Elizabeth Bowen
Overview
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen, CBE
CBE
CBE and C.B.E. are abbreviations for "Commander of the Order of the British Empire", a grade in the Order of the British Empire.Other uses include:* Chemical and Biochemical Engineering...

 (7 June 1899 – 22 February 1973) was an Irish novelist and short story writer.
Elizabeth Bowen was born on 7 June 1899 at 15 Herbert Place in Dublin, Ireland
Ireland
Ireland is an island to the northwest of continental Europe. It is the third-largest island in Europe and the twentieth-largest island on Earth...

 and was baptized in the nearby St Stephen's Church on Upper Mount Street. Her parents Henry Charles Cole Bowen and Florence Colley Bowen later brought her to Bowen's Court at Farahy, near Kildorrery
Kildorrery
Kildorrery is a village in north County Cork, Ireland. It lies at the crossroads of the N73 road from Mallow to Mitchelstown and the R512 from Kilmallock to Fermoy....

, County Cork
County Cork
County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

 where she spent her summers.
Quotations

Fate is not an eagle, it creeps like a rat.

This is the worst of love, this unmeant mystification — someone smiling and going out without saying where, or a letter arriving, being read in your presence, put away, not explained, or: "No, alas, I can't to-night" on the telephone — that, one person having set up without knowing, the other cannot undo without the where? who? why? that brings them both down a peg. Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies.

And yet in a way I would rather fail point blank. Things one can do have no value. I don't mind feeling small myself, but I dread finding the world is.

Experience isn't interesting until it begins to repeat itself - in fact, till it does that, it hardly is experience.

Encyclopedia
Elizabeth Dorothea Cole Bowen, CBE
CBE
CBE and C.B.E. are abbreviations for "Commander of the Order of the British Empire", a grade in the Order of the British Empire.Other uses include:* Chemical and Biochemical Engineering...

 (7 June 1899 – 22 February 1973) was an Irish novelist and short story writer.

Life

Elizabeth Bowen was born on 7 June 1899 at 15 Herbert Place in Dublin, Ireland
Ireland
Ireland is an island to the northwest of continental Europe. It is the third-largest island in Europe and the twentieth-largest island on Earth...

 and was baptized in the nearby St Stephen's Church on Upper Mount Street. Her parents Henry Charles Cole Bowen and Florence Colley Bowen later brought her to Bowen's Court at Farahy, near Kildorrery
Kildorrery
Kildorrery is a village in north County Cork, Ireland. It lies at the crossroads of the N73 road from Mallow to Mitchelstown and the R512 from Kilmallock to Fermoy....

, County Cork
County Cork
County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

 where she spent her summers. When her father became mentally ill in 1907, she and her mother moved to England, eventually settling in Hythe
Hythe, Kent
Hythe , is a small coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the District of Shepway on the south coast of Kent. The word Hythe or Hithe is an Old English word meaning Haven or Landing Place....

. After her mother died in 1912, Bowen was brought up by her aunts. She was educated at Downe House School, under the headship of Olive Willis
Olive Willis
Olive Margaret Willis was an English educationist and headmistress. She founded Downe House School and was its head for nearly forty years, from 1907 to 1946.-Early life:...

. After some time at art school in London she decided that her talent lay in writing. She mixed with the Bloomsbury Group
Bloomsbury Group
The Bloomsbury Group or Bloomsbury Set was a group of writers, intellectuals, philosophers and artists who held informal discussions in Bloomsbury throughout the 20th century. This English collective of friends and relatives lived, worked or studied near Bloomsbury in London during the first half...

, becoming good friends with Rose Macaulay
Rose Macaulay
Dame Emilie Rose Macaulay, DBE was an English writer. She published thirty-five books, mostly novels but also biographies and travel writing....

, who helped her find a publisher for her first book, a collection of short stories entitled Encounters (1923).

In 1923 she married Alan Cameron, an educational administrator who subsequently worked for the BBC
BBC
The British Broadcasting Corporation is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters is at Broadcasting House in the City of Westminster, London. It is the largest broadcaster in the world, with about 23,000 staff...

. The marriage has been described as "a sexless but contented union". She had various extra-marital relationships, including one with Charles Ritchie
Charles Ritchie
Charles Stewart Almon Ritchie, CC was a Canadian diplomat and diarist.Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, he was Canada’s ambassador to West Germany , Permanent Representative to the United Nations , ambassador to the United States during the presidencies of John F...

, a Canadian diplomat seven years her junior, which lasted over thirty years. She also had an affair with the Irish writer Seán Ó Faoláin
Seán Ó Faoláin
Seán Proinsias Ó Faoláin was an Irish short story writer. He was elected Saoi of Aosdána in 1986.Born as John Francis Whelan in Cork City, County Cork, Ireland, Sean Ó Faoláin wrote his first stories in the 1920s. Through 90 stories, written over a period of 60 years, Ó Faoláin charts the...

 and a relationship with the American poet May Sarton
May Sarton
May Sarton is the pen name of Eleanore Marie Sarton , an American poet, novelist, and memoirist.-Biography:...

. Bowen and her husband first lived near Oxford
Oxford
The city of Oxford is the county town of Oxfordshire, England. The city, made prominent by its medieval university, has a population of just under 165,000, with 153,900 living within the district boundary. It lies about 50 miles north-west of London. The rivers Cherwell and Thames run through...

, where they socialized with Maurice Bowra
Maurice Bowra
Sir Cecil Maurice Bowra was an English classical scholar and academic, known for his wit. He was Warden of Wadham College, Oxford, from 1938 to 1970, and served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford from 1951 to 1954.-Birth and boyhood:...

, John Buchan and Susan Buchan, and where she wrote her early novels, including The Last September
The Last September
The Last September is a novel by the Anglo-Irish writer Elizabeth Bowen published in 1929, concerning life at the country mansion of Danielstown, Cork during the Irish War of Independence.-Plot summary:Preface...

(1929). Following the publication of To the North (1932) they moved to 2 Clarence Terrace, Regent's Park
Regent's Park
Regent's Park is one of the Royal Parks of London. It is in the north-western part of central London, partly in the City of Westminster and partly in the London Borough of Camden...

, London
London
London is the capital city of :England and the :United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its...

 where Bowen would go on to write The House in Paris
The House in Paris
The House in Paris is Elizabeth Bowen's fifth novel. First published in 1935, it was well received by critics past and present, and praised by Virginia Woolf and A. S. Byatt...

(1935) and The Death of the Heart
The Death of the Heart
The Death of the Heart is a 1938 novel by Elizabeth Bowen set between the two world wars. It is about a sixteen year old orphan, Portia Quayne, who moves to London to live with her half-brother Thomas and falls in love with Eddie, a friend of her sister-in-law.-Plot summary:At the beginning of the...

(1938).

In 1930, Bowen was the first woman to inherit Bowen's Court, but remained based in England, making frequent visits to Ireland. During World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

 she worked for the British Ministry of Information, reporting on Irish opinion, particularly on the issue of Irish neutrality. Bowen's political views tended towards Burkean conservatism
Conservatism
Conservatism is a political and social philosophy that promotes the maintenance of traditional institutions and supports, at the most, minimal and gradual change in society. Some conservatives seek to preserve things as they are, emphasizing stability and continuity, while others oppose modernism...

. During and after the war she wrote among the greatest expressions of life in wartime London, The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945) and The Heat of the Day
The Heat of the Day
The Heat of the Day is a novel written by Elizabeth Bowen, first published in 1948 in Great Britain, and in 1949 in the United States of America....

(1948). She was awarded the CBE
CBE
CBE and C.B.E. are abbreviations for "Commander of the Order of the British Empire", a grade in the Order of the British Empire.Other uses include:* Chemical and Biochemical Engineering...

 in 1948.

Her husband retired in 1952 and they settled in Bowen’s Court, where Alan Cameron died a few months later. Since inheriting it many writers had visited her at Bowen's Court, including Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

, Eudora Welty
Eudora Welty
Eudora Alice Welty was an American author of short stories and novels about the American South. Her novel The Optimist's Daughter won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973. Welty was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, among numerous awards. She was the first living author to have her works published...

, Carson McCullers
Carson McCullers
Carson McCullers was an American writer. She wrote novels, short stories, and two plays, as well as essays and some poetry. Her first novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter explores the spiritual isolation of misfits and outcasts of the South...

, and Iris Murdoch
Iris Murdoch
Dame Iris Murdoch DBE was an Irish-born British author and philosopher, best known for her novels about political and social questions of good and evil, sexual relationships, morality, and the power of the unconscious...

. For years Bowen struggled to keep the house going, lecturing in the United States to earn money. In 1957 her portrait was painted at Bowen's Court by her friend Patrick Hennessy
Patrick Hennessy (painter)
Patrick Hennessy, RHA was an Irish painter.- Life and Work :Patrick Hennessy was born in Cork, Ireland in 1915. The son of army officer John Hennessy, of 2 Shandon Terrace, and Bridget Hennessy he moved with his family, in the 1920s, to live in Scotland where they had many relations...

. She traveled to Italy
Italy
Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

 in 1958 to research and prepare A Time in Rome (1960) but by the following year Bowen was forced to sell her beloved Bowen's Court. It was demolished in 1960. After spending some years without a permanent home, Bowen finally settled in 'Carbery', Church Hill, Hythe in 1965.
Her final novel Eva Trout, or Changing Scenes
Eva Trout (novel)
Eva Trout is Elizabeth Bowen's final novel and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 1970. First published in 1968, it is about a young woman—the eponymous heroine—who, abandoned by her mother just after her birth, raised by nurses and nannies and educated by governesses all hired...

(1968) won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize
James Tait Black Memorial Prize
Founded in 1919, the James Tait Black Memorial Prizes are among the oldest and most prestigious book prizes awarded for literature written in the English language and are Britain's oldest literary awards...

 in 1969 and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize
Man Booker Prize
The Man Booker Prize for Fiction is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-length novel, written in the English language, by a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland, or Zimbabwe. The winner of the Man Booker Prize is generally assured of international renown and...

 in 1970. Subsequently, she was among the judges (with her friend Cyril Connolly
Cyril Connolly
Cyril Vernon Connolly was an English intellectual, literary critic and writer. He was the editor of the influential literary magazine Horizon and wrote Enemies of Promise , which combined literary criticism with an autobiographical exploration of why he failed to become the successful author of...

) that awarded the 1972 Man Booker Prize to John Berger
John Berger
John Peter Berger is an English art critic, novelist, painter and author. His novel G. won the 1972 Booker Prize, and his essay on art criticism Ways of Seeing, written as an accompaniment to a BBC series, is often used as a university text.-Education:Born in Hackney, London, England, Berger was...

 for G. She spent Christmas of 1972 at Kinsale
Kinsale
Kinsale is a town in County Cork, Ireland. Located some 25 km south of Cork City on the coast near the Old Head of Kinsale, it sits at the mouth of the River Bandon and has a population of 2,257 which increases substantially during the summer months when the tourist season is at its peak and...

, County Cork with her friends Major Stephen Vernon and Lady Ursula Vernon (daughter of the Duke of Westminster
Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster
Hugh Richard Arthur Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster GCVO DSO was the son of Victor Alexander Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor and Lady Sibell Mary Lumley, the daughter of the 9th Earl of Scarborough...

) but was hospitalized upon her return home. Here she was visited by Isaiah Berlin
Isaiah Berlin
Sir Isaiah Berlin OM, FBA was a British social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas of Russian-Jewish origin, regarded as one of the leading thinkers of the twentieth century and a dominant liberal scholar of his generation...

, Cyril Connolly, Ursula Vernon, Rosamund Lehmann, her literary agent Spencer Curtis Brown, and Charles Ritchie.

Elizabeth Bowen died of lung cancer in a London hospital on 22 February 1973, aged 73. She is buried with her husband in Farahy churchyard, close to the gates of Bowen’s Court. There is a memorial plaque to the author (which bears the words of John Sparrow
John Hanbury Angus Sparrow
John Sparrow was an English academic, barrister, book-collector and Warden of All Souls College, Oxford from 1952-77.-Early life and education:...

) in the entrance to St. Colman's Church at Farahy, where a commemoration of her life is held annually.

In 1977, Victoria Glendinning
Victoria Glendinning
The Hon. Victoria Glendinning, CBE , is a British biographer, critic, broadcaster and novelist; she is President of English PEN, a winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, was awarded a CBE in 1998 and is Vice-President of the Royal Society of Literature.- Biography :She was born in Sheffield...

 published the first biography on Elizabeth Bowen. In 2009 Glendinning published a book about the relationship between Ritchie and Bowen, based on his diaries and her letters to him.

Themes

Elizabeth Bowen was greatly interested in ‘life with the lid on and what happens when the lid comes off,’ in the innocence of orderly life, and in the eventual, irrepressible forces that transform experience. Bowen also examined the betrayal and secrets that lie beneath the veneer of respectability. The style of her works is highly wrought and owes much to literary modernism. She was an admirer of film and influenced by the filmmaking techniques of her day. The locations in which Bowen's works are set often bear heavily on the psychology of the characters and on the plots. Bowen's war novel The Heat of the Day
The Heat of the Day
The Heat of the Day is a novel written by Elizabeth Bowen, first published in 1948 in Great Britain, and in 1949 in the United States of America....

(1949) is considered one of the quintessential depictions of London atmosphere during the bombing raids of World War II.

Novels

  • The Hotel (1927)
  • The Last September
    The Last September
    The Last September is a novel by the Anglo-Irish writer Elizabeth Bowen published in 1929, concerning life at the country mansion of Danielstown, Cork during the Irish War of Independence.-Plot summary:Preface...

    (1929)
  • Friends and Relations (1931)
  • To the North (1932)
  • The House in Paris
    The House in Paris
    The House in Paris is Elizabeth Bowen's fifth novel. First published in 1935, it was well received by critics past and present, and praised by Virginia Woolf and A. S. Byatt...

    (1935)
  • The Death of the Heart
    The Death of the Heart
    The Death of the Heart is a 1938 novel by Elizabeth Bowen set between the two world wars. It is about a sixteen year old orphan, Portia Quayne, who moves to London to live with her half-brother Thomas and falls in love with Eddie, a friend of her sister-in-law.-Plot summary:At the beginning of the...

    (1938)
  • The Heat of the Day
    The Heat of the Day
    The Heat of the Day is a novel written by Elizabeth Bowen, first published in 1948 in Great Britain, and in 1949 in the United States of America....

    (1949)
  • A World of Love (1955)
  • The Little Girls (1964)
  • Eva Trout
    Eva Trout (novel)
    Eva Trout is Elizabeth Bowen's final novel and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 1970. First published in 1968, it is about a young woman—the eponymous heroine—who, abandoned by her mother just after her birth, raised by nurses and nannies and educated by governesses all hired...

    (1968)

Short Stories and Collections

  • Encounters (1923)
  • Ann Lee's and Other Stories (1926)
  • Joining Charles and Other Stories (1929)
  • The Cat Jumps and Other Stories (1934)
  • "The Easter Egg Party" (1938) in The London Mercury
    London Mercury
    The London Mercury was the name of several periodicals published in London from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. The earliest was a newspaper that appeared during the Exclusion Bill crisis; it lasted only 56 issues...

  • Look At All Those Roses (1941)
  • The Demon Lover and Other Stories (1945)
  • Ivy Gripped the Steps and Other Stories (1946, USA)
  • Stories by Elizabeth Bowen (1959)
  • A Day in the Dark and Other Stories (1965)
  • The Good Tiger (1965, children's book) - illustrated by M. Nebel (1965 edition) and Quentin Blake
    Quentin Blake
    Quentin Saxby Blake, CBE, FCSD, RDI, is an English cartoonist, illustrator and children's author, well-known for his collaborations with writer Roald Dahl.-Education:...

     (1970 edition)
  • Elizabeth Bowen’s Irish Stories (1978)
  • The Collected Stories of Elizabeth Bowen (1980)
  • The Bazaar and Other Stories (2008) - edited by Allan Hepburn

Non-fiction books

  • Bowen's Court (1942, 1964)
  • Seven Winters: Memories of a Dublin Childhood (1942)
  • English Novelists (1942)
  • Anthony Trollope: A New Judgement (1946)
  • Why Do I Write?: An Exchange of Views between Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene and V.S. Pritchett (1948)
  • Collected Impressions (1950)
  • The Shelbourne (1951)
  • A Time in Rome (1960)
  • Afterthought: Pieces About Writing (1962)
  • Pictures and Conversations (1975) - edited by Spencer Curtis Brown
  • The Mulberry Tree: Writings of Elizabeth Bowen (1999) - edited by Hermione Lee
  • "Notes On Éire": Espionage Reports to Winston Churchill by Elizabeth Bowen, 1940-1942 (2008) - edited by Jack Lane and Brendan Clifford
  • People, Places, Things: Essays by Elizabeth Bowen (2008) - edited by Allan Hepburn
  • Love's Civil War: Elizabeth Bowen and Charles Ritchie: Letters and Diaries, 1941-1973 (2009) - edited by Victoria Glendinning and Judith Robertson
  • Listening In: Broadcasts, Speeches, and Interviews by Elizabeth Bowen (2010) - edited by Allan Hepburn
  • Elizabeth Bowen's Selected Irish Writings (2011) - edited by Éibhear Walshe

Critical Studies of Bowen

  • Jocelyn Brooke: Elizabeth Bowen (1952)
  • William Heath: Elizabeth Bowen: An Introduction to Her Novels (1961)
  • Edwin J. Kenney: Elizabeth Bowen (1975)
  • Victoria Glendinning
    Victoria Glendinning
    The Hon. Victoria Glendinning, CBE , is a British biographer, critic, broadcaster and novelist; she is President of English PEN, a winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, was awarded a CBE in 1998 and is Vice-President of the Royal Society of Literature.- Biography :She was born in Sheffield...

    : Elizabeth Bowen: Portrait of a Writer (1977)
  • Hermione Lee
    Hermione Lee
    Hermione Lee, CBE is President of Wolfson College, Oxford and was lately Goldsmiths' Professor of English Literature in the University of Oxford and Professorial Fellow of New College. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Literature.-Biography:Hermione Lee grew up in...

    : Elizabeth Bowen: An Estimation (1981)
  • Patricia Craig: Elizabeth Bowen (1986)
  • Harold Bloom
    Harold Bloom
    Harold Bloom is an American writer and literary critic, and is Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University. He is known for his defense of 19th-century Romantic poets, his unique and controversial theories of poetic influence, and his prodigious literary output, particularly for a literary...

     (editor): Elizabeth Bowen (1987)
  • Allan E. Austin: Elizabeth Bowen (1989)
  • Phyllis Lassner: Elizabeth Bowen (1990)
  • Phyllis Lassner: Elizabeth Bowen: A Study of the Short Fiction (1991)
  • Heather Bryant Jordan: How Will the Heart Endure?: Elizabeth Bowen and the Landscape of War (1992)
  • Andrew Bennett and Nicholas Royle: Elizabeth Bowen and the Dissolution of the Novel: Still Lives (1994)
  • Renée C. Hoogland: Elizabeth Bowen: A Reputation in Writing (1994)
  • Éibhear Walshe (editor): Elizabeth Bowen Remembered: The Farahy Addresses (1998)
  • John D. Coates: Social Discontinuity in the Novels of Elizabeth Bowen: The Conservative Quest (1998)
  • Lis Christensen: Elizabeth Bowen: The Later Fiction (2001)
  • Maud Ellmann: Elizabeth Bowen: The Shadow Across the Page (2003)
  • Neil Corcoran: Elizabeth Bowen: The Enforced Return (2004)
  • Éibhear Walshe (editor): Elizabeth Bowen: Visions and Revisions (2008)
  • Susan Osborn (editor): Elizabeth Bowen: New Critical Perspectives (2009)
  • Éibhear Walshe (editor): Elizabeth Bowen: Selected Irish Writings (2011)

Critical Essays on Bowen

  • The Bellman (Seán Ó Faoláin
    Seán Ó Faoláin
    Seán Proinsias Ó Faoláin was an Irish short story writer. He was elected Saoi of Aosdána in 1986.Born as John Francis Whelan in Cork City, County Cork, Ireland, Sean Ó Faoláin wrote his first stories in the 1920s. Through 90 stories, written over a period of 60 years, Ó Faoláin charts the...

    ): "Meet Elizabeth Bowen" in The Bell
    The Bell (magazine)
    The Bell Magazine Dublin, Ireland. A monthly magazine of literature and social comment which had a seminal influence on a generation of Irish intellectuals.- History :...

    Vol. 4 (September 1942)
  • David Daiches: "The Novels of Elizabeth Bowen" in The English Journal Vol. 38, No. 6 (1949)
  • Elizabeth Hardwick: "Elizabeth Bowen’s Fiction" in Partisan Review Vol. 16 (1949)
  • Bruce Harkness: "The Fiction of Elizabeth Bowen" in The English Journal Vol. 44, No. 9 (1955)
  • Gary T. Davenport: "Elizabeth Bowen and the Big House" in Southern Humanities Review Vol. 8 (1974)
  • Martha McGowan: "The Enclosed Garden in Elizabeth Bowen’s A World of Love" in Éire-Ireland Vol. 16, Issue 1 (Spring 1981)
  • Seán Ó Faoláin
    Seán Ó Faoláin
    Seán Proinsias Ó Faoláin was an Irish short story writer. He was elected Saoi of Aosdána in 1986.Born as John Francis Whelan in Cork City, County Cork, Ireland, Sean Ó Faoláin wrote his first stories in the 1920s. Through 90 stories, written over a period of 60 years, Ó Faoláin charts the...

    : "A Reading and Remembrance of Elizabeth Bowen" in London Review of Books (4-17 March 1982)
  • Antoinette Quinn: "Elizabeth Bowen’s Irish Stories: 1939-45" in Studies in Anglo-Irsh Literature (1982)
  • Harriet S. Chessman: "Women and Language in the Fiction of Elizabeth Bowen" in Twentieth Century Literature Vol. 29, No. 1 (1983)
  • Brad Hooper: "Elizabeth Bowen’s 'The Happy Autumn Fields': A Dream or Not?" in Studies in Short Fiction Vol. 21 (1984)
  • Margaret Scanlan: "Rumors of War: Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September and J. G. Farrell’s Troubles in Éire-Ireland Vol. 20, Issue 2 (Summer 1985)
  • Phyllis Lassner: "The Past is a Burning Pattern: Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September" in Éire-Ireland Vol. 21, Issue 1 (Spring 1986)
  • John Coates: "Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September: The Loss of the Past and the Modern Consciousness" in Durham University Journal, Vol. LXXXII, No. 2 (1990)
  • Roy F. Foster
    R. F. Foster (historian)
    Robert Fitzroy Foster FBA FRHistS FRSL - generally known as Roy Foster - is the Carroll Professor of Irish History at Hertford College, Oxford in the UK.-Background and education:...

    : "The Irishness of Elizabeth Bowen" in Paddy & Mr Punch: Connections in Irish and English History (1993)
  • John Halperin: "The Good Tiger: Elizabeth Bowen" in Eminent Georgians: The Lives of King George V, Elizabeth Bowen, St. John Philby, and Nancy Astor (1995)
  • Declan Kiberd
    Declan Kiberd
    Declan Kiberd is an Irish writer and scholar. He is known for his literary criticism of Irish literature in Irish and English, and his contributions to public cultural life....

    : "Elizabeth Bowen: The Dandy in Revolt" in Éibhear Walshe: Sex, Nation and Dissent in Irish Writing (1997)
  • Carmen Concilio: “Things that Do Speak in Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September” in Moments of Moment: Aspects of the Literary Epiphany edited by Wim Tigges (1999)
  • Neil Corcoran: “Discovery of a Lack: History and Ellipsis in Elizabeth Bowen’s The Last September” in Irish University Review Vol. 31, No. 2 (2001)
  • Elizabeth Cullingford: "'Something Else': Gendering Onliness in Elizabeth Bowen's Early Fiction" in MFS Modern Fiction Studies Vol. 53, No. 2 (2007)
  • Elizabeth C. Inglesby: "'Expressive Objects': Elizabeth Bowen's Narrative Materializes" in MFS Modern Fiction Studies Vol. 53, No. 2 (2007)
  • Brook Miller: “The Impersonal Personal: Value, Voice, and Agency in Elizabeth Bowen's Literary and Social Criticism” in Modern Fiction Studies, Vol. 53, No. 2 (Summer 2007)
  • Sinéad Mooney: “Unstable Compounds: Bowen's Beckettian Affinities” in Modern Fiction Studies, Vol. 53, No. 2 (Summer 2007)
  • Victoria Stewart: "'That Eternal Now': Memory and Subjectivity in Elizabeth Bowen's Seven Winters" in MFS Modern Fiction Studies Vol. 53, No. 2 (2007)
  • Keri Walsh: "Elizabeth Bowen, Surrealist" in Éire-Ireland Vol. 42, No. 3-4 (2007)
  • Heather Bryant Jordan: "A Bequest of Her Own: The Reinvention of Elizabeth Bowen" in New Hibernia Review Vol. 12, No. 2 (2008)
  • Céline Magot: "Elizabeth Bowen’s London in The Heat of the Day: An Impression of the City in the Territory of War" in Literary London (2008)
  • Éibhear Walshe: "No abiding city." The Dublin Review No. 36 (2009)
  • Jessica Gildersleeve: "An Unnameable Thing: Spectral Shadows in Elizabeth Bowen’s The Hotel and The Last September" in Perforations
  • John D. Coates: "The Misfortunes of Eva Trout" in Essays in Criticism 48.1 (1998)
  • Patricia J. Smith: "'Everything to Dread from the Dispossessed': Changing Scenes and the End of the Modernist Heroine in Elizabeth Bowen's Eva Trout" in Hecate 35.1/2 (2009)
  • James F. Wurtz: "Elizabeth Bowen, Modernism, and the Spectre of Anglo-Ireland" in Estudios Irlandeses No. 5 (2010)
  • Patrick W. Moran: "Elizabeth Bowen's Toys and the Imperatives of Play" in Éire-Ireland Vol. 46, Issue 1&2 (Spring/Summer 2011)
  • Kathryn Johnson:"'Phantasmagoric Hinterlands': Adolescence and Anglo-Ireland in Elizabeth Bowen’s The House in Paris and The Death of the Heart" in Irish Women Writers: New Critical Perspectives, ed. Elke d’Hoker, et al. (2011)
  • Tina O’Toole: "Unregenerate Spirits: The Counter-Cultural Experiments of George Egerton and Elizabeth Bowen" in Irish Women Writers: New Critical Perspectives, ed. Elke d’Hoker, et al. (2011)

Television and Film Adaptations

  • The House in Paris (BBC, 1959) starring Pamela Brown, Trader Faulkner, Clare Austin and Vivienne Bennett
  • The Heat of the Day
    The Heat of the Day
    The Heat of the Day is a novel written by Elizabeth Bowen, first published in 1948 in Great Britain, and in 1949 in the United States of America....

    (Granada Television, 1989) starring Patricia Hodge
    Patricia Hodge
    Patricia Ann Hodge is an English actor.-Early life:The daughter of the Royal Hotel owner/manager Eric and his wife Marion , Hodge attended Wintringham Girls' Grammar School on Weelsby Avenue in Grimsby and then St...

    , Michael Gambon
    Michael Gambon
    Sir Michael John Gambon, CBE is an Irish actor who has worked in theatre, television and film. A highly respected theatre actor, Gambon is recognised for his roles as Philip Marlowe in the BBC television serial The Singing Detective, as Jules Maigret in the 1990s ITV serial Maigret, and as...

    , Michael York
    Michael York (actor)
    Michael York, OBE is an English actor.-Early life:York was born in Fulmer, Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, the son of Florence Edith May , a musician; and Joseph Gwynne Johnson, a Llandovery born Welsh ex-Royal Artillery British Army officer and executive with Marks and Spencer department stores...

    , Peggy Ashcroft
    Peggy Ashcroft
    Dame Peggy Ashcroft, DBE was an English actress.-Early years:Born as Edith Margaret Emily Ashcroft in Croydon, Ashcroft attended the Woodford School, Croydon and the Central School of Speech and Drama...

     and Imelda Staunton
    Imelda Staunton
    Imelda Mary Philomena Bernadette Staunton, OBE is an English actress. She is perhaps best known for her performances in the British comedy television series Up the Garden Path, the Harry Potter film series and Vera Drake...

  • The Last September
    The Last September
    The Last September is a novel by the Anglo-Irish writer Elizabeth Bowen published in 1929, concerning life at the country mansion of Danielstown, Cork during the Irish War of Independence.-Plot summary:Preface...

    (1999) starring Maggie Smith
    Maggie Smith
    Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE , better known as Maggie Smith, is an English film, stage, and television actress who made her stage debut in 1952 and is still performing after 59 years...

    , Michael Gambon
    Michael Gambon
    Sir Michael John Gambon, CBE is an Irish actor who has worked in theatre, television and film. A highly respected theatre actor, Gambon is recognised for his roles as Philip Marlowe in the BBC television serial The Singing Detective, as Jules Maigret in the 1990s ITV serial Maigret, and as...

    , Fiona Shaw
    Fiona Shaw
    Fiona Shaw, CBE is an Irish actress and theatre director. Although to international audiences she is probably most familiar for her minor role as Petunia Dursley in the Harry Potter films, she is an accomplished classical actress...

    , Jane Birkin
    Jane Birkin
    Jane Mallory Birkin, OBE is an English-born actress and singer who lives in France. In recent years she has written her own album, directed a film and become an outspoken proponent of democracy in Burma.- Early life :...

    , Lambert Wilson
    Lambert Wilson
    Lambert Wilson is a French actor. He is internationally known for his portrayal of The Merovingian in The Matrix He was born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, the son of Georges Wilson, who was an actor, theatrical manager and director of the Theatre National de Paris.Wilson screen tested for The...

    , David Tennant
    David Tennant
    David Tennant is a Scottish actor. In addition to his work in theatre, including a widely praised Hamlet, Tennant is best known for his role as the tenth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who, along with the title role in the 2005 TV serial Casanova and as Barty Crouch, Jr...

    , Richard Roxburgh
    Richard Roxburgh
    Richard Roxburgh is an Australian actor who has starred in many Australian films and has appeared in supporting roles in a number of Hollywood productions, usually as villains.-Early life:...

     and Keeley Hawes
    Keeley Hawes
    Keeley Hawes is an English actress and model, known for many television roles. She is best known for her roles as Zoe Reynolds in Spooks and Alex Drake in Ashes to Ashes and Lady Agnes in the remake of Upstairs, Downstairs...


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