Catholic University of Leuven
Overview
 
The Catholic University of Leuven, or of Louvain, was the largest, oldest and most prominent university in Belgium
Belgium
Belgium , officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a federal state in Western Europe. It is a founding member of the European Union and hosts the EU's headquarters, and those of several other major international organisations such as NATO.Belgium is also a member of, or affiliated to, many...

. The university was founded in 1425 as the University of Leuven by John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant was the son of Antoine of Burgundy, Duke of Brabant, Lothier and Limburg.John IV was the second Brabantian ruler of the House of Valois....

 and approved by a Papal bull
Papal bull
A Papal bull is a particular type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church. It is named after the bulla that was appended to the end in order to authenticate it....

 by Pope Martin V.

During France's occupation of Belgium in the French Revolutionary Wars
French Revolutionary Wars
The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states...

, the university closed by a decree of the French Republic. After Belgium was annexed by the United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands is the unofficial name used to refer to Kingdom of the Netherlands during the period after it was first created from part of the First French Empire and before the new kingdom of Belgium split out in 1830...

, a State University of Louvain was founded in 1816, lasting until 1835.
Encyclopedia
The Catholic University of Leuven, or of Louvain, was the largest, oldest and most prominent university in Belgium
Belgium
Belgium , officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a federal state in Western Europe. It is a founding member of the European Union and hosts the EU's headquarters, and those of several other major international organisations such as NATO.Belgium is also a member of, or affiliated to, many...

. The university was founded in 1425 as the University of Leuven by John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant was the son of Antoine of Burgundy, Duke of Brabant, Lothier and Limburg.John IV was the second Brabantian ruler of the House of Valois....

 and approved by a Papal bull
Papal bull
A Papal bull is a particular type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church. It is named after the bulla that was appended to the end in order to authenticate it....

 by Pope Martin V.

During France's occupation of Belgium in the French Revolutionary Wars
French Revolutionary Wars
The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states...

, the university closed by a decree of the French Republic. After Belgium was annexed by the United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands is the unofficial name used to refer to Kingdom of the Netherlands during the period after it was first created from part of the First French Empire and before the new kingdom of Belgium split out in 1830...

, a State University of Louvain was founded in 1816, lasting until 1835. In 1834, a few years after Belgium gained its independence, the Catholic University of Leuven was refounded, taking this new name, and it is identified with the Old University.

In 1968 the university split to form two institutions:
  • Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium.It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, and is a prominent part of the city, home to the university since 1425...

    , Dutch-speaking, situated in Leuven
    Leuven
    Leuven is the capital of the province of Flemish Brabant in the Flemish Region, Belgium...

    ; and
  • Université catholique de Louvain
    Université catholique de Louvain
    The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known, especially in Belgium, as UCL, is Belgium's largest French-speaking university. It is located in Louvain-la-Neuve and in Brussels...

    , French-speaking, situated in nearby Louvain-la-Neuve
    Louvain-la-Neuve
    Louvain-la-Neuve is a planned city in the municipality of Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, situated 30 km southeast of Brussels, in the French-speaking part of the country...

    , in Wallonia.


This entry deals with the historic university, 1425–1797 and 1834–1968. For the current successor institutions and their separate development since 1968, see the individual articles linked above.

The Old University (1425–1797)

In the 15th century the city of Leuven, with the support of John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant
John IV, Duke of Brabant was the son of Antoine of Burgundy, Duke of Brabant, Lothier and Limburg.John IV was the second Brabantian ruler of the House of Valois....

, made a formal request to the Holy See
Holy See
The Holy See is the episcopal jurisdiction of the Catholic Church in Rome, in which its Bishop is commonly known as the Pope. It is the preeminent episcopal see of the Catholic Church, forming the central government of the Church. As such, diplomatically, and in other spheres the Holy See acts and...

 for a university. Pope Martin V
Pope Martin V
Pope Martin V , born Odo Colonna, was Pope from 1417 to 1431. His election effectively ended the Western Schism .-Biography:...

 issued a papal bull
Papal bull
A Papal bull is a particular type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church. It is named after the bulla that was appended to the end in order to authenticate it....

 dated 9 December 1425 founding the University in Leuven as a Studium Generale. In its early years, the university was modelled on those of Paris
Paris
Paris is the capital and largest city in France, situated on the river Seine, in northern France, at the heart of the Île-de-France region...

, Cologne
Cologne
Cologne is Germany's fourth-largest city , and is the largest city both in the Germany Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than ten million inhabitants.Cologne is located on both sides of the...

 and Vienna
Vienna
Vienna is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Austria and one of the nine states of Austria. Vienna is Austria's primary city, with a population of about 1.723 million , and is by far the largest city in Austria, as well as its cultural, economic, and political centre...

. The university flourished in the 16th century due to the presence of famous scholars and professors, such as Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens (Pope Adrian VI
Pope Adrian VI
Pope Adrian VI , born Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, served as Pope from 9 January 1522 until his death some 18 months later...

), Desiderius Erasmus
Desiderius Erasmus
Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus , known as Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, and a theologian....

, Johannes Molanus, Joan Lluís Vives, Andreas Vesalius, Ferdinand Verbiest
Ferdinand Verbiest
Father Ferdinand Verbiest was a Flemish Jesuit missionary in China during the Qing dynasty. He was born in Pittem near Tielt in Flanders, later part of the modern state of Belgium. He is known as Nan Huairen in Chinese...

 and Gerardus Mercator
Gerardus Mercator
thumb|right|200px|Gerardus MercatorGerardus Mercator was a cartographer, born in Rupelmonde in the Hapsburg County of Flanders, part of the Holy Roman Empire. He is remembered for the Mercator projection world map, which is named after him...

.

The State University (1816–1835)

After the French Revolutionary Wars
French Revolutionary Wars
The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states...

, by the Treaty of Campo Formio
Treaty of Campo Formio
The Treaty of Campo Formio was signed on 18 October 1797 by Napoleon Bonaparte and Count Philipp von Cobenzl as representatives of revolutionary France and the Austrian monarchy...

, this region was ceded to the French Republic by Austria
Austria
Austria , officially the Republic of Austria , is a landlocked country of roughly 8.4 million people in Central Europe. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Slovakia and Hungary to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the...

 in exchange for the Republic of Venice
Republic of Venice
The Republic of Venice or Venetian Republic was a state originating from the city of Venice in Northeastern Italy. It existed for over a millennium, from the late 7th century until 1797. It was formally known as the Most Serene Republic of Venice and is often referred to as La Serenissima, in...

. Once formally integrated into the French Republic, a law dating to 1793 mandating that all universities in France be closed came into effect. The University of Leuven was abolished by decree of the Département of Dijle on October 25, 1797.

The region next became part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands
United Kingdom of the Netherlands is the unofficial name used to refer to Kingdom of the Netherlands during the period after it was first created from part of the First French Empire and before the new kingdom of Belgium split out in 1830...

 (1815–1830), and William I of the Netherlands
William I of the Netherlands
William I Frederick, born Willem Frederik Prins van Oranje-Nassau , was a Prince of Orange and the first King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg....

 founded a new university in 1816 in Leuven as a state university .

The Catholic University (1834–1968)

In 1830 Belgium became independent of the Netherlands. Belgian bishops founded a new Roman Catholic university in 1834, at Mechelen
Mechelen
Mechelen Footnote: Mechelen became known in English as 'Mechlin' from which the adjective 'Mechlinian' is derived...

. In 1835 the recently founded Catholic University of Mechlin
Catholic University of Mechlin
The Catholic University of Mechlin was a university that was founded in Mechelen , Belgium, on November 8, 1834 by the bishops of Belgium.The bishops aimed to create a university "to accommodate any doctrine from the Holy Apostolic See and to repudiate anything that does not flow from this august...

 moved to Leuven, and changed its name to Catholic University of Leuven, where the State University had been closed. This is generally seen as a refounding of the old University of Leuven, although the Belgian Court of Cassation
Court of Cassation (Belgium)
The Court of Cassation is the main court of last resort in Belgium.It was originally modelled after the French Cour de cassation. Its jurisdiction and powers are similar to those of its French counterpart....

 ruled that the two entities are legally distinct.

In 1914, during World War I
World War I
World War I , which was predominantly called the World War or the Great War from its occurrence until 1939, and the First World War or World War I thereafter, was a major war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918...

, Leuven was looted by German troops. They set fire to a large part of the city, effectively destroying about half of it. The library was lost, as well as about 300,000 books, about 1000 incunabula; and a huge collection of manuscripts, such as the Easter Island
Easter Island
Easter Island is a Polynesian island in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, at the southeasternmost point of the Polynesian triangle. A special territory of Chile that was annexed in 1888, Easter Island is famous for its 887 extant monumental statues, called moai, created by the early Rapanui people...

 tablet bearing Rongorongo text E
Rongorongo text E
Text E of the rongorongo corpus, also known as Keiti, is one of two dozen known rongorongo texts, though it survives only in photographs and rubbings.-Other names:E is the standard designation, from Barthel...

. In the early stages of the war, Allied propaganda capitalized on the German destruction as a reflection on German Kultur.

The split (1962–1970)

From its beginning in 1834 the Catholic University of Louvain provided lectures only in French
French language
French is a Romance language spoken as a first language in France, the Romandy region in Switzerland, Wallonia and Brussels in Belgium, Monaco, the regions of Quebec and Acadia in Canada, and by various communities elsewhere. Second-language speakers of French are distributed throughout many parts...

. Latin was sometimes used in the theological Faculty. But in effect it was a French-language institution. Lectures in Dutch
Dutch language
Dutch is a West Germanic language and the native language of the majority of the population of the Netherlands, Belgium, and Suriname, the three member states of the Dutch Language Union. Most speakers live in the European Union, where it is a first language for about 23 million and a second...

, the other official language
Official language
An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in a particular country, state, or other jurisdiction. Typically a nation's official language will be the one used in that nation's courts, parliament and administration. However, official status can also be used to give a...

 of Belgium and the language actually spoken in Leuven, began to be provided in 1930.

In 1962, in line with constitutional reforms governing official language use, the French and Dutch sections of the university became autonomous within a common governing structure. Flemish nationalists
Flemish movement
The Flemish Movement is a popular term used to describe the political movement for emancipation and greater autonomy of the Belgian region of Flanders, for protection of the Dutch language, and for the over-all protection of Flemish culture and history....

 continued to demand a division of the university, and Dutch speakers expressed resentment at privileges given to French-speaking academic staff and the perceived disdain by the local French-speaking community for their Dutch-speaking neighbours. Leuven is within Flanders
Flanders
Flanders is the community of the Flemings but also one of the institutions in Belgium, and a geographical region located in parts of present-day Belgium, France and the Netherlands. "Flanders" can also refer to the northern part of Belgium that contains Brussels, Bruges, Ghent and Antwerp...

, the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium.

Tensions rose when a French-speaking social geographer
Social geography
Social geography is the branch of human geography that is most closely related to social theory in general and sociology in particular, dealing with the relation of social phenomena and its spatial components. Though the term itself has a tradition of more than 100 years, there is no consensus on...

 suggested in a televised lecture that an objective case could be made for changing the administrative status of the city of Leuven, to include it in a larger, bilingual 'Greater-Brussels'. Mainstream Flemish politicians and students began demonstrating under the slogan 'Leuven Vlaams - Walen Buiten' ('A Flemish Leuven - Walloons
Walloons
Walloons are a French-speaking people who live in Belgium, principally in Wallonia. Walloons are a distinctive community within Belgium, important historical and anthropological criteria bind Walloons to the French people. More generally, the term also refers to the inhabitants of the Walloon...

 out'). Student demonstrations increased in violence throughout the mid-60s. Student unrest and questions of discrimination against ethnic Flemish brought down the Belgian government in February 1968.

The dispute was resolved in June 1968 by turning the Dutch-language section of the university into the independent Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium.It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, and is a prominent part of the city, home to the university since 1425...

, which remained in Leuven. The French-speaking university, called the Université catholique de Louvain
Université catholique de Louvain
The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known, especially in Belgium, as UCL, is Belgium's largest French-speaking university. It is located in Louvain-la-Neuve and in Brussels...

, was moved to a greenfield
Greenfield land
Greenfield land is a term used to describe undeveloped land in a city or rural area either used for agriculture, landscape design, or left to naturally evolve...

 campus, Louvain-la-Neuve
Louvain-la-Neuve
Louvain-la-Neuve is a planned city in the municipality of Ottignies-Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, situated 30 km southeast of Brussels, in the French-speaking part of the country...

, 20 km southeast of Brussels where French is the official language. Acrimony about the split was long-lasting. Nowadays, however, research collaborations and student exchanges between the two "sister universities" take place with increasing frequency.

Library

The holdings of the modern Catholic University of Leuven date back to 1834. Its main collections were held in a building on Naamsestraat dating back to the 17th century. It should be noted that it was only the collections of the university since its refounding that were lost. The manuscripts and most valuable works of the pre-revolutionary Old University, were transported to the National Library in Paris, while the bulk of the holdings (at least officially) was transferred to the Central School of Brussels, the official legal successor of the Old University of Leuven
Old University of Leuven
The Old University of Leuven is the name historians give to the university, or studium generale, founded in Leuven, Brabant , in 1425, and closed in 1797, a week after the cession to the French Republic of the Austrian Netherlands and the principality of Liège by the Treaty of Campo Formio.When...

. The library of the Central School of Brussels had about 80,000 volumes, which then became part of the library of Brussels, and then the future Royal Library of Belgium
Royal Library of Belgium
The Royal Library of Belgium is one of the most important cultural institutions in Belgium. The library has a history that goes back to the age of the Dukes of Burgundy...

 where they are still found. The extensive archives of the Old University are now part of the State Archives in Belgium.

Following the destruction of the library, a new library building was constructed on Ladeuzeplein. It was designed by the American architect Whitney Warren
Whitney Warren
Whitney Warren was an architect with Charles Delevan Wetmore at Warren and Wetmore in New York City.-Biography:He was born in 1864 and his brother was Lloyd Warren, also an architect. He was a cousin of the Vanderbilts and spent ten years at the École des Beaux Arts...

 in a neo-Flemish-Renaissance style, and built between 1921 and 1928. Its monumental size is a reflection of the Allied victory against Germany
Germany
Germany , officially the Federal Republic of Germany , is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe. The country consists of 16 states while the capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal climate...

, and it is one of the largest university buildings in the city. The library's collections were rebuilt with donations from all around the world, outraged by the barbaric act which it had suffered. In 1940, during the second German invasion of Leuven, the building largely burnt down, including its 900,000 manuscripts and books. The blaze is thought to have started in an exchange of fire between the two armies, rather than a deliberate act. The building was rebuilt after the war in accordance with Warren's design.

The library's collections were again restored after the war, and by the fission in 1968 had approximately four million books.
The split of the university into separate French-language and Dutch-language institutions in 1968 entailed a division of the central library holdings. This was done on the basis of alternate shelfmarks (except in cases where a work clearly belonged to one section or the other, e.g. was written by a member of faculty or bequeathed by an alumnus whose linguistic allegiance was clear). This gave rise to the factoid
Factoid
A factoid is a questionable or spurious—unverified, incorrect, or fabricated—statement presented as a fact, but with no veracity. The word can also be used to describe a particularly insignificant or novel fact, in the absence of much relevant context...

 that encyclopedias and runs of periodicals were divided by volume between the two universities, but actually such series bear single shelfmarks.

The building on Ladeuzeplein is now the central library of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.

Notable alumni

For post-1968 alumni, see Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium.It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, and is a prominent part of the city, home to the university since 1425...

 or Université catholique de Louvain
Université catholique de Louvain
The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known, especially in Belgium, as UCL, is Belgium's largest French-speaking university. It is located in Louvain-la-Neuve and in Brussels...

.

  • Jan Standonck
    Jan Standonck
    Jan Standonck was a Dutch priest, Scholastic, and reformer.He was part of the great movement for reform in the 15th century French church. His approach was to reform the recruitment and education of the clergy, along very ascetic lines, heavily influenced by the hermit saint Francis of Paola...

     (1454–1504), priest and reformer, Master of the Collège de Montaigu
    Collège de Montaigu
    The Collège de Montaigu was one of the constituent colleges of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Paris. The college, originally called the Collège des Aicelins, was founded in 1314 by Giles Aicelin, the Archbishop of Rouen...

     in Paris
    Paris
    Paris is the capital and largest city in France, situated on the river Seine, in northern France, at the heart of the Île-de-France region...

    .
  • Adriaan Floriszoon Boeyens (1459–1523), Pope Adrian VI
    Pope Adrian VI
    Pope Adrian VI , born Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, served as Pope from 9 January 1522 until his death some 18 months later...

    .
  • Desiderius Erasmus
    Desiderius Erasmus
    Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus , known as Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, and a theologian....

     (1466–1536), humanist
    Humanism
    Humanism is an approach in study, philosophy, world view or practice that focuses on human values and concerns. In philosophy and social science, humanism is a perspective which affirms some notion of human nature, and is contrasted with anti-humanism....

    .
  • Gerard Mercator (1512–1594), cartographer.
  • Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564), father of modern anatomy
    Anatomy
    Anatomy is a branch of biology and medicine that is the consideration of the structure of living things. It is a general term that includes human anatomy, animal anatomy , and plant anatomy...

    .
  • Rembert Dodoens
    Rembert Dodoens
    Rembert Dodoens was a Flemish physician and botanist, also known under his Latinized name Rembertus Dodonaeus.-Biography:...

     (1517–1585), botanist.
  • Justus Lipsius
    Justus Lipsius
    Justus Lipsius was a Southern-Netherlandish philologist and humanist. Lipsius wrote a series of works designed to revive ancient Stoicism in a form that would be compatible with Christianity. The most famous of these is De Constantia...

     (1547–1606), humanist.
  • Leonardus Lessius
    Leonardus Lessius
    Leonardus Lessius was a Jesuit moral theologian and a pioneer in business ethics.-Life:...

     1554–1623, ethics and economy
  • Cornelius Otto Jansen (1585–1638), father of Jansenism
    Jansenism
    Jansenism was a Christian theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the posthumously published work of the Dutch theologian Cornelius Otto Jansen, who died in 1638...

    .
  • Charles Nerinckx
    Charles Nerinckx
    Rev. Charles Nerinckx was a Roman Catholic missionary priest who migrated from Belgium to work in Kentucky. He founded the Sisters of Loretto religious order.-Early life and education:...

     (1761–1824), founder of Sisters of Loretto
    Sisters of Loretto
    Sisters of Loretto or the Loretto Community is a Catholic religious institution, which, according to their mission statement, "strive[s] to bring the healing Spirit of God into our world" and is committed "to improving the conditions of those who suffer from injustice, oppression, and deprivation...

    .
  • Bernard du Bus de Gisignies
    Bernard du Bus de Gisignies
    Jonkheer Bernard Aimé Léonard du Bus de Gisignies was a Dutch nobleman and later on a Belgian politician, ornithologist and paleontologist. He was the second son of Leonard Pierre Joseph du Bus de Gisignies...

     (1808–1874), law, politician, ornithologist and paleontologist.
  • Hippoliet Van Peene
    Hippoliet van Peene
    Hippoliet Jan van Peene was a Flemish physician and playwright.He studied Medicine at the State university of Louvain and became a physician in Kaprijke and later in Ghent....

     (1811–1864), physician and playwright
    Playwright
    A playwright, also called a dramatist, is a person who writes plays.The term is not a variant spelling of "playwrite", but something quite distinct: the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder...

    , wrote the lyrics of the Flemish anthem "De Vlaamse Leeuw
    De Vlaamse Leeuw
    De Vlaamse Leeuw is the official anthem of Flanders, a region in the federal kingdom of Belgium.-Composition:...

    "
  • Charles-Louis-Joseph-Xavier de la Vallée-Poussin
    Charles-Louis-Joseph-Xavier de la Vallée-Poussin
    Charles-Louis-Joseph-Xavier de la Vallée-Poussin was a Belgian geologist and mineralogist. His son was the mathematician Charles Jean de la Vallée-Poussin.-Academic career:...

     (1827–1903), a mineralogist and geologist
    Geologist
    A geologist is a scientist who studies the solid and liquid matter that constitutes the Earth as well as the processes and history that has shaped it. Geologists usually engage in studying geology. Geologists, studying more of an applied science than a theoretical one, must approach Geology using...

  • Father Patrick Francis Healy
    Patrick Francis Healy
    Patrick Francis Healy was the 29th President of Georgetown University known for expanding the school following the American Civil War. He was accepted as and identified as Irish-American. Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark, was constructed during Healy's tenure and is named after him...

     (1830–1910), 29th president of Georgetown University
    Georgetown University
    Georgetown University is a private, Jesuit, research university whose main campus is in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic university in the United States...

     in the United States, first Jesuit priest of African American
    African American
    African Americans are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa and are the direct descendants of enslaved Africans within the boundaries of the present United States...

     ancestry, first person of acknowledged African-American ancestry to earn PhD
  • Antanas Baranauskas
    Antanas Baranauskas
    Antanas Baranauskas was a Lithuanian poet, mathematician and a catholic bishop of Polish town Sejny. Baranauskas is best known as the author of the Lithuanian language poem Anykščių šilelis. He used various pseudonyms, including A.B., Bangputys, Jurksztas Smalaūsis, Jurkštas Smalaūsis, and Baronas...

     (1835–1902), Polish-Lithuanian poet
    Poet
    A poet is a person who writes poetry. A poet's work can be literal, meaning that his work is derived from a specific event, or metaphorical, meaning that his work can take on many meanings and forms. Poets have existed since antiquity, in nearly all languages, and have produced works that vary...

    .
  • Arthur Vierendeel (1852–1940) civil engineer.
  • Emile Joseph Dillon
    E. J. Dillon
    Emile Joseph Dillon was an author, journalist and linguist.The son of an Irish father and an English mother, Dillon initially trained for the priesthood; however, he abandoned all plans for a career in the church when he was 21, and immersed himself in the study of Oriental languages at the...

     (1854–1933), linguist, author and journalist.
  • Albrecht Rodenbach
    Albrecht Rodenbach
    Albrecht Rodenbach was a Flemish poet, and a leader in the revival of Flemish literature that occurred in the late 19th Century. He is more noteworthy as a symbol of the Flemish movement, than for his actual activities, since he died at the age of 23...

     (1856–1880), poet.
  • Albin van Hoonacker
    Albin van Hoonacker
    Albin-Augustin Van Hoonacker was a Roman Catholic theologian, professor at the Faculty of Theology, Catholic University of Leuven, a member of The Royal Academy of Belgium and Knight of the Order of Leopold.-Life:Albin van Hoonacker came from a respectable middle-class background...

     (1857–1933) Catholic theologian and Biblical scholar
  • Charles Jean de la Vallée-Poussin
    Charles Jean de la Vallée-Poussin
    Charles-Jean Étienne Gustave Nicolas de la Vallée Poussin was a Belgian mathematician. He is most well known for proving the Prime number theorem.The king of Belgium ennobled him with the title of baron.-Biography:...

     (1866–1962), mathematician who proved the prime number theorem
    Prime number theorem
    In number theory, the prime number theorem describes the asymptotic distribution of the prime numbers. The prime number theorem gives a general description of how the primes are distributed amongst the positive integers....

    .
  • Edgar Sengier
    Edgar Sengier
    Edgar Sengier was the director of the Belgian Union Minière du Haut Katanga during World War II. Sengier is credited with giving the American government access to much of the uranium necessary for the Manhattan Project...

     (1879–1963), director of the Union Minière du Haut Katanga
    Union Minière du Haut Katanga
    The Union Minière du Haut Katanga was a Belgian mining company, once operating in Katanga, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo...

    .
  • Frans Van Cauwelaert
    Frans Van Cauwelaert
    Frans van Cauwelaert , was a Belgian Roman Catholic politician and lawyer.Van Cauwelaert was born at Onze-Lieve-Vrouw-Lombeek...

     (1880–1961), politician.
  • Jean-Baptiste Janssens
    Jean-Baptiste Janssens
    Jean-Baptiste Janssens was the twenty-seventh Superior General of the Society of Jesus. He was born in Mechelen, Belgium.-Early Life and schooling:...

    , S.J. (1889–1964), twenty-seventh Superior General of the Society of Jesus
    Society of Jesus
    The Society of Jesus is a Catholic male religious order that follows the teachings of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits, and are also known colloquially as "God's Army" and as "The Company," these being references to founder Ignatius of Loyola's military background and a...

    .
  • Weng Wenhao
    Weng Wenhao
    Weng Wenhao was a Chinese geologist, educator, and paramount politician....

     (1889–1971), founder of modern Chinese geography
    Geography
    Geography is the science that studies the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena of Earth. A literal translation would be "to describe or write about the Earth". The first person to use the word "geography" was Eratosthenes...

    .
  • Georges Lemaître
    Georges Lemaître
    Monsignor Georges Henri Joseph Édouard Lemaître was a Belgian priest, astronomer and professor of physics at the Catholic University of Louvain. He was the first person to propose the theory of the expansion of the Universe, widely misattributed to Edwin Hubble...

     (1894–1966), astronomer
    Astronomer
    An astronomer is a scientist who studies celestial bodies such as planets, stars and galaxies.Historically, astronomy was more concerned with the classification and description of phenomena in the sky, while astrophysics attempted to explain these phenomena and the differences between them using...

    , priest and proposer of the Big Bang
    Big Bang
    The Big Bang theory is the prevailing cosmological model that explains the early development of the Universe. According to the Big Bang theory, the Universe was once in an extremely hot and dense state which expanded rapidly. This rapid expansion caused the young Universe to cool and resulted in...

     theory.
  • Fulton J. Sheen
    Fulton J. Sheen
    Servant of God Fulton John Sheen, born Peter John Sheen was an American archbishop of the Catholic Church known for his preaching and especially his work on television and radio...

     (1895–1979), American archbishop, television personality, and writer.
  • Rafael Ángel Calderón Guardia
    Rafael Ángel Calderón Guardia
    Rafael Ángel del Socorro Calderón Guardia was the president of Costa Rica from 1940 to 1944.-Early life:Calderón was born on 10 March 1900 in San José. In his youth, Calderón studied in Costa Rica and Belgium, where he married Yvonne Clays Spoelders, who was later to be the first female diplomat of...

    , (1900–1970), physician, social reformer, president of Costa Rica
    Costa Rica
    Costa Rica , officially the Republic of Costa Rica is a multilingual, multiethnic and multicultural country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua to the north, Panama to the southeast, the Pacific Ocean to the west and the Caribbean Sea to the east....

     1940–1944
  • Saint Alberto Hurtado
    Alberto Hurtado
    Saint Alberto Hurtado Cruchaga , popularly known in Chile as Padre Hurtado , was a Chilean Jesuit priest, lawyer, social worker and writer of Basque origin, founder of the Hogar de Cristo foundation...

    , (1901–1952), Chilean Jesuit priest, social worker and writer. Canonized in 2005.
  • Victor Delhez
    Victor Delhez
    Victor Delhez, , best known for his engravings, was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and died in Argentina.Delhez was one of seven children...

    , (1902–1985), engraver and artist.
  • Hendrik Elias
    Hendrik Elias
    Hendrik Josef Elias was a Belgian politician and Flemish nationalist.-Biography:Elias was a noted academic, holding doctorates in both Law and Philosophy from studies at the Catholic University of Leuven, the University of Paris and the University of Bonn before serving in a number of leading...

    , (1902–1973), Flemish Nationalist, quisling
    Quisling
    Quisling is a term used in reference to fascist and collaborationist political parties and military and paramilitary forces in occupied Allied countries which collaborated with Axis occupiers in World War II, as well as for their members and other collaborators.- Etymology :The term was coined by...

    .
  • Maurice Anthony Biot
    Maurice Anthony Biot
    Maurice Anthony Biot was a Belgian-American physicist and the founder of the theory of poroelasticity.Born in Antwerp, Belgium, Biot studied at Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium where he received a bachelor's degrees in philosophy , mining engineering and electrical engineering , and...

     (1905–1985), Belgian-American physicist
    Physicist
    A physicist is a scientist who studies or practices physics. Physicists study a wide range of physical phenomena in many branches of physics spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic particles of which all ordinary matter is made to the behavior of the material Universe as a whole...

     and the founder of the theory of poroelasticity.
  • Léon Degrelle
    Léon Degrelle
    Léon Joseph Marie Ignace Degrelle was a Walloon Belgian politician, who founded Rexism and later joined the Waffen SS which were front-line troops in the fight against the Soviet Union...

    , (1906–1994), founder of Rexism
    Rexism
    Rexism was a fascist political movement in the first half of the 20th century in Belgium.It was the ideology of the Rexist Party , officially called Rex, founded in 1930 by Léon Degrelle, a Walloon...

    , quisling
    Quisling
    Quisling is a term used in reference to fascist and collaborationist political parties and military and paramilitary forces in occupied Allied countries which collaborated with Axis occupiers in World War II, as well as for their members and other collaborators.- Etymology :The term was coined by...

    .
  • Jean Charles Snoy et d'Oppuers
    Jean Charles Snoy et d'Oppuers
    Count Jean Charles Snoy et d'Oppuers , son of Baron Thierry Snoy, was a Belgian civil servant, diplomat and Roman Catholic politician for the PSC-CVP...

     (1907–1991), law, diplomat, businessman.
  • Herman Van Breda
    Herman Van Breda
    Herman Leo Van Breda was a Franciscan, philosopher and founder of the Husserl archives at the Higher Institute of Philosophy of the Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium....

     (1911–1974), founder of the Husserl Archives.
  • André Molitor
    André Molitor
    André Molitor , is a former Belgian senior civil servant of the Belgian State and former principal private secretary of King Baudouin I of Belgium from 1961 until 1977...

     (1911–2005), law, private secretary of Baudouin I of Belgium.
  • Otto von Habsburg
    Otto von Habsburg
    Otto von Habsburg , also known by his royal name as Archduke Otto of Austria, was the last Crown Prince of Austria-Hungary from 1916 until the dissolution of the empire in 1918, a realm which comprised modern-day Austria, Hungary, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia,...

     (1912 - 2011), heir to the thrones of Austria-Hungary
    Austria-Hungary
    Austria-Hungary , more formally known as the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council and the Lands of the Holy Hungarian Crown of Saint Stephen, was a constitutional monarchic union between the crowns of the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary in...

    ; politician and writer.
  • Tang Yuhan
    Tang Yuhan
    Tang Yuhan , or Hans Tang, is an eminent doctor and oncologist in Hong Kong. He was the president of Hong Kong Chinese Medical Association and the founder of Tang Fund .-Early years:...

    , (1912 - ), Chinese oncologist.
  • Pieter De Somer
    Pieter De Somer
    Pieter De Somer was a Belgian physician and biologist. He studied medicine from 1935 up to 1942 at the Catholic University of Leuven . He did research and later became a professor at the Department of medicine, where he specialised in microbiology and immunology...

     (1917–1985), first rector
    Rector
    The word rector has a number of different meanings; it is widely used to refer to an academic, religious or political administrator...

     of the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium.It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, and is a prominent part of the city, home to the university since 1425...

    .
  • Christian de Duve
    Christian de Duve
    Christian René, viscount de Duve is a Nobel Prize-winning cytologist and biochemist. De Duve was born in Thames Ditton, Surrey, Great Britain, as a son of Belgian refugees. They returned to Belgium in 1920...

     (1917 - ), Nobel Prize in Medicine
    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine
    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine administered by the Nobel Foundation, is awarded once a year for outstanding discoveries in the field of life science and medicine. It is one of five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, in his will...

     1974, for his discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell
    Cell (biology)
    The cell is the basic structural and functional unit of all known living organisms. It is the smallest unit of life that is classified as a living thing, and is often called the building block of life. The Alberts text discusses how the "cellular building blocks" move to shape developing embryos....

    .
  • Anton van Wilderode
    Anton van Wilderode
    Cyriel Paul Coupé , pseudonym Anton van Wilderode was a Belgian writer and poet.Coupé was born in Moerbeke-Waas. He was ordained as a priest on 21 May 1944, and graduated in Classical philology at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven...

     (1919–1998), Flemish activist and writer.
  • Frans Van Coetsem
    Frans Van Coetsem
    Frans Van Coetsem was a Belgian linguist. After an academic career in Flanders and the Netherlands he was appointed professor at Cornell University in 1968, and consequently he emigrated to the USA, where, after a few years, he chose to become a naturalized American citizen.-Life:Frans Van...

     (1919–2002), linguist.
  • Aster Berkhof
    Lode Van Den Bergh
    Lode Van Den Bergh , pseudonym Aster Berkhof and Piet Visser, is a Belgian writer. He is married to Nora Steyaert. He was born in Rijkevorsel.-Education:...

    , (1920– ), Flemish writer.
  • Charles Mertens de Wilmars
    Charles Mertens de Wilmars
    Charles Mertens de Wilmars was a Belgian psychiatrist. He was a member of the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine, and held the honours of Grand Officer of the Order of Leopold, the Order of the Crown, and Commander of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre.He graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1948,...

     (1921–1994), psychiatrist, professor at Harvard Medical School
    Harvard Medical School
    Harvard Medical School is the graduate medical school of Harvard University. It is located in the Longwood Medical Area of the Mission Hill neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts....

  • Malachi Martin
    Malachi Martin
    Malachi Brendan Martin Ph.D. was a Catholic priest, theologian, writer on the Catholic Church, and professor at the Vatican's Pontifical Biblical Institute. He held three doctorates and was the sole author of sixteen books covering religious and geopolitical topics, which were published in eight...

     (1921–1999), Irish writer.
  • Antoon Vergote (1921 -), Catholic priest, theologian, philosopher, psychologist
    Psychologist
    Psychologist is a professional or academic title used by individuals who are either:* Clinical professionals who work with patients in a variety of therapeutic contexts .* Scientists conducting psychological research or teaching psychology in a college...

     and psychoanalyst (also known as Antoine Vergote).
  • Tomás Ó Fiaich (1923–1990), Archbishop of Armagh.
  • Jan Zaprudnik
    Jan Zaprudnik
    Jan Zaprudnik is an American historian and publicist of Belarusian descent...

     (1924 - ), Belarusian-American historian
    Historian
    A historian is a person who studies and writes about the past and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. If the individual is...

     and poet.
  • Geza Vermes
    Geza Vermes
    Géza Vermes or Vermès is a British scholar of Jewish Hungarian origin and writer on religious history, particularly Jewish and Christian. He is a noted authority on the Dead Sea Scrolls and other ancient works in Aramaic, and on the life and religion of Jesus...

     (1924 - ), religious historian and translator
    Translation
    Translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text. Whereas interpreting undoubtedly antedates writing, translation began only after the appearance of written literature; there exist partial translations of the Sumerian Epic of...

     into English of the Dead Sea Scrolls
    Dead Sea scrolls
    The Dead Sea Scrolls are a collection of 972 texts from the Hebrew Bible and extra-biblical documents found between 1947 and 1956 on the northwest shore of the Dead Sea, from which they derive their name...

    .
  • José J. Fripiat
    José J. Fripiat
    José J. Fripiat is a Belgian scientist and former professor at the Universite Catholique de Louvain. He obtained a M.S. degree in Chemistry and Physics in 1944 at the Universite Catholique de Louvain. He started his career as a "soil physicist" in a research institute located in the Belgian Congo...

    , a chemist, and laureate of the 1967 Francqui Prize
    Francqui Prize
    The Francqui Prize is a prestigious Belgian scholarly and scientific prize, awarded each year since 1933 by the Francqui Foundation in recognition of the achievements of a young Belgian scholar or scientist...

  • Gustavo Gutiérrez
    Gustavo Gutiérrez
    Gustavo Gutiérrez Merino, O.P., is a Peruvian theologian and Dominican priest regarded as the founder of Liberation Theology...

     (1928 - ), Peru
    Peru
    Peru , officially the Republic of Peru , is a country in western South America. It is bordered on the north by Ecuador and Colombia, on the east by Brazil, on the southeast by Bolivia, on the south by Chile, and on the west by the Pacific Ocean....

    vian Dominican
    Dominican Order
    The Order of Preachers , after the 15th century more commonly known as the Dominican Order or Dominicans, is a Catholic religious order founded by Saint Dominic and approved by Pope Honorius III on 22 December 1216 in France...

     theologian, founder of Liberation Theology
    Liberation theology
    Liberation theology is a Christian movement in political theology which interprets the teachings of Jesus Christ in terms of a liberation from unjust economic, political, or social conditions...

    .
  • Michael Hurley
    Michael Hurley (Jesuit)
    Father Michael Hurley, S.J., was an Irish Jesuit priest and theologian, who has been widely called the "father of Irish ecumenism" for promoting Christian unity. Hurley co-founded the Irish School of Ecumenics in 1970 and served as the school's director until 1980.Hurley was born in Ardmore,...

     (1923-2011), Irish Jesuit, co-founder of the Irish School of Ecumenics
    Irish School of Ecumenics
    The Irish School of Ecumenics is a new discipline within an aspirant School at Trinity College Dublin, and existed as an independent entity until negotiating admission to Trinity College about a decade ago. The ISE is dedicated to the promotion of ecumenism, religious reconciliation and interfaith...

  • Adolphe Gesché (1928–2003), theologian
  • Jacques Taminiaux
    Jacques Taminiaux
    Jacques Taminiaux is a Belgian philosopher, since 1989 Professor at Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts . He studied philosophy at the Universite Catholique de Louvain...

     (1928 - ), philosopher, 1977 laureate of the Francqui Prize
    Francqui Prize
    The Francqui Prize is a prestigious Belgian scholarly and scientific prize, awarded each year since 1933 by the Francqui Foundation in recognition of the achievements of a young Belgian scholar or scientist...

  • Camilo Torres
    Camilo Torres Restrepo
    Father Camilo Torres Restrepo was a Colombian socialist, Roman Catholic priest, a predecessor of liberation theology and a member of the National Liberation Army guerrilla organisation...

     (1929–1966), Colombian priest and guerillero.
  • André Goffeau  (1935 - ), scientist participated to the yeast's DNA code discovery.
  • Abdul Qadeer Khan
    Abdul Qadeer Khan
    Abdul Qadeer Khan , also known in Pakistan as Mohsin-e-Pakistan , D.Eng, Sc.D, HI, NI , FPAS; more widely known as Dr. A. Q...

     (1936 - ), Pakistani metallurgist considered to be the father of Pakistan's nuclear weapons program.
  • Jacques van Ypersele de Strihou
    Jacques van Ypersele de Strihou
    Jacques van Ypersele de Strihou , is the Principal Private Secretary to the King of Belgium. When Albert II of Belgium succeeded his brother Baudouin I of Belgium, he kept his private secretary, so Jacques van Ypersele de Strihou has served two kings...

     (1936 - ), private secretary of the King of Belgium.
  • Nguza Karl-i-Bond
    Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond
    Jean Nguza Karl-i-Bond was a prominent Zairian politician.Born in Musumba, Lualaba District, a member of the Lunda tribe and a nephew of the Katangan leader, Moise Tshombe, Nguza was a pock-marked child who rose rapidly through government posts and gained the favour of President Mobutu Sese...

     (1938–2003), notable Zairian
    Zaire
    The Republic of Zaire was the name of the present Democratic Republic of the Congo between 27 October 1971 and 17 May 1997. The name of Zaire derives from the , itself an adaptation of the Kongo word nzere or nzadi, or "the river that swallows all rivers".-Self-proclaimed Father of the Nation:In...

     politician.
  • Baron Piet Van Waeyenberge
    Piet Van Waeyenberge
    Baron Piet Paul August Van Waeyenberge is a Belgian businessman. He is a son of Camille Van Waeyenberge and a brother of Jozef Van Waeyenberge. He was one of the founders, and is currently president, of business club De Warande...

     (1938 - ), economics, President of De Warande
    De Warande (Club)
    De Warande is a Flemish business club, located in Brussels, Belgium. The club was founded in Brussels in 1988, by Flemish businesspeople and the Flemish government. The club wants to bring together distinguished and representative personalities from the Flemish business community...

    .
  • Bernard Lietaer
    Bernard Lietaer
    Bernard Lietaer is an economist, author and professor. He studies monetary systems and promotes the idea that communities can benefit from creating their own local or complementary currency, which circulate parallel with national currencies.Bernard Lietaer, the author of "The Future of Money:...

     (1942 - ), economist and author.
  • Arthur Ulens
    Arthur Ulens
    Arthur Ulens is a Belgian businessman and former head of AGC Flat Glass which groups the worldwide flat glass activities of the Asahi Glass Company .-Education:He graduated in chemistry and economy at the Catholic University of Leuven....

     (1946 - ), chemistry and economics, businessman
  • Afif Safieh
    Afif Safieh
    Afif Safieh is a Palestinian diplomat. He was most recently the Palestinian ambassador to the Russian Federation.Safieh was born in Jerusalem in 1950 to a Christian family. As a child, he attended school in Jerusalem's College Des Frères. In 1972, he obtained a degree in Political Science and...

     (1950 - ), Palestinian diplomat, ambassador to the Russian Federation.
  • Herman Van Den Berghe
    Herman Van Den Berghe
    Herman Van den Berghe is a Belgian pioneer in human genetics. He founded the Centrum voor Menselijke Erfelijkheid at the medical faculty of the Catholic University of Leuven in Leuven , Belgium...

    , founder of the Centrum voor Menselijke Erfelijkheid (Belgian Centre for Human Heredity).
  • Herman Van Rompuy
    Herman Van Rompuy
    Herman Achille Van Rompuy is the first long-term and full-time President of the European Council...

     (1947 - ), Belgian statesman and Prime Minister of Belgium. Appointed as the first President of the European Council
    President of the European Council
    The President of the European Council is a principal representative of the European Union on the world stage, and the person presiding over and driving forward the work of the European Council...

     in November 2009.
  • Jan Lauwereyns
    Jan Lauwereyns
    Jan Lauwereyns , full name Johan Marc José Lauwereyns, is a poet, essayist, and scientist. As a cognitive neuroscientist, he specializes in the voluntary control of attention and decision making. He has published articles in journals such as Nature, Neuron, and Trends in Cognitive Sciences, and the...

     (1969 - ), cognitive neuroscientist, poet
  • Father Robert S. Smith
    Father Robert S. Smith
    Robert S. Smith , the Robert R. Colbert Sr. '48 Catholic Chaplain and Distinguished Scholar at Cornell University, was a Catholic priest, author, and educator. His interests ranged from philosophy and theology to the ethics of medical care to interfaith dialogue...

     (1932–2010), American Catholic priest, author, and educator
  • Renato Prada Oropeza
    Renato Prada Oropeza
    Renato Prada Oropeza was a Bolivian and Mexican scientist-literary researcher and writer, author of novels, short stories and poetry books, hermeneutics, semiotics and literary theory. Many of his literary works have been translated into several languages...

     (1923 - ), Mexican writer and semiologist
    Semiotics
    Semiotics, also called semiotic studies or semiology, is the study of signs and sign processes , indication, designation, likeness, analogy, metaphor, symbolism, signification, and communication...

  • Pierre Laconte
    Pierre Laconte
    Pierre Laconte , is an Belgian urbanist, born in Brussels, Belgium. He specialises in urban transport and architectural planning and environmental issues....

     (1934 - ), a Belgian urbanist

See also

  • Old University of Leuven
    Old University of Leuven
    The Old University of Leuven is the name historians give to the university, or studium generale, founded in Leuven, Brabant , in 1425, and closed in 1797, a week after the cession to the French Republic of the Austrian Netherlands and the principality of Liège by the Treaty of Campo Formio.When...

  • University of Lovanium
    University of Lovanium
    The University of Lovanium was a Catholic Jesuit university in Leopoldville/Leopoldstad in Belgian Congo.-History:The university was established in 1954 at Kimwenza.Its name was derived from the old name, Lovanium, for Leuven in Belgium...

  • Universities in Leuven
    Universities in Leuven
    The city of Leuven, in the former Duchy of Brabant was the seat of three universities and of a universitarian college:*1425: The University of Leuven or Studium Generale Lovaniense or Universitas Studiorum Lovaniensis, was founded by a French prince, Jean de Bourgogne, Duke John IV of Brabant,...

  • Collegium Trilingue
    Collegium Trilingue
    The Collegium Trilingue, often also called Collegium trium linguarum, or, after its creator Collegium Buslidianum , was founded in 1517 under the patronage of the Luxembourgian humanist, Jérôme de Busleyden .The College, in fact inspired by Erasmus who was a friend of...

  • State University of Leuven
    State University of Leuven
    The State University of Leuven a liberal, neutral and non-confessional university founded in 1817 in Leuven, Belgium, which was then part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. It was not a continuation of the former Old University of Leuven, however, a dozen of professors of the Old University...

  • Catholic University of Mechlin
    Catholic University of Mechlin
    The Catholic University of Mechlin was a university that was founded in Mechelen , Belgium, on November 8, 1834 by the bishops of Belgium.The bishops aimed to create a university "to accommodate any doctrine from the Holy Apostolic See and to repudiate anything that does not flow from this august...

  • Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
    The Katholieke Universiteit Leuven is a Dutch-speaking university in Flanders, Belgium.It is located at the centre of the historic town of Leuven, and is a prominent part of the city, home to the university since 1425...

  • Université catholique de Louvain
    Université catholique de Louvain
    The Université catholique de Louvain, sometimes known, especially in Belgium, as UCL, is Belgium's largest French-speaking university. It is located in Louvain-la-Neuve and in Brussels...

  • Academic libraries in Leuven
    Academic libraries in Leuven
    The city of Leuven was not only the seat of three different Universities, but also through them, the seat of prestigious academic libraries.- The Library of the Old University of Leuven :...

  • Leuven Database of Ancient Books
    Leuven Database of Ancient Books
    Leuven Database of Ancient Books , a resource for all ancient documents in the online. It currently lists more than 16.000 Greek, Latin, Coptic, and Demotic literary texts. It "attempts to collect the basic information on all ancient literary texts". It included authors from Homer to Gregory the...

The source of this article is wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
 
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