Trenton, New Jersey
Overview
Trenton is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
A U.S. state is any one of the 50 federated states of the United States of America that share sovereignty with the federal government. Because of this shared sovereignty, an American is a citizen both of the federal entity and of his or her state of domicile. Four states use the official title of...

 of New Jersey
New Jersey
New Jersey is a state in the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic regions of the United States. , its population was 8,791,894. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York, on the southeast and south by the Atlantic Ocean, on the west by Pennsylvania and on the southwest by Delaware...

 and the county seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 of Mercer County
Mercer County, New Jersey
As of the census of 2000, there were 350,761 people, 125,807 households, and 86,303 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,552 people per square mile . There were 133,280 housing units at an average density of 590 per square mile...

. As of the 2010 United States Census, Trenton had a population of 84,913. The city is part of the Greater New York City Combined Statistical Area.
Trenton dates back at least to June 3, 1719, when mention was made of a constable being appointed for Trenton, while the area was still part of Hunterdon County
Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Hunterdon County is a county located in the western section of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 128,349. It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Flemington....

. Boundaries were recorded for Trenton Township as of March 2, 1720, a courthouse and jail were constructed in Trenton around 1720 and the Freeholders of Hunterdon County met annually in Trenton.
Encyclopedia
Trenton is the capital of the U.S. state
U.S. state
A U.S. state is any one of the 50 federated states of the United States of America that share sovereignty with the federal government. Because of this shared sovereignty, an American is a citizen both of the federal entity and of his or her state of domicile. Four states use the official title of...

 of New Jersey
New Jersey
New Jersey is a state in the Northeastern and Middle Atlantic regions of the United States. , its population was 8,791,894. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York, on the southeast and south by the Atlantic Ocean, on the west by Pennsylvania and on the southwest by Delaware...

 and the county seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 of Mercer County
Mercer County, New Jersey
As of the census of 2000, there were 350,761 people, 125,807 households, and 86,303 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,552 people per square mile . There were 133,280 housing units at an average density of 590 per square mile...

. As of the 2010 United States Census, Trenton had a population of 84,913. The city is part of the Greater New York City Combined Statistical Area.
Trenton dates back at least to June 3, 1719, when mention was made of a constable being appointed for Trenton, while the area was still part of Hunterdon County
Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Hunterdon County is a county located in the western section of the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 128,349. It is part of the New York Metropolitan Area. Its county seat is Flemington....

. Boundaries were recorded for Trenton Township as of March 2, 1720, a courthouse and jail were constructed in Trenton around 1720 and the Freeholders of Hunterdon County met annually in Trenton. Trenton became New Jersey's capital as of November 25, 1790, and the City of Trenton was formed within Trenton Township on November 13, 1792. Trenton Township was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature
New Jersey Legislature
The New Jersey Legislature is the legislative branch of the government of the U.S. state of New Jersey. In its current form, as defined by the New Jersey Constitution of 1947, the Legislature consists of two houses: the General Assembly and the Senate...

 on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken on February 22, 1834, to form Ewing Township
Ewing Township, New Jersey
-Demographics:As of the 2010 Census, there were 35,790 people, 13,171 households, and 7,980 families residing in the township. There were 13,926 housing units. The racial makeup of the township was 63.1% White, 27.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 2.2%...

.

A series of annexations took place over a 50-year period, with the city absorbing South Trenton borough
South Trenton
South Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey, United States, that is home to a diverse array of immigrants from places such as Italy, Latin America, and Ireland and their ancestors. It is Trenton's most diverse neighborhood and borders Hamilton Township to the Southeast and the Delaware...

 (April 14, 1851), portions of Nottingham Township
Nottingham Township, New Jersey
Nottingham Township existed almost 168 years in New Jersey from 1688 until it was dissolved in 1856.The Township was created on November 6, 1688, as a part of Burlington County in the Province of New Jersey. It was incorporated by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature as one of the State of New...

 (April 14, 1856), Chambersburg
Chambersburg, New Jersey
Chambersburg was a municipality that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1872 to 1888. Chambersburg is now a section of Trenton....

 and Millham Township
Millham Township, New Jersey
Millham was a township that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1882 to 1888.Millham was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 10, 1882 from portions of Lawrence Township. On March 30, 1888, the township was annexed by...

 (both on March 30, 1888) and Wilbur borough
Wilbur, New Jersey
Wilbur was a borough that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1891 to 1898.Wilbur was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 24, 1891 from portions of Hamilton Township, based on the results of a referendum held six days earlier. On February...

 (February 28, 1898).

History

The first settlement which would become Trenton was established by Quakers
Religious Society of Friends
The Religious Society of Friends, or Friends Church, is a Christian movement which stresses the doctrine of the priesthood of all believers. Members are known as Friends, or popularly as Quakers. It is made of independent organisations, which have split from one another due to doctrinal differences...

 in 1679, in the region then called the Falls of the Delaware, led by Mahlon Stacy from Handsworth
Handsworth, South Yorkshire
Handsworth is a suburb of south eastern Sheffield, in South Yorkshire, England. Handsworth has a population of approximately 15,000. It covers an overall area of approximately...

, Sheffield
Sheffield
Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough of South Yorkshire, England. Its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, and with some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely...

, UK. Quakers were being persecuted in England at this time and North America provided the perfect opportunity to exercise their religious freedom.

By 1719, the town adopted the name "Trent-towne", after William Trent, one of its leading landholders who purchased much of the surrounding land from Stacy's family. This name later was shortened to "Trenton".

During the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
The American Revolutionary War , the American War of Independence, or simply the Revolutionary War, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several European great powers.The war was the result of the...

, the city was the site of George Washington
George Washington
George Washington was the dominant military and political leader of the new United States of America from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of...

's first military victory. On December 26, 1776, Washington and his army, after crossing the icy Delaware River to Trenton, defeated the Hessian troops garrisoned there (see Battle of Trenton
Battle of Trenton
The Battle of Trenton took place on December 26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War, after General George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River north of Trenton, New Jersey. The hazardous crossing in adverse weather made it possible for Washington to lead the main body of the...

). After the war, Trenton was briefly the national capital of the United States in November and December of 1784. The city was considered as a permanent capital for the new country, but the southern states favored a location south of the Mason-Dixon Line
Mason-Dixon line
The Mason–Dixon Line was surveyed between 1763 and 1767 by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in the resolution of a border dispute between British colonies in Colonial America. It forms a demarcation line among four U.S. states, forming part of the borders of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and...

.

Trenton became the state capital in 1790, but prior to that year the Legislature often met here. The town was incorporated in 1792.

During the 1812 War, the primary hospital facility for the U.S. Army was at a temporary location on Broad Street.

Throughout the 19th Century, Trenton grew steadily, as Europeans came to work in its pottery and wire rope mills. In 1837, with the population now too large for government by council, a new mayoral government was adopted, with by-laws that remain in operation to this day.
Trenton has over 82,000 people.

Geography

Trenton is located at 40.221741°N 74.756138°W.

According to the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
The United States Census Bureau is the government agency that is responsible for the United States Census. It also gathers other national demographic and economic data...

, the city has a total area of 8.1 square miles (21 km²)—7.7 square miles (19.8 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.3 km²) of it is water
Water
Water is a chemical substance with the chemical formula H2O. A water molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms connected by covalent bonds. Water is a liquid at ambient conditions, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice, and gaseous state . Water also exists in a...

. The total area is 6.01% water.

Several bridges across the Delaware River — the Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge
Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge
The Trenton–Morrisville Toll Bridge is one of three road bridges connecting Trenton, New Jersey with Morrisville, Pennsylvania. Opened in 1952, it carries U.S. Route 1 and is owned and operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. This bridge's toll plaza was originally configured to...

, Lower Trenton Bridge
Lower Trenton Bridge
The Lower Trenton Toll Supported Bridge, commonly called the Lower Free Bridge, Warren Street Bridge or Trenton Makes Bridge, is a two-lane through truss bridge over the Delaware River between Trenton, New Jersey and Morrisville, Pennsylvania, owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission...

 and Calhoun Street Bridge – connect Trenton to Morrisville
Morrisville, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Morrisville is a borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 8,728 at the 2010 census.-Geography:Morrisville is located at . It is situated on the Delaware River directly across from Trenton, New Jersey...

, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is a U.S. state that is located in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The state borders Delaware and Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, New York and Ontario, Canada, to the north, and New Jersey to...

.
Several bridges cross the Delaware River — the Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge
Trenton-Morrisville Toll Bridge
The Trenton–Morrisville Toll Bridge is one of three road bridges connecting Trenton, New Jersey with Morrisville, Pennsylvania. Opened in 1952, it carries U.S. Route 1 and is owned and operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. This bridge's toll plaza was originally configured to...

, Lower Trenton Bridge
Lower Trenton Bridge
The Lower Trenton Toll Supported Bridge, commonly called the Lower Free Bridge, Warren Street Bridge or Trenton Makes Bridge, is a two-lane through truss bridge over the Delaware River between Trenton, New Jersey and Morrisville, Pennsylvania, owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission...

 and Calhoun Street Bridge – all of which connect Trenton to Morrisville, PA.

Trenton is located in almost the exact geographic center of the state (the official geographic center is 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Trenton). Due to this, it is sometimes included as part of North Jersey
North Jersey
North Jersey is a colloquial term, with no precise consensus definition, for the northern portion of the U.S. state of New Jersey. A straightforward, noncolloquial term for the region is northern New Jersey.- Two-portion approaches :...

 and as the southernmost city of the Tri-State Region. Others consider it a part of South Jersey
South Jersey
South Jersey comprises the southern portions of the U.S. state of New Jersey between the lower Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean. The designation is a colloquial one, reflecting not only geographical but perceived cultural differences from the northern part of the state, with no official...

 and thus, the northernmost city of the Delaware Valley
Delaware Valley
The Delaware Valley is a term used to refer to the valley where the Delaware River flows, along with the surrounding communities. This includes the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia. Such educational institutions as Delaware Valley Regional High School in Alexandria Township...

. Following the 2000 United States Census, Trenton was shifted from the Philadelphia metropolitan area to the New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
The New York metropolitan area, also known as Greater New York, or the Tri-State area, is the region that composes of New York City and the surrounding region...

, with a similar shift by the New Haven, Connecticut
New Haven, Connecticut
New Haven is the second-largest city in Connecticut and the sixth-largest in New England. According to the 2010 Census, New Haven's population increased by 5.0% between 2000 and 2010, a rate higher than that of the State of Connecticut, and higher than that of the state's five largest cities, and...

 area to the New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
The New York metropolitan area, also known as Greater New York, or the Tri-State area, is the region that composes of New York City and the surrounding region...

 they became the first ever cases where a region is in a different metropolitan area than TV/media/Nielsen market. However, Mercer County
Mercer County, New Jersey
As of the census of 2000, there were 350,761 people, 125,807 households, and 86,303 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,552 people per square mile . There were 133,280 housing units at an average density of 590 per square mile...

 constitutes its own metropolitan statistical area, formally known as the Trenton-Ewing MSA. Locals consider Trenton to be a part of ambiguous Central Jersey
Central Jersey
Central Jersey is a common designation for a region of the state of New Jersey in the United States of America. Trenton is considered the boundary between designated "North Jersey" and "South Jersey"...

, and thus part of neither region. These same locals are generally split as to whether they are within New York or Philadelphia's sphere of influence (geographically it is closer to Philadelphia than New York and it is part of Philadelphia's TV/media market, however many people who have recently moved to the area commute to New York and have moved there to escape the New York region's high housing costs).

Trenton is one of two state capitals that border another state – the other being Carson City, Nevada
Carson City, Nevada
The Consolidated Municipality of Carson City is the capital of the state of Nevada. The words Consolidated Municipality refer to a series of changes in 1969 which abolished Ormsby County and merged all the settlements contained within its borders into Carson City. Since that time Carson City has...

.

Climate

According to the Koppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Crimea German climatologist Wladimir Köppen in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen himself, notably in 1918 and 1936...

, Trenton enjoys a humid continental climate
Humid continental climate
A humid continental climate is a climatic region typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot summers and cold winters....

 temperate
Temperate
In geography, temperate or tepid latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. The changes in these regions between summer and winter are generally relatively moderate, rather than extreme hot or cold...

 climate with some marine influence due to the nearby Atlantic Ocean. The four seasons are of approximately equal length, with precipitation
Precipitation (meteorology)
In meteorology, precipitation In meteorology, precipitation In meteorology, precipitation (also known as one of the classes of hydrometeors, which are atmospheric water phenomena is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity. The main forms of precipitation...

 fairly evenly distributed through the year. The temperature is rarely below zero or above 100 °F
Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit is the temperature scale proposed in 1724 by, and named after, the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit . Within this scale, the freezing of water into ice is defined at 32 degrees, while the boiling point of water is defined to be 212 degrees...

.

During the winter months, temperatures routinely fall below freezing, but rarely fall below 0 °F (-17.8 °C). The coldest temperature ever recorded in Trenton was −14 °F (−25.6 °C
Celsius
Celsius is a scale and unit of measurement for temperature. It is named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius , who developed a similar temperature scale two years before his death...

) on February 9, 1934. The average January low is 24 °F (−4.4 °C) and the average January high is 38 °F (3.3 °C). The summers are usually very warm, with temperatures often reaching into the 90 °F's, but rarely reaching into the 100 °F's. The average July low is 67 °F (19.4 °C) and the average July high is 85 °F (29.4 °C). The temperature reaches or exceeds 90 °F (32.2 °C) on 18 days each year, on average. The hottest temperature ever recorded in Trenton was 106 °F (41.1 °C) on July 9, 1936, and again on July 22, 2011. The hottest year on record was 2010 with an average temperature of 56.2 °F (13.4 °C).

The average precipitation is 45.77 inches (1,162.6 mm) per year, which is fairly evenly distributed through the year. The driest month on average is February, with only 2.87 inches (72.9 mm) of rainfall on average, while the wettest month is July, with 4.82 inches (122.4 mm) of rainfall on average. Rainfall extremes can occur, however. The all-time single-day rainfall record is 7.25 inches (184.2 mm) on September 16, 1999, during the passage of Hurricane Floyd
Hurricane Floyd
Hurricane Floyd was the sixth named storm, fourth hurricane, and third major hurricane in the 1999 Atlantic hurricane season. Floyd triggered the third largest evacuation in US history when 2.6 million coastal residents of five states were ordered from their homes as it approached...

. The all-time monthly rainfall record is 14.55 inches (369.6 mm) in August 1955, due to the passage of Hurricane Connie
Hurricane Connie
Hurricane Connie was the first in a series of hurricanes to strike North Carolina during the 1955 Atlantic hurricane season. Connie struck as a Category 1, causing major flooding and inflicting extensive damage to the Outer Banks and inland to Raleigh....

 and Hurricane Diane
Hurricane Diane
Hurricane Diane was one of three hurricanes to hit North Carolina during the 1955 Atlantic hurricane season, striking an area that had been hit by Hurricane Connie five days earlier...

. The wettest year on record was 1996, when 67.9 inches (1,724.7 mm) of rain fell. On the flip side, the driest month on record was October 1963, when only 0.05 inches (1.3 mm) of rain was recorded. The driest year on record was 1957, when only 28.79 inches (731.3 mm) of rain was recorded.

Snowfall can vary even more year-to-year. The average snowfall is 23.4 inches (594.4 mm), but has ranged from as low as 2 inches (in the winter of 1918–19) to as high as 76.9 inches (1,953.3 mm) (in 1995–96). The heaviest snowstorm on record was the Blizzard of 1996
North American blizzard of 1996
The Blizzard of 1996 was a severe nor'easter that paralyzed the U.S. East Coast with up to of wind-driven snow from January 6 to January 8, 1996. It was followed by another storm on January 12th, then unusually warm weather and torrential rain which caused rapid melting and river...

 on January 7–8, 1996, when 24.2 inches (614.7 mm) of snow fell.

Demographics

As of the census
Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common...

of 2010, there were 84,913, people, 29,437 households, and 18,692 families residing in the city. The population density
Population density
Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and particularly to humans...

 was 11,153.6 people per square mile (4,304.7/km²). There were 33,843 housing units at an average density of 4,419.9 per square mile (1,705.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 52.0% Black, 13.5% White, 0.17% Native American, 1.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 10.76% from other races
Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the Federal Office of Management and Budget and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are...

, and 3.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 33.7% of the population.

There were 29,437 households, 32.4% of which had children under the age of 18 living with them. 29.0% were married couples
Marriage
Marriage is a social union or legal contract between people that creates kinship. It is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually intimate and sexual, are acknowledged in a variety of ways, depending on the culture or subculture in which it is found...

 living together, 27.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.38.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.

The median income for a household
Median household income
The median household income is commonly used to generate data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more...

 in the city was $31,074, and the median income for a family was $36,681. Males had a median income of $29,721 versus $26,943 for females. The per capita income
Per capita income
Per capita income or income per person is a measure of mean income within an economic aggregate, such as a country or city. It is calculated by taking a measure of all sources of income in the aggregate and dividing it by the total population...

 for the city was $14,621. About 17.6% of families and 21.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.8% of those under age 18 and 19.5% of those age 65 or over.

Top 10 ethnicities reported during the 2000 Census by percentage:
  1. African American
    African American
    African Americans are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa and are the direct descendants of enslaved Africans within the boundaries of the present United States...

     (50.1)
  2. Puerto Rican
    Puerto Rican people
    A Puerto Rican is a person who was born in Puerto Rico.Puerto Ricans born and raised in the continental United States are also sometimes referred to as Puerto Ricans, although they were not born in Puerto Rico...

     (14.5)
  3. Italian
    Italian American
    An Italian American , is an American of Italian ancestry. The designation may also refer to someone possessing Italian and American dual citizenship...

     (4.6)
  4. Irish
    Irish American
    Irish Americans are citizens of the United States who can trace their ancestry to Ireland. A total of 36,278,332 Americans—estimated at 11.9% of the total population—reported Irish ancestry in the 2008 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau...

     (3.5)
  5. Polish
    Polish American
    A Polish American , is a citizen of the United States of Polish descent. There are an estimated 10 million Polish Americans, representing about 3.2% of the population of the United States...

     (3.0)
  6. Guatemala
    Guatemala
    Guatemala is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, Belize to the northeast, the Caribbean to the east, and Honduras and El Salvador to the southeast...

     (2.8)
  7. English
    English American
    English Americans are citizens or residents of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England....

     (1.9)
  8. Jamaican
    Jamaican American
    Jamaican Americans are Americans of Jamaican heritage or Jamaican-born people who live in the United States of America. American citizenship is not a prerequisite of being a Jamaican American as permanent residents are also given this title....

     (1.5)
  9. Hungarian
    Hungarian American
    Hungarian Americans Hungarian are American citizens of Hungarian descent. The constant influx of Hungarian immigrants was marked by several waves of sharp increase.-History:...

     (1.0)
  10. Mexican
    Mexican American
    Mexican Americans are Americans of Mexican descent. As of July 2009, Mexican Americans make up 10.3% of the United States' population with over 31,689,000 Americans listed as of Mexican ancestry. Mexican Americans comprise 66% of all Hispanics and Latinos in the United States...

     (1.0)


Economy

Trenton was a major manufacturing center in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. One relic of that era is the slogan "Trenton Makes, The World Takes", which is displayed on the Lower Free Bridge (just north of the Trenton–Morrisville Toll Bridge). The city adopted the slogan in 1917 to represent Trenton's then-leading role as a major manufacturing center for rubber, wire rope, ceramics and cigars.

Along with many other United States cities in the 1960s and 1970s, Trenton fell on hard times when manufacturing and industrial jobs declined. Concurrently, state government agencies began leasing office space in the surrounding suburbs. State government leaders (particularly governors William Cahill and Brendan Byrne
Brendan Byrne
Brendan Thomas Byrne is an American Democratic Party politician from New Jersey, who served as the 47th Governor of New Jersey, from 1974 to 1982.-Early life and education:...

) attempted to revitalize the downtown area by making it the center of state government. Between 1982 and 1992, more than a dozen office buildings were constructed primarily by the state to house state offices. Today, Trenton's biggest employer is still the state of New Jersey. Each weekday, 20,000 state workers flood into the city from the surrounding suburbs.

In the early 1970s, then Mayor Art Holland spearheaded an effort to close State Street between Montgomery and Warren Street (the center of the downtown business district). The intention was to lure big department stores, such as J.C. Penney and Montgomery Ward to the downtown area to anchor an urban shopping district. The pedestrian mall, named the Trenton Commons, was officially opened in September 1973. By all accounts, the experiment flopped. The Commons did nothing to lure new businesses to the downtown area or stem the flow of longtime downtown merchants' (most notably Sears and Dunham’s) exodus to the suburbs. Additionally, the Commons created a complicated downtown traffic pattern which made navigating the surrounding area a nightmare. Furthermore, the plan failed to address the lack of parking and crime and safety issues. Lastly, the poor design of the mall, which consisted of harsh metal pipes covered by glasslike canopies and accented by concrete bollards contrasted with Trenton’s historic architecture. In 2004, the Trenton Commons experiment finally ended, as vehicular access was fully restored to State Street between Montgomery and Warren Street. The closure of State Street by Mayor Holland, coupled with his tacit approval of the demolition of the Capitol and Lincoln Theaters (both former historical opera houses) in favor of parking lots, effectively prevented any future development of Trenton as a center of culture. Ironically, Mayor Holland worked for the preservation of an insignificant brick warehouse near the former Sears building for use as an art center. Other failed projects under the Holland administration included his attempted purchase and relocation of an arena located in Cherry Hill to replace the Trenton Civic Center (formerly the Trenton Armory) which had been destroyed by fire.

Urban Enterprise Zone

Portions of Trenton are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone
Urban Enterprise Zone
In the United States, Urban Enterprise Zones , also known as Enterprise Zones, are intended to encourage development in blighted neighborhoods through tax and regulatory relief to entrepreneurs and investors who launch businesses in the area. UEZs are areas where companies can locate free of...

. In addition to other benefits to encourage employment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3½% sales tax
Sales tax
A sales tax is a tax, usually paid by the consumer at the point of purchase, itemized separately from the base price, for certain goods and services. The tax amount is usually calculated by applying a percentage rate to the taxable price of a sale....

 rate (versus the 7% rate charged statewide).

Neighborhoods

The city of Trenton is home to numerous neighborhood
Neighbourhood
A neighbourhood or neighborhood is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town or suburb. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members. "Researchers have not agreed on an exact definition...

s and sub-neighborhoods. The main neighborhoods are taken from the four cardinal direction
Cardinal direction
The four cardinal directions or cardinal points are the directions of north, east, south, and west, commonly denoted by their initials: N, E, S, W. East and west are at right angles to north and south, with east being in the direction of rotation and west being directly opposite. Intermediate...

s (North, South, East, and West). Trenton was once home to large Italian, Hungarian, and Jewish communities, but since the 1960s demographic shifts have changed the city into a relatively segregated urban enclave of middle and lower class African Americans. Italians are scattered throughout the city, but a distinct Italian community is centered in the Chambersburg
Chambersburg, New Jersey
Chambersburg was a municipality that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1872 to 1888. Chambersburg is now a section of Trenton....

 neighborhood, in South Trenton. This community has been in decline since the 1970s, largely due to economic and social shifts to the more prosperous, less crime-ridden suburbs surrounding the city. Today Chambersburg has a large Latino community. Many of the Latino immigrants are from Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua. There is also a significant and growing Asian community in the Chambersburg neighborhood primarily made up of Burmese and Bhutanese/Nepali refugees.

The North Ward
North Trenton
North Trenton is a ward within Trenton, the capital of the U.S. state of New Jersey and the county seat of Mercer County. As of 2005, the City of Trenton had a population of approximately 80,000.-The Origin of North Trenton:...

, once a mecca for the city's middle class, is now one of the most economically distressed, torn apart by race riots following the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968. Nonetheless, the area still retains many important architectural and historic sites. North Trenton still has a large Polish-American neighborhood that borders Lawrence Township, many of whom attend St Hedwigs Roman Catholic Church on Brunswick Ave. St. Hedwigs church was built in 1904 by Polish immigrants, many of whose families still attend the church. North Trenton is also home to the historic Shiloh Baptist Church—one of the largest houses of worship in Trenton and the oldest African American church in the city founded in 1888. The church is currently pastored by Rev. Darrell L. Armstrong who carried the Olympic torch in 2002 for the Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. Also located just at the southern tip of North Trenton is the city's Battle Monument, also known as "Five Points". It is a 150 ft (45.7 m) structure that marks the spot where George Washington
George Washington
George Washington was the dominant military and political leader of the new United States of America from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of...

's Continental Army
Continental Army
The Continental Army was formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. Established by a resolution of the Continental Congress on June 14, 1775, it was created to coordinate the military efforts of the Thirteen Colonies in...

 launched the Battle of Trenton
Battle of Trenton
The Battle of Trenton took place on December 26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War, after General George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River north of Trenton, New Jersey. The hazardous crossing in adverse weather made it possible for Washington to lead the main body of the...

 during the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
The American Revolutionary War , the American War of Independence, or simply the Revolutionary War, began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen British colonies in North America, and ended in a global war between several European great powers.The war was the result of the...

. It faces downtown Trenton and is a symbol of the city's historic past.

South Ward
South Trenton
South Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey, United States, that is home to a diverse array of immigrants from places such as Italy, Latin America, and Ireland and their ancestors. It is Trenton's most diverse neighborhood and borders Hamilton Township to the Southeast and the Delaware...

 is the most diverse neighborhood in Trenton and is home to many Latin America
Latin America
Latin America is a region of the Americas where Romance languages  – particularly Spanish and Portuguese, and variably French – are primarily spoken. Latin America has an area of approximately 21,069,500 km² , almost 3.9% of the Earth's surface or 14.1% of its land surface area...

n, Italian-American, and African American residents.

East Ward
East Trenton
East Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey. It borders Hamilton Township and is home to a sizable Black community, in addition to having small pockets of Latinos and Italians....

 is the smallest neighborhood in Trenton and is home to the Trenton Train Station
Trenton Rail Station (New Jersey)
Trenton Transit Center, formerly known as Trenton Rail Station, is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. It is the southernmost stop in New Jersey on the Northeast Corridor...

 as well as Trenton Central High School
Trenton Central High School
Trenton Central High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the Trenton Public Schools....

. Recently, two campuses have been added, Trenton Central High School West and Trenton Central High School North, respectively, in those areas of the city. The Chambersburg neighborhood is within the East Ward, and was once noted in the region as a destination for its many Italian
Italian cuisine
Italian cuisine has developed through centuries of social and political changes, with roots as far back as the 4th century BCE. Italian cuisine in itself takes heavy influences, including Etruscan, ancient Greek, ancient Roman, Byzantine, Jewish and Arab cuisines...

 restaurants and pizzerias. With changing demographics, many of these businesses have either closed or relocated to suburban locations.

West Ward is the home of Trenton's more suburban neighborhoods.

Neighborhoods

  • Downtown/Central Trenton
    • Central West
    • Fisher-Richey-Perdicaris
      Ion Perdicaris
      Ion Hanford Perdicaris was a Greek-American playboy who was the centre of a notable kidnapping known as the Perdicaris incident, which aroused international conflict in 1904.-Family life:...

    • Hanover Academy
    • Mill Hill
    • North 25
  • East Trenton
    East Trenton
    East Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey. It borders Hamilton Township and is home to a sizable Black community, in addition to having small pockets of Latinos and Italians....

    • Chambersburg
      Chambersburg, New Jersey
      Chambersburg was a municipality that existed in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, from 1872 to 1888. Chambersburg is now a section of Trenton....

    • Ewing and Carroll
    • Greenwood and Hamilton
    • Villa Park
    • Wilbur
  • West Trenton
    • Berkeley Square
    • Cadwalader Heights and Hillcrest
    • Glen Afton
    • Glendale
    • Hiltonia
    • Parkside
    • Pennington/Prospect
    • Prospect Park
    • Stuyvesant/Prospect
    • The Island
    • Weber Park
    • West End
  • South Trenton
    South Trenton
    South Trenton is a neighborhood in Trenton, New Jersey, United States, that is home to a diverse array of immigrants from places such as Italy, Latin America, and Ireland and their ancestors. It is Trenton's most diverse neighborhood and borders Hamilton Township to the Southeast and the Delaware...

    • Chestnut Park
  • North Trenton
    North Trenton
    North Trenton is a ward within Trenton, the capital of the U.S. state of New Jersey and the county seat of Mercer County. As of 2005, the City of Trenton had a population of approximately 80,000.-The Origin of North Trenton:...

    • Battle Monument(Five Points)
    • Top Road


Local government

The City of Trenton is governed under the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
The Faulkner Act, or Optional Municipal Charter Law, provides for New Jersey municipalities to adopt a Mayor-Council government.This form of government provides for election of a mayor and five, seven, or nine council members...

 system of municipal government.

, the Mayor of Trenton, New Jersey
Mayor of Trenton, New Jersey
Mayor of Trenton, New Jersey:*Tony F. Mack 2010 to present.*Douglas Harold Palmer 1990 to 2010. Douglas Harold Palmer was the first African American mayor of Trenton, New Jersey.*Arthur John Holland 1970 to circa 1990....

 is Tony F. Mack
Tony F. Mack
Tony F. Mack, Sr. is the Mayor of Trenton, New Jersey. He faces a recall election in November 2011.-Biography:He was born on January 8, 1966, and attended the Trenton Public Schools. He earned a Bachelor’s Degree from Howard University in Washington, D.C. and earned his Master's Degree at...

, who took office on July 1, 2010. Mack won the election after former mayor Douglas H. Palmer decided not to seek reelection to a sixth term in office after serving for 20 years.

Mack faces a recall election after a controversial first year in office: Mack's critics say he has used the city's payroll like a personal piggy bank, hiring unqualified friends for key posts and focusing on minor projects like parks and parades as the city struggles with serious problems," according to the Times (Trenton). He blew through a string of business administrators. The first resigned after a month, saying the mayor didn't believe in "good government." Another resigned just ahead of pleading guilty to embezzlement on another job.

His housing director quit after it was learned he had a theft conviction. His chief of staff was arrested trying to buy heroin. His half-brother, whose authority he elevated at the city water plant, was arrested on charges of stealing. Most recently, his law director resigned after arguing with Mack over complying with open-records laws and potential violations of laws prohibiting city contracts to big campaign donors.

Members of the City Council are Council President George Muschal (South Ward), Council Vice President Phyllis Holly-Ward (At-Large), Alex Bethea (At-Large), Zachary Chester (West Ward), Marge Caldwell-Wilson (North Ward), Kathy McBride (At-Large) and Verlina Reynolds-Jackson (East Ward).

Federal, state and county representation

Trenton is split between the 4th Congressional district and the 12th Congressional district and is part of New Jersey's 15th state legislative district. The legislative district was kept unchanged by the New Jersey Apportionment Commission
New Jersey Apportionment Commission
The New Jersey Apportionment Commission is a constitutionally-created ten-member commission responsible for apportioning the forty districts of the New Jersey Legislature. The commission is convened after each decennial U.S. Census, and the districts are to be in use for the legislative elections...

 based on the results of the 2010 Census.




Colleges and universities

Trenton is the home of two post-secondary institutions, Thomas Edison State College
Thomas Edison State College
Thomas Edison State College is a public institution of higher education located in Trenton, New Jersey. One of New Jersey's 12 public universities and colleges, Thomas Edison State College offers degrees at the undergraduate and graduate level....

 and Mercer County Community College
Mercer County Community College
Mercer County Community College is an accredited, co-educational, two-year, public, community college located in Mercer County, New Jersey. The school's current president is Dr. Patricia C. Donohue...

's James Kearney Campus. The College of New Jersey
The College of New Jersey
The College of New Jersey, abbreviated TCNJ, is a public, coeducational university located in Ewing Township, New Jersey, a suburb of Trenton....

, formerly named Trenton State College, was founded in Trenton in 1855 and is now located in nearby Ewing Township
Ewing Township, New Jersey
-Demographics:As of the 2010 Census, there were 35,790 people, 13,171 households, and 7,980 families residing in the township. There were 13,926 housing units. The racial makeup of the township was 63.1% White, 27.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 2.2%...

. Rider University
Rider University
Rider University is a private, coeducational and nonsectarian university located chiefly in Lawrenceville, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States...

 was founded in Trenton in 1865 as The Trenton Business College. In 1964, Rider moved to its current location in nearby Lawrence Township
Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Area residents often refer to all of Lawrence Township as Lawrenceville. Lawrenceville is a census-designated place and unincorporated area located within Lawrence Township...

.

Public schools

The Trenton Public Schools
Trenton Public Schools
The Trenton Public Schools are a comprehensive community public school district, serving students in kindergarten through twelfth grade from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. The district has twenty-one elementary schools, two middle schools and five high school programs...

 serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district is one of 31 Abbott District
Abbott District
Abbott districts are school districts in New Jersey that are provided remedies to ensure that their students receive public education in accordance with New Jersey’s state constitution. They were created in 1985 as a result of the first ruling of Abbott v. Burke, a case filed by the Education Law...

s statewide. The Superintendent runs the district and the school board is appointed by the Mayor. The school district has undergone a 'construction' renaissance throughout the district. Trenton Central High School
Trenton Central High School
Trenton Central High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school that serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from Trenton, in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, as part of the Trenton Public Schools....

 is Trenton's only traditional public high school.

Charter schools

Trenton is home to several charter school
Charter school
Charter schools are primary or secondary schools that receive public money but are not subject to some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each school's charter...

s, Capital Preparatory Charter High School, Emily Fisher Charter School, Foundation Academy Charter School
Foundation Academy Charter School
Foundation Academy Charter School is a charter school located in Trenton, New Jersey. The mission of the school as stated on its website is "to ensure that all of our students secure the academic knowledge and skills to prepare them for the nation's finest high schools and colleges, and to instill...

, International Charter School, Paul Robeson Charter School, and Village Charter School.

Other schools

Trenton Community Music School is a not-for-profit community school of the arts. The school was founded by executive director Marcia Wood in 1997. The school currently operates in two locations: Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church
Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church
Blessed Sacrament Church or Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church may refer to:in Canada*Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in the United States*Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, Hollywood*Blessed Sacrament Church...

(on Tuesdays) and the Copeland Center for the Performing Arts (on Saturdays).

Crime

In 2005, there were 31 homicides in Trenton, the largest number in a single year in the city's history, with 22 of the homicides believed to be gang related. The city was named the 4th "Most Dangerous" in 2005 out of 129 cities with a population of 75,000 to 99,999 ranked nationwide. In the 2006 survey, Trenton was ranked as the 14th most dangerous "city" overall out of 371 cities included nationwide in the 13th annual Morgan Quitno
Morgan Quitno
Morgan Quitno Press is a research and publishing company based in Lawrence, Kansas, which compiles books with statistics of crime rates, health care, education, and other categories, ranking cities and states in the United States...

 survey, and was again named as the fourth most dangerous "city" of 126 cities in the 75,000–99,999 population range. Homicides went down in 2006 to 20, but back up to 25 in 2007. In September of 2011, the city was forced to fire 108 police officers due to budget cuts; this constituted almost one-third of the Trenton Police Department.

Riots of 1968

The Trenton Riots of 1968 were a major civil disturbance that took place during the week following the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King in Memphis
Memphis, Tennessee
Memphis is a city in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Shelby County. The city is located on the 4th Chickasaw Bluff, south of the confluence of the Wolf and Mississippi rivers....

 on April 4. Race riot
Race riot
A race riot or racial riot is an outbreak of violent civil disorder in which race is a key factor. A phenomenon frequently confused with the concept of 'race riot' is sectarian violence, which involves public mass violence or conflict over non-racial factors.-United States:The term had entered the...

s broke out nationwide following the murder of the civil rights activist.

More than 200 Trenton businesses mostly in Downtown, were ransacked and burned.

More than 300 people, most of them young black men, were arrested on charges ranging from assault and arson to looting and violating the mayor's emergency curfew. In addition to 16 injured policemen, 15 firefighters were treated at city hospitals for smoke inhalation, burns, sprains and cuts suffered while fighting raging blazes or for injuries inflicted by rioters. Denizens of Trenton's urban core often pulled false alarms and would then throw bricks at firefighters responding to the alarm boxes. This experience, along with similar experiences in other major cities, effectively ended the use of open-cab fire engines. As an interim measure, the Trenton Fire Department fabricated temporary cab enclosures from steel deck plating until new equipment could be obtained. The losses incurred by downtown businesses were estimated at $17 million.

Trenton's Battle Monument
Trenton Battle Monument
The Trenton Battle Monument is a column-type monument in Trenton, New Jersey. It commemorates the December 26, 1776 Battle of Trenton, a pivotal victory for the Continental forces during the American Revolutionary War.-Description:...

 neighborhood was hardest hit. Since the 1950s, North Trenton had witnessed a steady exodus of middle-class residents, and the riots spelled the end for North Trenton. By the 1970s, the region had become one of the most blighted and crime-ridden in the city, although gentrification
Gentrification
Gentrification and urban gentrification refer to the changes that result when wealthier people acquire or rent property in low income and working class communities. Urban gentrification is associated with movement. Consequent to gentrification, the average income increases and average family size...

 in the area is revitalizing certain sections.

New Jersey State Prison

The New Jersey State Prison
New Jersey State Prison
The New Jersey State Prison , formerly known as Trenton State Prison, is a state prison in Trenton, New Jersey operated by the New Jersey Department of Corrections. It accommodated over 1,900 prisoners as of January, 2005....

 (formerly Trenton State Prison), which has two maximum security units, is located in Trenton. The prison houses some of the state's most dangerous individuals, which included New Jersey's Death Row population until the state banned capital punishment in 2007.

The following is inscribed over the original entrance to the prison.

Labor, Silence, Penitence.

The Penitentiary House,

Erected By Legislative

Authority.

Richard Howell, Governor.

In The XXII Year Of

American Independence

MDCCXCVII

That Those Who Are Feared

For Their Crimes

May Learn To Fear The Laws

And Be Useful

Hic Labor, Hic Opus.

Transportation

City highways include the Trenton Freeway, which is part of U.S. Route 1
U.S. Route 1 in New Jersey
U.S. Route 1 is a United States highway which parallels the East Coast of the United States, running from Key West, Florida in the south to Fort Kent, Maine at the Canadian border in the north. Of the entire length of the route, of it runs through New Jersey...

, and the John Fitch Parkway, which is part of Route 29. Canal Boulevard, more commonly known as Route 129, connects US Route 1 and NJ Route 29 in South Trenton. U.S. Route 206
U.S. Route 206
U.S. Route 206 is a long north–south United States highway in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, United States. Only about a half a mile of its length is in Pennsylvania; the Milford-Montague Toll Bridge carries it over the Delaware River into New Jersey, where it is the remainder of the route...

, Route 31, and Route 33 also pass through the city via regular city streets (Broad Street/Brunswick Avenue/Princeton Avenue, Pennington Avenue, and Greenwood Avenue, respectively).

Routes 29 and 129 connect the city to Interstate 195
Interstate 195 (New Jersey)
Interstate 195 is an auxiliary route of the Interstate Highway System located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Its western end is at I-295 and Route 29 just south of Trenton, New Jersey in Hamilton Township, Mercer County while its eastern end is at the Garden State Parkway, Route 34 and Route...

 which provides connections with Interstate 295
Interstate 295 (Delaware-New Jersey)
Interstate 295 in New Jersey and Delaware is an auxiliary Interstate Highway, designated as a bypass around Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The route begins at a junction with Interstate 95 south of Wilmington, Delaware, and runs to another junction with I-95 north of Trenton, New Jersey...

 and the New Jersey Turnpike
New Jersey Turnpike
The New Jersey Turnpike is a toll road in New Jersey, maintained by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. According to the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association, the Turnpike is the nation's sixth-busiest toll road and is among one of the most heavily traveled highways in the United...

 (also known as Interstate 95
Interstate 95 in New Jersey
Interstate 95 is a major Interstate Highway that traverses the full extent of the East Coast of the United States, from Florida to Maine...

).

Public transportation within the city and to/from its nearby suburbs is provided in the form of local bus routes run by New Jersey Transit
New Jersey Transit
The New Jersey Transit Corporation is a statewide public transportation system serving the United States state of New Jersey, and New York, Orange, and Rockland counties in New York State...

. SEPTA
Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority
The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority is a metropolitan transportation authority that operates various forms of public transit—bus, subway and elevated rail, commuter rail, light rail, and electric trolley bus—that serve 3.9 million people in and around Philadelphia,...

 also provides bus service to adjacent Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Bucks County, Pennsylvania
- Industry and commerce :The boroughs of Bristol and Morrisville were prominent industrial centers along the Northeast Corridor during World War II. Suburban development accelerated in Lower Bucks in the 1950s with the opening of Levittown, Pennsylvania, the second such "Levittown" designed by...

.

The Trenton Train Station
Trenton Rail Station (New Jersey)
Trenton Transit Center, formerly known as Trenton Rail Station, is the main passenger train station in Trenton, New Jersey. It is the southernmost stop in New Jersey on the Northeast Corridor...

, located on the heavily traveled Northeast Corridor
Northeast Corridor
The Northeast Corridor is a fully electrified railway line owned primarily by Amtrak serving the Northeast megalopolis of the United States from Boston in the north, via New York to Washington, D.C. in the south, with branches serving other cities...

, serves as the northbound terminus for SEPTA's Trenton Line (local train service to Philadelphia) and southbound terminus for New Jersey Transit
New Jersey Transit
The New Jersey Transit Corporation is a statewide public transportation system serving the United States state of New Jersey, and New York, Orange, and Rockland counties in New York State...

's Northeast Corridor Line
Northeast Corridor Line
The Northeast Corridor Line is a commuter rail operation run by New Jersey Transit along Amtrak's Northeast Corridor. It is the successor to commuter services provided by the Pennsylvania Railroad along the section between Trenton, New Jersey and New York Penn Station...

 (local train service to New York). The train station also serves as the northbound terminus for the River Line
River Line (New Jersey Transit)
The River Line is a diesel light rail system in New Jersey, United States, that connects the cities of Camden and Trenton, New Jersey's capital. It is operated for New Jersey Transit by the Southern New Jersey Rail Group , which originally included Bechtel Group and Bombardier...

; a diesel light rail
Light rail
Light rail or light rail transit is a form of urban rail public transportation that generally has a lower capacity and lower speed than heavy rail and metro systems, but higher capacity and higher speed than traditional street-running tram systems...

 line that runs to Camden
Camden, New Jersey
The city of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey. It is located across the Delaware River from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a total population of 77,344...

. Two additional River Line stops, Cass Street
Cass Street (River LINE station)
Cass Street is a station on the River Line light rail system, located on Cass Street at Route 129 in Trenton, New Jersey. Mercer County Waterfront Park is located five blocks away down Cass Street, while both the Hamilton Avenue stop and Sun National Bank Center are located a few blocks north on...

 and Hamilton Avenue
Hamilton Avenue (River LINE station)
Hamilton Avenue is a station on the River Line light rail system, located on Hamilton Avenue in Trenton, New Jersey.The station opened on March 15, 2004. Southbound service from the station is available to Camden, New Jersey...

, are located within the city.

Long-distance transportation is provided by Amtrak
Amtrak
The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak , is a government-owned corporation that was organized on May 1, 1971, to provide intercity passenger train service in the United States. "Amtrak" is a portmanteau of the words "America" and "track". It is headquartered at Union...

 train service along the Northeast Corridor
Northeast Corridor
The Northeast Corridor is a fully electrified railway line owned primarily by Amtrak serving the Northeast megalopolis of the United States from Boston in the north, via New York to Washington, D.C. in the south, with branches serving other cities...

. Limited commercial airline
Airline
An airline provides air transport services for traveling passengers and freight. Airlines lease or own their aircraft with which to supply these services and may form partnerships or alliances with other airlines for mutual benefit...

 transportation is provided at nearby Trenton-Mercer Airport
Trenton-Mercer Airport
Trenton-Mercer Airport , formerly known as Mercer County Airport, is a public airport located in Ewing, New Jersey, four miles northwest of the central business district of Trenton, a city in Mercer County, New Jersey...

 in Ewing
Ewing Township, New Jersey
-Demographics:As of the 2010 Census, there were 35,790 people, 13,171 households, and 7,980 families residing in the township. There were 13,926 housing units. The racial makeup of the township was 63.1% White, 27.6% African American, 0.3% Native American, 4.3% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 2.2%...

. Much more extensive airline service is available at the more distant international airports in Newark
Newark Liberty International Airport
Newark Liberty International Airport , first named Newark Metropolitan Airport and later Newark International Airport, is an international airport within the city limits of both Newark and Elizabeth, New Jersey, United States...

 (reachable by direct New Jersey Transit or Amtrak rail link) and Philadelphia
Philadelphia International Airport
Philadelphia International Airport is a major airport in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, and is the largest airport in the Delaware Valley region and in Pennsylvania...

.

Media

Trenton is served by two daily newspapers: The Times
The Times (Trenton)
The Times is a daily newspaper owned by Advance Publications that serves the Mercer County, New Jersey area, with a strong focus on the government of New Jersey. The paper had a daily circulation of 77,405, with Sunday circulation of 88,336...

 and the Trentonian
Trentonian
The Trentonian is a daily newspaper serving Trenton, New Jersey, USA, and the surrounding Mercer County community. The paper has a daily circulation of slightly more than 30,000 and a Sunday circulation of less than 28,000...

, as well as a monthly advertising magazine: "The City" Trenton N.E.W.S.. Radio station WKXW is also licensed to Trenton. Defunct periodicals include the Trenton True American.

Sports

Club League Venue Affiliate Established Championships
Trenton Thunder
Trenton Thunder
The Trenton Thunder are an American Minor League Baseball team and are the Double-A affiliate of the New York Yankees. The Thunder play in the Eastern Division of the Eastern League, and are the two-time defending league champions...

EL, Baseball Mercer County Waterfront Park
Mercer County Waterfront Park
Samuel J. Plumeri, Sr. Field at Mercer County Waterfront Park is a stadium in Trenton, New Jersey. It is the home baseball park for the Trenton Thunder of the Eastern League...

New York Yankees
New York Yankees
The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the The Bronx, New York. They compete in Major League Baseball in the American League's East Division...

1994 2
Trenton Titans
Trenton Titans
The Trenton Titans are a professional minor league ice hockey team that currently plays in the ECHL. The team participates in the Atlantic Division of the ECHL's Eastern Conference. The Titans play their home games at the Sun National Bank Center in Trenton, New Jersey. Established in 1999, the...

ECHL
ECHL
The ECHL is a mid-level professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey with teams scattered across the United States...

, Ice hockey
Sun National Bank Center Philadelphia Flyers
Philadelphia Flyers
The Philadelphia Flyers are a professional ice hockey team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League...

1999 1
Trenton Steel
Trenton Steel
The Trenton Steel is a professional indoor football team that began play in the Southern Indoor Football League in the 2011 season. The Steel are based in Trenton, New Jersey, with home games played at the Sun National Bank Center. The team made its home debut March 26, 2011, losing 76-73 to the...

SIFL
Southern Indoor Football League
The Southern Indoor Football League was an indoor football league based in the Southern and Eastern United States. The most recent incarnation of the league was a consolidation of an earlier league of the same name that was formed by Thom Hager along with Dan Blum, Robert Winfrey and Dan Ryan in...

, Indoor football
Sun National Bank Center N/A 2010 0


Because of Trenton's relative distance to New York City and Philadelphia, and because most homes in Mercer County receive network broadcasts from both cities, locals are sharply divided in fan loyalty between both cities. It is not uncommon to find fans of Philadelphia's Phillies, Eagles, 76ers, Union and Flyers cheering (and arguing) right along side New York Yankees, Mets, Nets, Knicks, Devils, Rangers, Jets, Red Bulls and Giants fans.

Between 1948 and 1979 Trenton Speedway
Trenton Speedway
Trenton Speedway was a racing facility located near Trenton, New Jersey at the New Jersey State Fairgrounds. Races for the United States' premier open-wheel and full-bodied racing series of the times were held at Trenton Speedway.-Racing history:...

 hosted world class auto racing. It was actually located in adjacent Hamilton Township. Famous drivers such as Jim Clark
Jim Clark
James "Jim" Clark, Jr OBE was a British Formula One racing driver from Scotland, who won two World Championships, in 1963 and 1965....

, A. J. Foyt
A. J. Foyt
Anthony Joseph Foyt, Jr., or as he is universally known as in motorsports circles, A. J. Foyt , is a retired American automobile racing driver. He raced in numerous genres of motorsports. His open wheel racing includes USAC Champ cars and midget cars. He raced stock cars in NASCAR and USAC. He won...

, Mario Andretti
Mario Andretti
Mario Gabriele Andretti is a retired Italian American world champion racing driver, one of the most successful Americans in the history of the sport. He is one of only two drivers to win races in Formula One, IndyCar, World Sportscar Championship and NASCAR...

, Al Unser
Al Unser
Alfred "Al" Unser is a former American automobile racing driver, the younger brother of fellow racing drivers Jerry and Bobby Unser, and father of Al Unser, Jr....

, Bobby Unser
Bobby Unser
Robert William "Bobby" Unser is a retired U.S. automobile racer. He is the brother of Al Unser, Jerry Unser and Louie Unser, the father of Robby Unser, and the uncle of Al Unser, Jr. and Johnny Unser...

, Richard Petty
Richard Petty
Richard Lee Petty is a former NASCAR driver who raced in the Strictly Stock/Grand National Era and the NASCAR Winston Cup Series...

 and Bobby Allison
Bobby Allison
Robert Arthur Allison is a former NASCAR Winston Cup driver and was named one of NASCAR's 50 greatest drivers. His two sons, Clifford Allison and Davey Allison followed him into racing, and both died within a year of each other....

 raced on the one mile (1.6 km) asphalt oval and then re-configured 1½ mile race track. The speedway, which closed in 1980, was part of the larger New Jersey State Fairgrounds complex, which also closed in 1983. The former site of the speedway and fairgrounds is now the Grounds for Sculpture
Grounds for Sculpture
Grounds For Sculpture is a sculpture park and museum located in Hamilton Township, Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, on the former site of the New Jersey State Fairgrounds...

.

The Trenton Thunder
Trenton Thunder
The Trenton Thunder are an American Minor League Baseball team and are the Double-A affiliate of the New York Yankees. The Thunder play in the Eastern Division of the Eastern League, and are the two-time defending league champions...

, a Double-A minor league team affiliated with the New York Yankees
New York Yankees
The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the The Bronx, New York. They compete in Major League Baseball in the American League's East Division...

 that is owned by Joe Plumeri, plays in Trenton. The team plays at Samuel J. Plumeri, Sr. Field, the 6,341-seat stadium which Plumeri named after his father in 1999.

Points of interest

  • Cadwalader Park - city park designed by landscape architect
    Landscape architect
    A landscape architect is a person involved in the planning, design and sometimes direction of a landscape, garden, or distinct space. The professional practice is known as landscape architecture....

     Frederick Law Olmsted
    Frederick Law Olmsted
    Frederick Law Olmsted was an American journalist, social critic, public administrator, and landscape designer. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture, although many scholars have bestowed that title upon Andrew Jackson Downing...

    . Olmsted is most famous for designing New York City's Central Park
    Central Park
    Central Park is a public park in the center of Manhattan in New York City, United States. The park initially opened in 1857, on of city-owned land. In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they entitled the Greensward Plan...

    .
  • Friends Burying Ground
    Friends Burying Ground, Trenton
    Friends Burying Ground is a cemetery in Trenton in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The cemetery is located on the west side of North Montgomery Street, north of East Hanover Street.-Notable burials:...

  • New Jersey State House
    New Jersey State House
    The New Jersey State House is located in Trenton and is the house of government for the U.S. state of New Jersey. After the Maryland State Capitol in Annapolis, it is the second oldest state house in continuous legislative use in the United States...

  • War Memorial Auditorium
  • New Jersey State Library
    New Jersey State Library
    The New Jersey State Library, based in Trenton, New Jersey, was established in 1796 to serve the information needs of New Jersey's Governor, Legislature and courts. The State Library is also responsible to assist in the provision of library and information services to all New Jersey...

  • New Jersey State Museum
    New Jersey State Museum
    The New Jersey State Museum is located at 205 West State Street in Trenton, New Jersey, United States, overlooking the Delaware River. The Museum is operated as part of the New Jersey Department of State. General admission is free....

  • Old Barracks
    Old Barracks
    The Old Barracks Museum, also known as Old Barracks, in Trenton, New Jersey, are the only remaining colonial barracks in New Jersey. It is the last of five such barracks authorized by the colony in 1758 to house soldiers in the French and Indian War. It housed about 300 soldiers at a time...

     - last remaining colonial barracks in the country.
  • William Trent House
    William Trent House
    The William Trent House , the oldest house in Trenton was built for William Trent. He founded the eponymous town, which became the capital of New Jersey. It has served as the residence for several Governors....

  • Trenton City Hall
    Trenton City Hall
    Trenton City Hall, is located in Trenton, New Jersey. The building was built in 1907 and added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 30, 1978....

  • The Trenton City Museum
  • Trenton Battle Monument
    Trenton Battle Monument
    The Trenton Battle Monument is a column-type monument in Trenton, New Jersey. It commemorates the December 26, 1776 Battle of Trenton, a pivotal victory for the Continental forces during the American Revolutionary War.-Description:...


Notable residents

Some well-known Americans who were born or have lived in Trenton include:
  • Charles Conrad Abbott
    Charles Conrad Abbott
    Charles Conrad Abbott was an American archaeologist and naturalist, born at Trenton, New Jersey. He studied medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and served as a surgeon in the Union Army during the Civil War...

     (1843–1919), archaeologist and naturalist
    Naturalist
    Naturalist may refer to:* Practitioner of natural history* Conservationist* Advocate of naturalism * Naturalist , autobiography-See also:* The American Naturalist, periodical* Naturalism...

    .
  • Samuel Alito
    Samuel Alito
    Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. is an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He was nominated by President George W. Bush and has served on the court since January 31, 2006....

     (born 1950), Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
    Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
    Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States...

    .
  • George Antheil
    George Antheil
    George Antheil was an American avant-garde composer, pianist, author and inventor. A self-described "Bad Boy of Music", his modernist compositions amazed and appalled listeners in Europe and the US during the 1920s with their cacophonous celebration of mechanical devices.Returning permanently to...

     (1900–59), pianist, composer, writer and inventor.
  • Henry W. Antheil, Jr.
    Henry W. Antheil, Jr.
    Henry William Antheil, Jr. was born in Trenton, New Jersey, USA.Henry W. Antheil, Jr., younger brother of noted composer George Antheil, was a clerk at the U.S. legation in Helsinki...

     (1912–40), diplomatic code clerk, honored for service to United States.
  • Bo Belinsky
    Bo Belinsky
    Robert "Bo" Belinsky was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, who became an instant southern California celebrity as a rookie with the original Los Angeles Angels, especially when the fourth of his season-opening four straight wins was a no-hit, no-run game against his former...

     (1936–2001), professional baseball
    Baseball
    Baseball is a bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of nine players each. The aim is to score runs by hitting a thrown ball with a bat and touching a series of four bases arranged at the corners of a ninety-foot diamond...

     player.
  • Elvin Bethea
    Elvin Bethea
    Elvin Lamont Bethea is a former American football defensive end who played his entire career with the Houston Oilers...

     (born 1936), Pro Football Hall of Fame
    Pro Football Hall of Fame
    The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of professional football in the United States with an emphasis on the National Football League . It opened in Canton, Ohio, on September 7, 1963, with 17 charter inductees...

     defensive end; played entire NFL career with the Houston Oilers
  • John T. Bird
    John T. Bird
    John Taylor Bird was an American Democratic Party politician and businessman who represented New Jersey's 3rd congressional district from 1869 to 1873....

     (1829–1911), represented New Jersey's 3rd congressional district
    New Jersey's 3rd congressional district
    New Jersey's Third Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Jon Runyan. It is a swing district, with a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+1. Former NFL player Republican Jon Runyan defeated John Adler in the 2010 House elections...

     (1869–73)
  • James Bishop
    James Bishop (Congressman)
    James Bishop was an American Opposition Party politician, who represented in the United States House of Representatives from 1855–1857....

     (1816–95), represented in the U.S. House of Representatives (1855–57)
  • Edward Bloor
    Edward Bloor
    Edward William Bloor is an American author of young adult novels best known for Tangerine and London Calling.Edward Bloor...

     (born 1950), novelist.
  • Steve Braun (born 1948), professional baseball player.
  • J. Hart Brewer
    J. Hart Brewer
    John Hart Brewer was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1881 to 1885...

     (1844–1900), represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo.-Counties and municipalities in the district:...

     (1881–85)
  • Tal Brody
    Tal Brody
    Tal Brody is an American-Israeli former basketball player, and current Goodwill Ambassador of Israel, who lives in Israel. Brody was drafted # 12 in the National Basketball Association draft, but chose to pass up an NBA career to instead play basketball in Israel...

     (born 1943), Euroleague basketball shooting guard, drafted # 12 in the NBA draft.
  • Betty Bronson
    Betty Bronson
    Betty Bronson was an American television and film actress who began her career during the silent film era. She was a famous actress in silent and sound films.-Film career:...

     (1907–71), actress.
  • James Buchanan
    James Buchanan (New Jersey)
    James Buchanan was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1885 to 1893....

     (1839–1900), represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo.-Counties and municipalities in the district:...

     from 1885 to 1893.
  • Shawn Corey Carter
    Jay-Z
    Shawn Corey Carter , better known by his stage name Jay-Z, is an American rapper, record producer, entrepreneur, and occasional actor. He is one of the most financially successful hip hop artists and entrepreneurs in America, having a net worth of over $450 million as of 2010...

     (born 1969, a.k.a. Jay Z), rap mogul, CEO.
  • George Case
    George Case
    George Washington Case was an American left and right fielder in Major League Baseball who played most of his career for the Washington Senators...

     (1915–89), outfielder
    Outfielder
    Outfielder is a generic term applied to each of the people playing in the three defensive positions in baseball farthest from the batter. These defenders are the left fielder, the center fielder, and the right fielder...

     for the Washington Senators
    Minnesota Twins
    The Minnesota Twins are a professional baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. They play in the Central Division of Major League Baseball's American League. The team is named after the Twin Cities area of Minneapolis and St. Paul. They played in Metropolitan Stadium from 1961 to 1981 and the...

    .
  • Terrance Cauthen
    Terrance Cauthen
    Terrance Davin Cauthen is an American boxer. Nicknamed "Heat", Cauthen won the Lightweight Bronze medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics.Cauthen grew up in Trenton, New Jersey and trained in Philadelphia....

     (born 1976), lightweight boxer, won bronze medal
    Bronze medal
    A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games in St...

     at 1996 Summer Olympics
    1996 Summer Olympics
    The 1996 Summer Olympics of Atlanta, officially known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and unofficially known as the Centennial Olympics, was an international multi-sport event which was celebrated in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States....

  • Richie Cole
    Richie Cole (musician)
    Richie Cole is a jazz alto saxophonist composer and arranger born in Trenton, New Jersey, U.S. and is a graduate of Ewing High School, Ewing New Jersey....

     (born 1948), jazz
    Jazz
    Jazz is a musical style that originated at the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States. It was born out of a mix of African and European music traditions. From its early development until the present, jazz has incorporated music from 19th and 20th...

     alto saxophonist.
  • Richard Crooks
    Richard Crooks
    Richard Alexander Crooks was an American tenor and a leading singer at the New York Metropolitan Opera.-Biography:He was born on June 26, 1900 in Trenton, New Jersey...

     (1900–72), tenor
    Tenor
    The tenor is a type of male singing voice and is the highest male voice within the modal register. The typical tenor voice lies between C3, the C one octave below middle C, to the A above middle C in choral music, and up to high C in solo work. The low extreme for tenors is roughly B2...

     at the New York Metropolitan Opera.
  • David Dinkins
    David Dinkins
    David Norman Dinkins is a former politician from New York City. He was the Mayor of New York City from 1990 through 1993; he was the first and is, to date, the only African American to hold that office.-Early life:...

     (born 1927), first black mayor of New York City
    Mayor of New York City
    The Mayor of the City of New York is head of the executive branch of New York City's government. The mayor's office administers all city services, public property, police and fire protection, most public agencies, and enforces all city and state laws within New York City.The budget overseen by the...

    .
  • Al Downing (born 1941), professional baseball
    Baseball
    Baseball is a bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of nine players each. The aim is to score runs by hitting a thrown ball with a bat and touching a series of four bases arranged at the corners of a ninety-foot diamond...

     player.
  • Samuel Gibbs French
    Samuel Gibbs French
    History of Salem County by Joseph S. Sickler, pub 1937 pp-243, 276-277...

     (1818–1910), Major General
    Major General
    Major general or major-general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. A major general is a high-ranking officer, normally subordinate to the rank of lieutenant general and senior to the ranks of brigadier and brigadier general...

     in the Confederate States Army
    Confederate States Army
    The Confederate States Army was the army of the Confederate States of America while the Confederacy existed during the American Civil War. On February 8, 1861, delegates from the seven Deep South states which had already declared their secession from the United States of America adopted the...

    .
  • Dave Gallagher
    Dave Gallagher
    David Thomas Gallagher , is a former professional baseball player who played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1987-1995.-Teams:* Cleveland Indians 1987* Chicago White Sox 1988-90* Baltimore Orioles 1990...

     (born 1960), professional baseball player.
  • Greg Grant
    Greg Grant
    Gregory Alan 'Greg' Grant is a retired American professional basketball player.Growing up in a broken home, Grant worked in a fish market after high school...

     (born 1966), NBA basketball player.
  • Roxanne Hart
    Roxanne Hart
    Roxanne Hart is an American television, film and stage actress. She may be best known for her role as Brenda Wyatt in the 1986 film Highlander. She is also known for the role of Nurse Camille Shutt on the Medical drama Chicago Hope....

     (born 1952), actress who appeared in the film Highlander
    Highlander (film)
    Highlander is a 1986 fantasy action film directed by Russell Mulcahy and based on a story by Gregory Widen. It stars Christopher Lambert, Sean Connery, Clancy Brown, and Roxanne Hart. The film depicts the climax of an ages-old battle between immortal warriors, depicted through interwoven past and...

     and on television in Chicago Hope
    Chicago Hope
    Chicago Hope is an American medical drama series created by David E. Kelley that ran from September 18, 1994, to May 5, 2000. It takes place in a fictional private charity hospital.-Premise:The show stars Mandy Patinkin as Dr...

    .
  • Roy Hinson
    Roy Hinson
    Roy Hinson is a retired American professional basketball player who was selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 1st round of the 1983 NBA Draft. Hinson attended Franklin H.S. in Franklin Township, New Jersey. He then spent his college career at Rutgers University in nearby New Brunswick, NJ...

     (born 1961), professional basketball
    Basketball
    Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules...

     player.
  • Charles R. Howell
    Charles R. Howell
    Charles Robert Howell was an American Democratic Party politician who represented in the United States House of Representatives from 1949 to 1955....

     (1904–73), represented in the U.S. House of Representatives (1949–55)
  • Elijah C. Hutchinson
    Elijah C. Hutchinson
    Elijah Cubberley Hutchinson was an American Republican Party politician who represented from 1915 to 1923....

     (1855–1932), represented (1915–23)
  • William J. Johnston
    William J. Johnston
    William J. Johnston, Sr., was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.-Biography:...

     (1918–90), Medal of Honor
    Medal of Honor
    The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President, in the name of Congress, upon members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her...

     recipient for gallantry during World War II
    World War II
    World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

    .
  • Dahntay Jones
    Dahntay Jones
    Dahntay Lavall Jones is an American professional basketball player, currently playing for the Indiana Pacers of the NBA.Originally a student at Rutgers University, Jones transferred to Duke University...

     (born 1980), professional basketball
    Basketball
    Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules...

     player.
  • Nicholas Katzenbach
    Nicholas Katzenbach
    Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach is an American lawyer who served as United States Attorney General during the Lyndon B. Johnson administration.-Early life:...

     (born 1922), U.S. Attorney General in the Johnson Administration.
  • Patrick Kerney
    Patrick Kerney
    -Atlanta Falcons:Kerney was drafted as the thirtieth overall pick in the 1999 NFL Draft by the Atlanta Falcons, wearing the number 97 jersey. The Falcons signed Kerney to a 5-year $5.6 million contract. As a rookie, Kerney started two games and recorded 25 tackles and 2.5 sacks...

     (born 1976), professional football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     player.
  • Tad Kornegay
    Tad Kornegay
    Tad Kornegay is an American Canadian football player for the BC Lions of the Canadian Football League. Previously, Kornegay joined the Saskatchewan Roughriders just prior to the start of the 2007 regular season on June 24, 2007 via a trade with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. In 2011, Kornegay was traded...

     (born 1982) defensive back for the Saskatchewan Roughriders
    Saskatchewan Roughriders
    The Saskatchewan Roughriders are a Canadian Football League team based in Regina, Saskatchewan. They were founded in 1910. They play their home games at 2940 10th Avenue in Regina, which has been the team's home base for its entire history, even prior to the construction of Mosaic Stadium at Taylor...

     in the Canadian Football League
    Canadian Football League
    The Canadian Football League or CFL is a professional sports league located in Canada. The CFL is the highest level of competition in Canadian football, a form of gridiron football closely related to American football....

    .
  • Ernie Kovacs
    Ernie Kovacs
    Ernie Kovacs was a Hungarian American comedian and actor.Kovacs' uninhibited, often ad-libbed, and visually experimental comedic style came to influence numerous television comedy programs for years after his death in an automobile accident...

     (1919–62), television comedian and film actor.
  • Sol Linowitz
    Sol Linowitz
    Sol Myron Linowitz was an American diplomat, lawyer, and businessman born in Trenton, NJ.Linowitz helped negotiate the return of the Panama Canal to Panama under the direction of President Jimmy Carter...

     (1913–2005), diplomat, lawyer, and businessman
  • Judith Light
    Judith Light
    Judith Ellen Light is an American actress. Her television roles include Karen Wolek on the soap opera One Life to Live, Angela Bower on the sitcom Who's the Boss?, Claire Meade on ABC's TV series Ugly Betty and Judge Elizabeth "Liz" Donnelly on Law & Order Special Victims Unit.-Early life:Light...

     (born 1949), actress.
  • Amy Locane
    Amy Locane
    -Career:Locane was born in Trenton, New Jersey. She starred as one of the original cast on the television series Melrose Place, in which she played Sandy, an aspiring actress who waited tables at the show's bar hangout, Shooters. She left Melrose Place after its first 12 episodes of season one and...

     (born 1971), actress.
  • Anthony Maddox, co-founder of MadVision Entertainment.
  • Kareem McKenzie
    Kareem McKenzie
    Kareem Michael McKenzie is a player for the New York Giants of the National Football League.McKenzie played only two years of high school football at Willingboro High School in Willingboro Township, New Jersey....

     (born 1979), offensive tackle for the New York Giants
    New York Giants
    The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey, representing the New York City metropolitan area. The Giants are currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference in the National Football League...

     of the National Football League
    National Football League
    The National Football League is the highest level of professional American football in the United States, and is considered the top professional American football league in the world. It was formed by eleven teams in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing...

    .
  • N. Gregory Mankiw
    N. Gregory Mankiw
    Nicholas Gregory "Greg" Mankiw is an American macroeconomist and Professor of Economics at Harvard University. Mankiw is known in academia for his work on New Keynesian economics....

     (born 1958), macroeconomist.
  • Maury Muehleisen
    Maury Muehleisen
    Maury Muehleisen was an American-born musician, songwriter, and artist best known for his studio work, live accompaniment, and impact on the music of Jim Croce. His unassuming style and exquisite guitar skills were a perfect balance to Croce’s seemingly rough-hewn experiences, stage presence, and...

     (born 1949), guitarist and songwriting partner for Jim Croce
    Jim Croce
    James Joseph "Jim" Croce January 10, 1943 – September 20, 1973 was an American singer-songwriter. Between 1966 and 1973, Croce released five studio albums and 11 singles...

  • New Atlantic, alternative rock band
  • Zebulon Pike
    Zebulon Pike
    Zebulon Montgomery Pike Jr. was an American officer and explorer for whom Pikes Peak in Colorado is named. As a United States Army captain in 1806-1807, he led the Pike Expedition to explore and document the southern portion of the Louisiana Purchase and to find the headwaters of the Red River,...

     (1779–1813), explorer and namesake of Pikes Peak
    Pikes Peak
    Pikes Peak is a mountain in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, west of Colorado Springs, Colorado, in El Paso County in the United States of America....

    .
  • Joe Plumeri (born 1944), Chairman & CEO of Willis Group Holdings
    Willis Group Holdings
    Willis Group Holdings is a global insurance broker headquartered in the Willis Building, London, United Kingdom. It has more than 400 offices in 120 countries, and approximately 17,000 employees...

    , and owner of the Trenton Thunder
    Trenton Thunder
    The Trenton Thunder are an American Minor League Baseball team and are the Double-A affiliate of the New York Yankees. The Thunder play in the Eastern Division of the Eastern League, and are the two-time defending league champions...

  • D. Lane Powers
    D. Lane Powers
    David Lane Powers was an American Republican Party politician who represented in the United States House of Representatives from 1933 to 1945....

     (1896–1968), represented in the U.S. House of Representatives (1933–45)
  • Amy Robinson
    Amy Robinson
    Amy Robinson is an American actress and film producer. She got her first film role as an actress as the female lead in Martin Scorsese's breakthrough hit Mean Streets and ultimately went on to produce his film After Hours among many others...

     (born 1948), actress and film producer
    Film producer
    A film producer oversees and delivers a film project to all relevant parties while preserving the integrity, voice and vision of the film. They will also often take on some financial risk by using their own money, especially during the pre-production period, before a film is fully financed.The...

    .
  • Dennis Rodman
    Dennis Rodman
    Dennis Keith Rodman is a retired American Hall of Fame professional basketball player of the National Basketball Association's Detroit Pistons, San Antonio Spurs, Chicago Bulls, Los Angeles Lakers and Dallas Mavericks. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, he was nicknamed "Dennis the Menace" and "The...

     (born 1961), professional basketball player.
  • Bob Ryan
    Bob Ryan
    Bob Ryan is an American sportswriter for The Boston Globe. He has been described as "the quintessential American sportswriter" and a basketball guru and is well known for his coverage of the sport including his famous stories covering the Boston Celtics in the 1970s. After graduating from Boston...

     (born 1946), sportswriter, regular contributor on the ESPN
    ESPN
    Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, commonly known as ESPN, is an American global cable television network focusing on sports-related programming including live and pre-taped event telecasts, sports talk shows, and other original programming....

     show Around the Horn
    Around the Horn
    Around the Horn is a daily, half-hour sports roundtable on ESPN filmed in Washington, D.C. It airs at 5:00 pm ET, as part of a sports talk hour with Pardon the Interruption. The show is currently hosted by Tony Reali.-History:Around the Horn premiered on November 4, 2002, hosted by Max Kellerman...

    .
  • Daniel Bailey Ryall
    Daniel Bailey Ryall
    Daniel Bailey Ryall was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey on a general ticket in the United States House of Representatives from 1839-1841....

     (1798–1864), U.S. Representative from New Jersey (1839–41)
  • Antonin Scalia
    Antonin Scalia
    Antonin Gregory Scalia is an American jurist who serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. As the longest-serving justice on the Court, Scalia is the Senior Associate Justice...

     (born 1936), Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
    Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
    Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States...

  • Frank D. Schroth
    Frank D. Schroth
    Frank D. Schroth was an American newspaper publisher who owned and operated the Brooklyn Eagle from 1938 until its demise in 1955 after a strike by The Newspaper Guild.-Life and career:...

     (1884–1974), owner of the Brooklyn Eagle
    Brooklyn Eagle
    The Brooklyn Daily Bulletin began publishing when the original Eagle folded in 1955. In 1996 it merged with a newly revived Brooklyn Daily Eagle, and now publishes a morning paper five days a week under the Brooklyn Daily Eagle name...

    , had earlier worked as a reporter at The Times
    The Times (Trenton)
    The Times is a daily newspaper owned by Advance Publications that serves the Mercer County, New Jersey area, with a strong focus on the government of New Jersey. The paper had a daily circulation of 77,405, with Sunday circulation of 88,336...

  • Thomas N. Schroth
    Thomas N. Schroth
    Thomas Nolan Schroth was an American journalist who specialized in coverage of inside the Beltway politics as editor of Congressional Quarterly starting in 1955 and then establishing The National Journal in 1969 after he was fired from CQ due to policy conflicts.-Early life and career:Schroth was...

     (1921–2009), editor of Congressional Quarterly
    Congressional Quarterly
    Congressional Quarterly, Inc., or CQ, is a privately owned publishing company that produces a number of publications reporting primarily on the United States Congress...

     and founder of The National Journal.
  • Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.
    Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.
    General Herbert Norman Schwarzkopf KCB , also known as "Stormin' Norman" and "The Bear", is a retired United States Army General who, while he served as Commander of U.S. Central Command, was commander of the Coalition Forces in the Gulf War of 1991.-Early life:Schwarzkopf was born in Trenton, New...

     (born 1934), Commander-in-Chief
    Commander-in-Chief
    A commander-in-chief is the commander of a nation's military forces or significant element of those forces. In the latter case, the force element may be defined as those forces within a particular region or those forces which are associated by function. As a practical term it refers to the military...

     of the U.S. Central Command in the Gulf War
    Gulf War
    The Persian Gulf War , commonly referred to as simply the Gulf War, was a war waged by a U.N.-authorized coalition force from 34 nations led by the United States, against Iraq in response to Iraq's invasion and annexation of Kuwait.The war is also known under other names, such as the First Gulf...

    .
  • Charles Skelton
    Charles Skelton
    Charles Skelton was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1851 to 1855....

     (1806–79), represented New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's 2nd congressional district
    New Jersey's Second Congressional District is currently represented by Republican Frank LoBiondo.-Counties and municipalities in the district:...

     in the U.S. House of Representatives (1851–55)
  • Sommore
    Sommore
    Sommore is an actress and comedienne from Trenton, New Jersey. She is the half sister of actress Nia Long....

     (born 1967), comedian.
  • Robert Stempel
    Robert Stempel
    Robert Carl Stempel was a former Chairman and CEO of General Motors . He joined GM in 1958 as a design engineer at Oldsmobile and was key in the development of the front-wheel drive Toronado...

     (born 1933), chairman and CEO of General Motors
    General Motors
    General Motors Company , commonly known as GM, formerly incorporated as General Motors Corporation, is an American multinational automotive corporation headquartered in Detroit, Michigan and the world's second-largest automaker in 2010...

    .
  • Gary Stills
    Gary Stills
    Gary Stills is an American football linebacker who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 1999 NFL Draft. He played college football at West Virginia....

     (born 1974), professional football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     player.
  • Mike Tiernan
    Mike Tiernan
    Michael Joseph Tiernan , nicknamed "Silent Mike", was an American right fielder in Major League Baseball who played exclusively for the New York Giants from 1887 to 1899. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, his debut game was on April 30, 1887. His final game was played on July 31, 1899...

     (1867–1918), major league baseball player.
  • Ty Treadway
    Ty Treadway
    Tyrus Richard "Ty" Treadway is a game show host, actor and talk show host. Treadway had co-hosted Soap Talk with Lisa Rinna.-Biography:Ty was born and raised in Trenton, New Jersey to Richard and Mary Lou Treadway...

     (born 1967), host of Merv Griffin's Crosswords
    Merv Griffin's Crosswords
    Merv Griffin's Crosswords is an American game show based on crossword puzzles. The show was created by its namesake, Merv Griffin, who died shortly after beginning production on the series...

    .
  • Troy Vincent
    Troy Vincent
    Troy Darnell Vincent is a former Defensive Back for the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Dolphins with the 7th overall pick in the 1992 NFL Draft. He played college football at Wisconsin.Mr...

     (born 1971), professional American football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     player, President of the NFL Players Association.
  • Allan B. Walsh
    Allan B. Walsh
    Allan Bartholomew Walsh was an American Democratic Party politician from New Jersey who represented the 4th congressional district from 1913 to 1915....

     (1874–1953), represented the 4th congressional district
    New Jersey's 4th congressional district
    New Jersey's 4th Congressional District elects one member of congress by the first past the post method, it is currently represented by Republican Chris Smith. He has represented the district since 1981....

     (1913–15)
  • Charlie Weis
    Charlie Weis
    Charles Joseph "Charlie" Weis is an American football coach. He currently serves as offensive coordinator for the Florida Gators. For five years, from December 2004 through 2009, he was the head football coach at the University of Notre Dame...

     (born 1956), Notre Dame
    University of Notre Dame
    The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a Catholic research university located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated community north of the city of South Bend, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States...

     football coach.
  • Wise Intelligent of Poor Righteous Teachers
    Poor Righteous Teachers
    Poor Righteous Teachers is a hip hop group from Trenton, New Jersey, founded in 1989. Often referred to as PRT by its fans, Poor Righteous Teachers are known as pro-Black conscious hip hop artists, with musical content inspired by the teachings of the Nation of Gods and Earths. Wise Intelligent, as...

    , hip-hop group.
  • Ira W. Wood
    Ira W. Wood
    Ira Wells Wood was an American Republican Party politician who represented from 1904 to 1913....

     (1856–1931), represented (1904–13)

External links

The source of this article is wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
 
x
OK