Institution of Civil Engineers
Overview
 
Founded on 2 January 1818, the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) is an independent professional association, based in central London
London
London is the capital city of :England and the :United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its...

, representing civil engineering
Civil engineering
Civil engineering is a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment, including works like roads, bridges, canals, dams, and buildings...

. Like its early membership, the majority of its current members are British
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

 engineers, but it also has members in more than 150 countries around the world. In 2008, its total membership stands at more than 80,000. In November 2010, Peter Hansford assumed office as the current President.
As a professional body, it is committed to support and promote professional learning (both to students and existing practitioners), managing professional ethics and safeguarding the status of engineers, and representing the interests of the profession in dealings with government, etc.
Encyclopedia
Founded on 2 January 1818, the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) is an independent professional association, based in central London
London
London is the capital city of :England and the :United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its...

, representing civil engineering
Civil engineering
Civil engineering is a professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of the physical and naturally built environment, including works like roads, bridges, canals, dams, and buildings...

. Like its early membership, the majority of its current members are British
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

 engineers, but it also has members in more than 150 countries around the world. In 2008, its total membership stands at more than 80,000. In November 2010, Peter Hansford assumed office as the current President.

Purpose

As a professional body, it is committed to support and promote professional learning (both to students and existing practitioners), managing professional ethics and safeguarding the status of engineers, and representing the interests of the profession in dealings with government, etc. It sets standards for membership of the body; works with industry and academia to progress engineering standards and advises on education and training curricula.

The Institution of Civil Engineers also publishes technical studies covering research and best practice in civil engineering. Under its commercial arm, Thomas Telford Ltd, it delivers training, recruitment, publishing and contract services, such as the NEC Engineering and Construction Contract
NEC Engineering and Construction Contract
The New Engineering Contract , or NEC Engineering and Construction Contract is a formalized system created by the Institution of Civil Engineers that guides the drafting of documents on civil engineering and construction projects for the purpose of obtaining tenders, awarding and administering...

. All the profits of Thomas Telford Ltd go back to the Institution to further its stated aim of putting civil engineers at the heart of society. The publishing division has existed since 1836 and is today called ICE Publishing. ICE Publishing produces roughly 30 books a year, including the ICE Manuals series, and 26 civil engineering journals, including the ICE Proceedings in eighteen parts, Géotechnique, and the Magazine of Concrete Research. The ICE Science series is now also published by ICE Publishing. ICE Science currently consists of three journals: Nanomaterials and Energy, Emerging Materials Research and Bioinspired, Biomimetic and Nanobiomaterials. ICE members, except for students, also receive the weekly New Civil Engineer
New Civil Engineer
New Civil Engineer is the weekly magazine of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the UK chartered body that oversees the practice of civil engineering in the UK. It is published by EMAP who acquired the title and editorial control from the ICE in 1995...

magazine. However, this is not published by ICE Publishing, but by Emap
EMAP
Emap Limited is a British media company, specialising in the production of business-to-business magazines, and the organisation of business events and conferences...

.

Students pursuing recognised academic courses in civil engineering can join the ICE as student members - many undergraduate civil, structural and environmental degrees in the UK are "accredited by the ICE". After completing their studies, individuals can become graduate members – a step closer to achieving full Member status (MICE). The pinnacle of professional standing is to then be accepted as a Fellow (FICE).

Origins

The late 18th century and early 19th century saw the founding of many learned societies and professional bodies (for example, the Royal Society
Royal Society
The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, known simply as the Royal Society, is a learned society for science, and is possibly the oldest such society in existence. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a Royal Charter by King Charles II as the "Royal Society of London"...

 and the Law Society
Law society
A Law Society in current and former Commonwealth jurisdictions was historically an association of solicitors with a regulatory role that included the right to supervise the training, qualifications and conduct of lawyers/solicitors...

). Groups calling themselves civil engineers had been meeting for some years from the late 18th century, notably the Society of Civil Engineers
Smeatonian Society of Civil Engineers
The Smeatonian Society of Civil Engineers was founded in 1771, and was originally known as the Society of Civil Engineers, being renamed following its founder's death...

 formed in 1771 by John Smeaton
John Smeaton
John Smeaton, FRS, was an English civil engineer responsible for the design of bridges, canals, harbours and lighthouses. He was also a capable mechanical engineer and an eminent physicist...

 (renamed the Smeatonian Society after his death). At that time, formal engineering in Britain was limited to the military engineers of the Corps of Royal Engineers
Royal Engineers
The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers , and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army....

, and in the spirit of self help prevalent at the time and to provide a focus for the fledgling 'civilian engineers', the Institution of Civil Engineers was founded as the world's first professional engineering body.

The initiative to found the Institution was taken in 1818 by three young engineers, Henry Robinson Palmer
Henry Robinson Palmer
Henry Robinson Palmer was a British civil engineer who designed the world's first monorail system and the first elevated railsystem...

 (23), James Jones (28) and Joshua Field
Joshua Field (engineer)
Joshua Field was a British civil engineer and mechanical engineer.Field was born in Hackney in 1786, his father was John Field a corn and seed merchant who was later to become Master of the Worshipful Company of Merchant Taylors...

 (32), who organised an inaugural meeting on 2 January 1818, at the Kendal Coffee House in Fleet Street
Fleet Street
Fleet Street is a street in central London, United Kingdom, named after the River Fleet, a stream that now flows underground. It was the home of the British press until the 1980s...

. The institution made little headway until a key step was taken - the appointment of Thomas Telford
Thomas Telford
Thomas Telford FRS, FRSE was a Scottish civil engineer, architect and stonemason, and a noted road, bridge and canal builder.-Early career:...

 as the first President of the body. Greatly respected within the profession and blessed with numerous contacts across the industry and in government circles, he was instrumental in drumming up membership and getting a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

 for ICE in 1828. This official recognition helped establish ICE as the pre-eminent organisation for engineers of all disciplines.

The objects of such institution, as recited in the charter, were
After Telford’s death in 1834, the organisation moved into premises in Great George Street in the heart of Westminster
Westminster
Westminster is an area of central London, within the City of Westminster, England. It lies on the north bank of the River Thames, southwest of the City of London and southwest of Charing Cross...

 in 1839, and began to publish learned papers on engineering topics. Its members, notably William Cubitt
William Cubitt
Sir William Cubitt was an eminent English civil engineer and millwright. Born in Norfolk, England, he was employed in many of the great engineering undertakings of his time. He invented a type of windmill sail and the prison treadwheel, and was employed as chief engineer, at Ransomes of Ipswich,...

, were also prominent in the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851.

In some respects ICE was ahead of its time, providing a focus for engineers from other disciplines. Mechanical engineer and tool-maker Henry Maudslay
Henry Maudslay
Henry Maudslay was a British machine tool innovator, tool and die maker, and inventor. He is considered a founding father of machine tool technology.-Early life:...

 was an early member and Joseph Whitworth
Joseph Whitworth
Sir Joseph Whitworth, 1st Baronet was an English engineer, entrepreneur, inventor and philanthropist. In 1841, he devised the British Standard Whitworth system, which created an accepted standard for screw threads...

 presented one of the earliest papers – it was not until 1847 that the Institution of Mechanical Engineers
Institution of Mechanical Engineers
The Institution of Mechanical Engineers is the British engineering society based in central London, representing mechanical engineering. It is licensed by the Engineering Council UK to assess candidates for inclusion on ECUK's Register of professional Engineers...

 was established (with George Stephenson
George Stephenson
George Stephenson was an English civil engineer and mechanical engineer who built the first public railway line in the world to use steam locomotives...

 as its first President).

By the end of the 19th century, ICE had introduced examinations for professional engineering qualifications to help ensure and maintain high standards among its members – a role it continues today.

The ICE's Great George Street headquarters, designed by James Miller
James Miller (architect)
James Miller was a Scottish architect and artist. He is noted for his many buildings in Glasgow and for his Scottish railway stations. Among these are the heavily American-influenced Union Bank building at 110-20 St Vincent Street; his 1901-1905 extensions to Glasgow Central railway station; and...

, was built by John Mowlem & Co
Mowlem
Mowlem was one of the largest construction and civil engineering companies in the United Kingdom. Carillion bought the firm in 2006.-History:Founded by John Mowlem in 1822, the company was awarded a Royal Warrant in 1902 and went public on the London Stock Exchange in 1924. It acquired SGB Group in...

 and completed in 1913.

Former ICE Presidents

Many of the profession’s greatest engineers have served as President of the ICE including:
  • Thomas Telford
    Thomas Telford
    Thomas Telford FRS, FRSE was a Scottish civil engineer, architect and stonemason, and a noted road, bridge and canal builder.-Early career:...

     (1820-1834 – the post later became a biennial and then annual accolade)
  • James Walker
    James Walker (engineer)
    James Walker, FRS, was an influential Scottish civil engineer of the first half of the 19th century.Walker was born in Falkirk and was apprenticed to his uncle Ralph Walker in approximately 1800, with whom he gained experience working on the design and construction of the West India and East India...

     (1835–45)
  • Sir John Rennie
    John Rennie (son)
    Sir John Rennie was the second son of engineer John Rennie and brother of George Rennie.-Early life:...

     (1845–48)
  • Sir William Cubitt
    William Cubitt
    Sir William Cubitt was an eminent English civil engineer and millwright. Born in Norfolk, England, he was employed in many of the great engineering undertakings of his time. He invented a type of windmill sail and the prison treadwheel, and was employed as chief engineer, at Ransomes of Ipswich,...

     (1849–1851)
  • James Meadows Rendel
    James Meadows Rendel
    James Meadows Rendel FRS was a British civil engineer.-Early life & career:Rendel, the son of a farmer and surveyor, was born near Okehampton, Devon, in 1799. He was initiated into the operations of a millwright under an uncle at Teignmouth, while from his father he learnt the rudiments of civil...

     (1852–53)
  • Robert Stephenson
    Robert Stephenson
    Robert Stephenson FRS was an English civil engineer. He was the only son of George Stephenson, the famed locomotive builder and railway engineer; many of the achievements popularly credited to his father were actually the joint efforts of father and son.-Early life :He was born on the 16th of...

     (1855–57)
  • Joseph Locke
    Joseph Locke
    Joseph Locke was a notable English civil engineer of the 19th century, particularly associated with railway projects...

     (1857–59)
  • John Robinson McClean
    John Robinson McClean
    John Robinson McClean CB FRS , was a British civil engineer and Liberal Party politician.-Early life:He was born in Belfast. Educated at Belfast Academical Institution and University of Glasgow.-Engineering career:...

     (1863–65)
  • Sir John Fowler
    John Fowler (engineer)
    Sir John Fowler, 1st Baronet KCMG LLD was an English civil engineer specialising in the construction of railways and railway infrastructure. In the 1850s and 1860s, he was engineer for the world's first underground railway, London's Metropolitan Railway, built by the "cut-and-cover" method under...

     (1867)
  • Thomas Hawksley
    Thomas Hawksley
    Thomas Hawksley was an English civil engineer of the 19th century, particularly associated with water and gas engineering projects.The son of John Hawksley and Mary Whittle, and born in Arnold, near Nottingham on , Hawksley was largely self-taught from the age of 15 onwards, having at that point...

     (1873)
  • William Henry Barlow
    William Henry Barlow
    On 28 December 1879, the central section of the North British Railway's bridge across the River Tay near Dundee collapsed in the Tay Bridge disaster as an express train crossed it in a heavy storm. All 75 passengers and crew on the train were killed...

     (1880)
  • Sir Joseph Bazalgette
    Joseph Bazalgette
    Sir Joseph William Bazalgette, CB was an English civil engineer of the 19th century. As chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works his major achievement was the creation of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while...

     (1882–84)
  • Sir John Coode
    John Coode (engineer)
    Sir John Coode , English civil engineer, was born at Bodmin, Cornwall, the son of a solicitor. After considerable experience as an engineer in the west of England he came to London, and from 1844 to 1847 had a consulting practice in Westminster.In the latter year he was appointed resident engineer...

     (1889–91)
  • Sir John Wolfe-Barry
    John Wolfe-Barry
    Sir John Wolfe-Barry was an English civil engineer of the late 19th and early 20th century. His most famous project was the construction of Tower Bridge over the River Thames in London.-Early career:...

     (1898)
  • James Mansergh (1900)
  • Sir Guilford Lindsey Molesworth
    Guilford Lindsey Molesworth
    Sir Guilford Lindsey Molesworth KCIE was an English civil engineer.He was educated at the college of civil engineers at Putney, then became chief assistant engineer of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, but soon resigned to conduct the constructions at the Royal Arsenal, Woolwich,...

     (1905)
  • Sir Alexander Binnie
    Alexander Binnie
    Sir Alexander Richardson Binnie was a civil engineer responsible for several major engineering projects, including several associated with crossings of the River Thames in London....

     (1906)
  • Sir Basil Mott
    Basil Mott
    Sir Basil Mott, 1st Baronet FRS was one of the most notable English civil engineers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was responsible for some of the most innovative work on tunnels and bridges in the United Kingdom in the 40-year period centred on World War I.Basil Mott was born in...

     (1925)
  • Sir Alexander Gibb
    Alexander Gibb
    Brigadier-General Sir Alexander Gibb GBE CB FRS was a Scottish civil engineer.Gibb was born in Broughty Ferry, Dundee, the son of the civil engineer, Alexander Easton Gibb, and the grandson of John Gibb, a founder member of the Institution of Civil Engineers...

     (1937)
  • Sir William Halcrow
    William Halcrow
    Sir William Halcrow was one of the most notable English civil engineers of the 20th century, particularly renowned for his expertise in the design of tunnels and for projects during the Second World War.-Early years:...

     (1946–47)


One of Britain's greatest engineers, Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS , was a British civil engineer who built bridges and dockyards including the construction of the first major British railway, the Great Western Railway; a series of steamships, including the first propeller-driven transatlantic steamship; and numerous important bridges...

 died before he could take up the post (he was vice-president from 1850).

Presidents have been blogging since Gordon Masterton's year (2005 to 2006). The blog of the current president is on the web site of the Institution of Civil Engineers here.http://www.ice.org.uk/News-Public-Affairs/ICE-Blog/December-2010/ICE-President-s-blog--Starting-to-deliver-value

Awards

The Institution makes a series of awards to recognise the work of its members. In addition to awards for technical papers, reports and competition entries it awards a number of medals for different achievements.

Gold Medal

The Gold Medal is awarded to an individual who has made valuable contributions to civil engineering over many years. This may cover contributions in one or more areas, such as, design, research, development, investigation, construction, management (including project management), education and training.

Garth Watson Medal

The Garth Watson Medal is awarded for dedicated and valuable service to ICE by an ICE Member or member of staff.

Brunel Medal

The Brunel Medal is awarded to teams, individiuals or organisations operating within the built environment and recognises excellence in civil engineering.

Edmund Hambly Medal

The Edmund Hambly Medal awarded for creative design in an engineering project that makes a substantial contribution to sustainable development. It is awarded to projects, of any scale, which take into account such factors as full life-cycle effects, including de-commissioning, and show an understanding of the implications of infrastructure impact upon the environment. The medal is awarded in honour of past president Edmund Hambly
Edmund Hambly
Dr Edmund Cadbury Hambly was a British structural engineer.Edmund Hambly was born in Seer Green, near Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire in 1942. He went at Eton College prior to studying the engineering tripos at Cambridge University. He excelled there gaining a first class honours degree and claiming...

 who was a proponent of sustainable engineering.

International Medal

The International Medal is awarded annually to a civil engineer who has made an outstanding contribution to civil engineering outside the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

 or an engineer who resides outside the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

.

Warren Medal

The Warren Medal is awarded annually to an ICE member in recognition of valuable services to his or her region.

Telford Medal

The Telford Medal
Telford Medal
The Telford Medal is the highest prize awarded by the British Institution of Civil Engineers for a paper, or series of papers, in the field of engineering. It was introduced in 1835 following a bequest made by Thomas Telford, the ICE's first president....

is the highest prize that can be awarded by the ICE for a paper.

External links

The source of this article is wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.  The text of this article is licensed under the GFDL.
 
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