Ottonian architecture
Overview
 
Ottonian Architecture is an architectural style which evolved during the reign of Emperor Otto the Great (936-975). The style was found in Germany
Germany
Germany , officially the Federal Republic of Germany , is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe. The country consists of 16 states while the capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal climate...

 and lasted from the mid 10th century until the mid 11th century.

Ottonian architecture draws its inspiration from Carolingian
Carolingian architecture
Carolingian architecture is the style of north European Pre-Romanesque architecture belonging to the period of the Carolingian Renaissance of the late 8th and 9th centuries, when the Carolingian family dominated west European politics...

 and Byzantine architecture
Byzantine architecture
Byzantine architecture is the architecture of the Byzantine Empire. The empire gradually emerged as a distinct artistic and cultural entity from what is today referred to as the Roman Empire after AD 330, when the Roman Emperor Constantine moved the capital of the Roman Empire east from Rome to...

. Apart from some examples influenced by the octagonal Palatine Chapel at Aachen such as Ottmarsheim
Ottmarsheim
Ottmarsheim is a commune in the Haut-Rhin department in Alsace in north-eastern France.-References:*...

 (11th century, Alsace) and the apse of the abbey of the Holy Trinity at Essen, religious architecture tends to diverge from the centralised plan.
Encyclopedia
Ottonian Architecture is an architectural style which evolved during the reign of Emperor Otto the Great (936-975). The style was found in Germany
Germany
Germany , officially the Federal Republic of Germany , is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe. The country consists of 16 states while the capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal climate...

 and lasted from the mid 10th century until the mid 11th century.

Ottonian architecture draws its inspiration from Carolingian
Carolingian architecture
Carolingian architecture is the style of north European Pre-Romanesque architecture belonging to the period of the Carolingian Renaissance of the late 8th and 9th centuries, when the Carolingian family dominated west European politics...

 and Byzantine architecture
Byzantine architecture
Byzantine architecture is the architecture of the Byzantine Empire. The empire gradually emerged as a distinct artistic and cultural entity from what is today referred to as the Roman Empire after AD 330, when the Roman Emperor Constantine moved the capital of the Roman Empire east from Rome to...

. Apart from some examples influenced by the octagonal Palatine Chapel at Aachen such as Ottmarsheim
Ottmarsheim
Ottmarsheim is a commune in the Haut-Rhin department in Alsace in north-eastern France.-References:*...

 (11th century, Alsace) and the apse of the abbey of the Holy Trinity at Essen, religious architecture tends to diverge from the centralised plan. Inspiration though from the Roman basilica
Basilica
The Latin word basilica , was originally used to describe a Roman public building, usually located in the forum of a Roman town. Public basilicas began to appear in Hellenistic cities in the 2nd century BC.The term was also applied to buildings used for religious purposes...

 remains concurrent, and Ottonian architecture preserves the Carolingian
Carolingian architecture
Carolingian architecture is the style of north European Pre-Romanesque architecture belonging to the period of the Carolingian Renaissance of the late 8th and 9th centuries, when the Carolingian family dominated west European politics...

 double ended feature with apses at either end of the church.

Examples

  • St Bartholomew's Church, Liège
    St Bartholomew's Church, Liège
    Founded outside the city walls, the Roman Catholic Collegial Church of Saint Bartholemew in Liège, Belgium, was built in coal sandstone, from the late 11th century to the late 12th century , and underwent, like most religious buildings, modifications through the centuries...

    , Belgium.
  • Church of St. Gertrude, Nivelles
    Nivelles
    Nivelles is a Walloon city and municipality located in the Belgian province of Walloon Brabant. The Nivelles municipality includes the old communes of Baulers, Bornival, Thines, and Monstreux....

    , Belgium (1046)
  • Church of St. Michael
    St. Michael's Church, Hildesheim
    The Church of St. Michael in Hildesheim, Germany, is an early-Romanesque church. It has been on the UNESCO World Cultural Heritage list since 1985.-History:...

    , Hildesheim
    Hildesheim
    Hildesheim is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. It is located in the district of Hildesheim, about 30 km southeast of Hanover on the banks of the Innerste river, which is a small tributary of the Leine river...

    , Germany (1010-33)
  • Abbey Church of Gernrode
    Gernrode
    Gernrode is a town and a former municipality in Germany, in the district of Harz, Saxony-Anhalt. The town was first mentioned in 961 and became a city in 1539. Since 1 January 2011, it is part of the town Quedlinburg...

    (959-63, apparently the first in Europe to have the tribune gallery)
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