cobb Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium located on the University of Miami campus in Coral Gables, Florida. The stadium is home to the women's soccer and men's and women's track and field teams. The stadium was dedicated in 1999. It is named after former UM Chairman of the Board, Charles...

, is located on the University of Miami campus and is used by the university's women's soccer and men's and women's track and field
Track and field
Track and field is a sport comprising various competitive athletic contests based around the activities of running, jumping and throwing. The name of the sport derives from the venue for the competitions: a stadium which features an oval running track surrounding a grassy area...

 teams. UM's men's and women's basketball teams play their home games at BankUnited Center
BankUnited Center
The BankUnited Center is a 8,000-seat multi-purpose arena on the campus of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. The venue hosts concerts, family shows, trade shows, lecture series, university events and sporting events, including all University of Miami men's and women's basketball...

 on the Coral Gables campus. The UM baseball team is coached by Jim Morris
Jim Morris (baseball coach)
Jim Morris is head baseball coach at the University of Miami and previously at Georgia Tech. His teams have qualified for NCAA Regionals for the last 24 years, 15 at Miami and nine at Georgia Tech...

. The Miami baseball team has won four national championships (1982, 1985, 1999, 2001) and it plays their home games at the on-campus stadium Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field.

The University of Miami's mascot is Sebastian the Ibis
Sebastian the Ibis
Sebastian the Ibis is the official mascot for the University of Miami. He is an anthropomorphized American White Ibis with a Miami Hurricanes football jersey, number 0.-History:...

. Its marching band
Marching band
Marching band is a physical activity in which a group of instrumental musicians generally perform outdoors and incorporate some type of marching with their musical performance. Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwinds, and percussion instruments...

 is the Band of the Hour
Band of the Hour
The Frost Band of the Hour is the marching band at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. The band plays at all home football games and one away game. It also travels to post-season football bowl games in years that the football team plays at one. The university also has separate...

.

Notable alumni

Alumni of the University of Miami include entertainers such as actor
Actor
An actor is a person who acts in a dramatic production and who works in film, television, theatre, or radio in that capacity...

s and musician
Musician
A musician is an artist who plays a musical instrument. It may or may not be the person's profession. Musicians can be classified by their roles in performing music and writing music.Also....* A person who makes music a profession....

s; athletes from Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball is the highest level of professional baseball in the United States and Canada, consisting of teams that play in the National League and the American League...

, the National Football League
National Football League
The National Football League is the highest level of professional American football in the United States, and is considered the top professional American football league in the world. It was formed by eleven teams in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing...

, the National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
The National Basketball Association is the pre-eminent men's professional basketball league in North America. It consists of thirty franchised member clubs, of which twenty-nine are located in the United States and one in Canada...

, and the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
The Olympic Games is a major international event featuring summer and winter sports, in which thousands of athletes participate in a variety of competitions. The Olympic Games have come to be regarded as the world’s foremost sports competition where more than 200 nations participate...

; chief executive officer
Chief executive officer
A chief executive officer , managing director , Executive Director for non-profit organizations, or chief executive is the highest-ranking corporate officer or administrator in charge of total management of an organization...

s of various companies; former Mayors of Miami; and scientists.

Notable faculty

The University of Miami faculty includes (or has included), by way of example, physicists Paul Dirac
Paul Dirac
Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS was an English theoretical physicist who made fundamental contributions to the early development of both quantum mechanics and quantum electrodynamics...

 and Carolyne M. Van Vliet
Carolyne M. van Vliet
Carolyne Marina Van Vliet is a Dutch-born American physicist notable for the theory of generation-recombination noise and for the theory of quantum transport in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, as well as for her many contributions to the foundations of Linear Response Theory...

, geologist Cesare Emiliani
Cesare Emiliani
Cesare Emiliani was an Italian-American scientist, considered one of the greatest geologists and micropaleontologists of the 20th century and the founder of paleoceanography, developing the timescale of marine isotope stages, which despite modifications remains in very wide use today.He...

, marine biologist Samuel H. Gruber, economist Neil Wallace
Neil Wallace
Neil Wallace is an American economist and professor at Pennsylvania State University. Wallace is considered one of the main proponents of new classical macroeconomics....

, artist and architect Bonnie Seeman
Bonnie Seeman
Bonnie Seeman is an American ceramic artist born in 1969. She received a BFA in ceramics in 1991 from the University of Miami and an MFA in ceramics in 1996 from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She is a senior lecturer at the University of Miami. Her works are based on utilitarian...

, architect Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk
Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk
Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk is an American architect and urban planner of Polish aristocratic roots based in Miami, Florida...

, sociologist Lowell Juilliard Carr, constitutional law expert John Hart Ely
John Hart Ely
John Hart Ely is one of the most widely-cited legal scholars in United States history, ranking just after Richard Posner, Ronald Dworkin, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., according to a 2000 study in the University of Chicago's Journal of Legal Studies.-Biography:Born in New York City, John Hart...

, head of the Administrative Conference of the United States
Administrative Conference of the United States
The Administrative Conference of the United States is an independent agency of the United States government established by the Administrative Conference Act of 1964. It is also considered to be a federal advisory committee...

, legal expert Paul R. Verkuil
Paul R. Verkuil
Paul Robert Verkuil is an attorney, former dean of the Tulane University Law School, former president of the College of William and Mary, and former dean of Cardozo School of Law. He has also served as the CEO of the American Automobile Association from 1992 to 1995. He is currently on the...

, bassist Jaco Pastorius
Jaco Pastorius
John Francis Anthony Pastorius III , known as Jaco Pastorius, was an American jazz musician and composer widely acknowledged as a virtuoso electric bass player....

, and philosopher Colin McGinn
Colin McGinn
Colin McGinn is a British philosopher currently working at the University of Miami. McGinn has also held major teaching positions at Oxford University and Rutgers University. He is best known for his work in the philosophy of mind, though he has written on topics across the breadth of modern...

.

External links

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