Circular motion
Overview
 
In physics
Physics
Physics is a natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through spacetime, along with related concepts such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves.Physics is one of the oldest academic...

, circular motion is rotation
Rotation
A rotation is a circular movement of an object around a center of rotation. A three-dimensional object rotates always around an imaginary line called a rotation axis. If the axis is within the body, and passes through its center of mass the body is said to rotate upon itself, or spin. A rotation...

 along a circular path
Circle
A circle is a simple shape of Euclidean geometry consisting of those points in a plane that are a given distance from a given point, the centre. The distance between any of the points and the centre is called the radius....

 or a circular orbit
Orbit
In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in space, for example the orbit of a planet around the center of a star system, such as the Solar System...

. It can be uniform
Uniform circular motion
In physics, uniform circular motion describes the motion of a body traversing a circular path at constant speed. The distance of the body from the axis of rotation remains constant at all times. Though the body's speed is constant, its velocity is not constant: velocity, a vector quantity, depends...

, that is, with constant angular rate of rotation (and thus constant speed), or non-uniform
Non-uniform circular motion
Non-uniform circular motion is any case in which an object moving in a circular path has a varying speed. Some examples of non-uniform circular motion include a roller coaster, a vertical pendulum, and a car riding over a hill. All of these situations include an object traveling at different...

, that is, with a changing rate of rotation. The rotation around a fixed axis
Rotation around a fixed axis
Rotation around a fixed axis is a special case of rotational motion. The fixed axis hypothesis exclude the possibility of a moving axis, and cannot describe such phenomena as wobbling or precession. According to Euler's rotation theorem, simultaneous rotation around more than one axis at the same...

 of a three-dimensional body involves circular motion of its parts. The equations describing circular motion of an object do not take size or geometry into account, rather, the motion of a point mass in a plane is assumed.
Encyclopedia
In physics
Physics
Physics is a natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through spacetime, along with related concepts such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves.Physics is one of the oldest academic...

, circular motion is rotation
Rotation
A rotation is a circular movement of an object around a center of rotation. A three-dimensional object rotates always around an imaginary line called a rotation axis. If the axis is within the body, and passes through its center of mass the body is said to rotate upon itself, or spin. A rotation...

 along a circular path
Circle
A circle is a simple shape of Euclidean geometry consisting of those points in a plane that are a given distance from a given point, the centre. The distance between any of the points and the centre is called the radius....

 or a circular orbit
Orbit
In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in space, for example the orbit of a planet around the center of a star system, such as the Solar System...

. It can be uniform
Uniform circular motion
In physics, uniform circular motion describes the motion of a body traversing a circular path at constant speed. The distance of the body from the axis of rotation remains constant at all times. Though the body's speed is constant, its velocity is not constant: velocity, a vector quantity, depends...

, that is, with constant angular rate of rotation (and thus constant speed), or non-uniform
Non-uniform circular motion
Non-uniform circular motion is any case in which an object moving in a circular path has a varying speed. Some examples of non-uniform circular motion include a roller coaster, a vertical pendulum, and a car riding over a hill. All of these situations include an object traveling at different...

, that is, with a changing rate of rotation. The rotation around a fixed axis
Rotation around a fixed axis
Rotation around a fixed axis is a special case of rotational motion. The fixed axis hypothesis exclude the possibility of a moving axis, and cannot describe such phenomena as wobbling or precession. According to Euler's rotation theorem, simultaneous rotation around more than one axis at the same...

 of a three-dimensional body involves circular motion of its parts. The equations describing circular motion of an object do not take size or geometry into account, rather, the motion of a point mass in a plane is assumed. In practice, the center of mass
Center of mass
In physics, the center of mass or barycenter of a system is the average location of all of its mass. In the case of a rigid body, the position of the center of mass is fixed in relation to the body...

 of a body can be considered to undergo circular motion.

Examples of circular motion include: an artificial satellite orbiting the Earth in geosynchronous orbit
Geosynchronous orbit
A geosynchronous orbit is an orbit around the Earth with an orbital period that matches the Earth's sidereal rotation period...

, a stone which is tied to a rope and is being swung in circles (cf. hammer throw
Hammer throw
The modern or Olympic hammer throw is an athletic throwing event where the object is to throw a heavy metal ball attached to a wire and handle. The name "hammer throw" is derived from older competitions where an actual sledge hammer was thrown...

), a racecar turning through a curve in a race track
Race track
A race track is a purpose-built facility for racing of animals , automobiles, motorcycles or athletes. A race track may also feature grandstands or concourses. Some motorsport tracks are called speedways.A racetrack is a permanent facility or building...

, an electron moving perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field
Magnetic field
A magnetic field is a mathematical description of the magnetic influence of electric currents and magnetic materials. The magnetic field at any given point is specified by both a direction and a magnitude ; as such it is a vector field.Technically, a magnetic field is a pseudo vector;...

, and a gear
Gear
A gear is a rotating machine part having cut teeth, or cogs, which mesh with another toothed part in order to transmit torque. Two or more gears working in tandem are called a transmission and can produce a mechanical advantage through a gear ratio and thus may be considered a simple machine....

 turning inside a mechanism.

Circular motion is accelerated even if the angular rate of rotation is constant, because the object's velocity vector is constantly changing direction. Such change in direction of velocity involves acceleration
Acceleration
In physics, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity with time. In one dimension, acceleration is the rate at which something speeds up or slows down. However, since velocity is a vector, acceleration describes the rate of change of both the magnitude and the direction of velocity. ...

 of the moving object by a centripetal force
Centripetal force
Centripetal force is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: it is always directed orthogonal to the velocity of the body, toward the instantaneous center of curvature of the path. The mathematical description was derived in 1659 by Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens...

, which pulls the moving object toward the center of the circular orbit. Without this acceleration, the object would move in a straight line, according to Newton's laws of motion
Newton's laws of motion
Newton's laws of motion are three physical laws that form the basis for classical mechanics. They describe the relationship between the forces acting on a body and its motion due to those forces...

.

Formulas for uniform circular motion

For motion in a circle of radius
Radius
In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any line segment from its center to its perimeter. By extension, the radius of a circle or sphere is the length of any such segment, which is half the diameter. If the object does not have an obvious center, the term may refer to its...

 r, the circumference of the circle is C = 2π r. If the period for one rotation is T, the angular rate of rotation, also known as angular velocity, ω is:
The speed of the object traveling the circle is:
The angle θ swept out in a time t is:
The acceleration due to change in the direction is:

The vector relationships are shown in Figure 1. The axis of rotation is shown as a vector Ω perpendicular to the plane of the orbit and with a magnitude ω = dθ / dt. The direction of Ω is chosen using the right-hand rule
Right-hand rule
In mathematics and physics, the right-hand rule is a common mnemonic for understanding notation conventions for vectors in 3 dimensions. It was invented for use in electromagnetism by British physicist John Ambrose Fleming in the late 19th century....

. With this convention for depicting rotation, the velocity is given by a vector cross product
Cross product
In mathematics, the cross product, vector product, or Gibbs vector product is a binary operation on two vectors in three-dimensional space. It results in a vector which is perpendicular to both of the vectors being multiplied and normal to the plane containing them...

 as


which is a vector perpendicular to both Ω and r ( t ), tangential to the orbit, and of magnitude ω r. Likewise, the acceleration is given by


which is a vector perpendicular to both Ω and v ( t ) of magnitude ω |v| = ω2 r and directed exactly opposite to r ( t ).

Constant speed

In the simplest case the speed, mass and radius are constant.

Consider a body of one kilogram, moving in a circle of radius
Radius
In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any line segment from its center to its perimeter. By extension, the radius of a circle or sphere is the length of any such segment, which is half the diameter. If the object does not have an obvious center, the term may refer to its...

 one metre, with an angular velocity
Angular velocity
In physics, the angular velocity is a vector quantity which specifies the angular speed of an object and the axis about which the object is rotating. The SI unit of angular velocity is radians per second, although it may be measured in other units such as degrees per second, revolutions per...

 of one radian
Radian
Radian is the ratio between the length of an arc and its radius. The radian is the standard unit of angular measure, used in many areas of mathematics. The unit was formerly a SI supplementary unit, but this category was abolished in 1995 and the radian is now considered a SI derived unit...

 per second
Second
The second is a unit of measurement of time, and is the International System of Units base unit of time. It may be measured using a clock....

.
  • The speed
    Speed
    In kinematics, the speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity ; it is thus a scalar quantity. The average speed of an object in an interval of time is the distance traveled by the object divided by the duration of the interval; the instantaneous speed is the limit of the average speed as...

     is one metre per second.
  • The inward acceleration
    Acceleration
    In physics, acceleration is the rate of change of velocity with time. In one dimension, acceleration is the rate at which something speeds up or slows down. However, since velocity is a vector, acceleration describes the rate of change of both the magnitude and the direction of velocity. ...

     is one metre per square second.
  • It is subject to a centripetal force
    Centripetal force
    Centripetal force is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: it is always directed orthogonal to the velocity of the body, toward the instantaneous center of curvature of the path. The mathematical description was derived in 1659 by Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens...

     of one kilogram metre per square second, which is one newton.
  • The momentum
    Momentum
    In classical mechanics, linear momentum or translational momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object...

     of the body is one kg·m·s−1.
  • The moment of inertia
    Moment of inertia
    In classical mechanics, moment of inertia, also called mass moment of inertia, rotational inertia, polar moment of inertia of mass, or the angular mass, is a measure of an object's resistance to changes to its rotation. It is the inertia of a rotating body with respect to its rotation...

     is one kg·m2.
  • The angular momentum
    Angular momentum
    In physics, angular momentum, moment of momentum, or rotational momentum is a conserved vector quantity that can be used to describe the overall state of a physical system...

     is one kg·m2·s−1.
  • The kinetic energy
    Kinetic energy
    The kinetic energy of an object is the energy which it possesses due to its motion.It is defined as the work needed to accelerate a body of a given mass from rest to its stated velocity. Having gained this energy during its acceleration, the body maintains this kinetic energy unless its speed changes...

     is 1/2 joule
    Joule
    The joule ; symbol J) is a derived unit of energy or work in the International System of Units. It is equal to the energy expended in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one metre , or in passing an electric current of one ampere through a resistance of one ohm for one second...

    .
  • The circumference
    Circumference
    The circumference is the distance around a closed curve. Circumference is a special perimeter.-Circumference of a circle:The circumference of a circle is the length around it....

     of the orbit
    Orbit
    In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in space, for example the orbit of a planet around the center of a star system, such as the Solar System...

     is 2π
    Pi
    ' is a mathematical constant that is the ratio of any circle's circumference to its diameter. is approximately equal to 3.14. Many formulae in mathematics, science, and engineering involve , which makes it one of the most important mathematical constants...

     (~ 6.283) metres.
  • The period of the motion is 2π seconds per turn
    Turn (geometry)
    A turn is an angle equal to a 360° or 2 radians or \tau radians. A turn is also referred to as a revolution or complete rotation or full circle or cycle or rev or rot....

    .
  • The frequency
    Frequency
    Frequency is the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit time. It is also referred to as temporal frequency.The period is the duration of one cycle in a repeating event, so the period is the reciprocal of the frequency...

     is (2π)−1 hertz
    Hertz
    The hertz is the SI unit of frequency defined as the number of cycles per second of a periodic phenomenon. One of its most common uses is the description of the sine wave, particularly those used in radio and audio applications....

    .
  • From the point of view of quantum mechanics
    Quantum mechanics
    Quantum mechanics, also known as quantum physics or quantum theory, is a branch of physics providing a mathematical description of much of the dual particle-like and wave-like behavior and interactions of energy and matter. It departs from classical mechanics primarily at the atomic and subatomic...

    , the system is in an excited state having quantum number ~ 9.48×1035.


Then consider a body of mass
Mass
Mass can be defined as a quantitive measure of the resistance an object has to change in its velocity.In physics, mass commonly refers to any of the following three properties of matter, which have been shown experimentally to be equivalent:...

 m, moving in a circle of radius r, with an angular velocity
Angular velocity
In physics, the angular velocity is a vector quantity which specifies the angular speed of an object and the axis about which the object is rotating. The SI unit of angular velocity is radians per second, although it may be measured in other units such as degrees per second, revolutions per...

 of ω
Omega
Omega is the 24th and last letter of the Greek alphabet. In the Greek numeric system, it has a value of 800. The word literally means "great O" , as opposed to omicron, which means "little O"...

.
  • The speed is v = r·ω.
  • The centripetal (inward) acceleration is a = r·ω 2 = r −1·v 2.
  • The centripetal force is F = m·a = r·m·ω 2 = r−1·m·v 2.
  • The momentum of the body is p = m·v = r·m·ω.
  • The moment of inertia is I = r 2·m.
  • The angular momentum is L = r·m·v = r 2·m·ω = I·ω.
  • The kinetic energy is E = 2−1·m·v 2 = 2−1·r 2·m·ω 2 = (2·m)−1·p 2 = 2−1·I·ω 2 = (2·I)−1·L 2 .
  • The circumference of the orbit
    Orbit
    In physics, an orbit is the gravitationally curved path of an object around a point in space, for example the orbit of a planet around the center of a star system, such as the Solar System...

     is 2·π·r.
  • The period of the motion is T = 2·π·ω −1.
  • The frequency is f = T −1 . (Frequency is also often denoted by the Greek letter
    Nu (letter)
    Nu , is the 13th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals it has a value of 50...

    , which however is almost indistinguishable from the letter v used here for velocity).
  • The quantum number is J = 2·π·L h−1

Description of circular motion using polar coordinates

During circular motion the body moves on a curve that can be described in polar coordinate system
Polar coordinate system
In mathematics, the polar coordinate system is a two-dimensional coordinate system in which each point on a plane is determined by a distance from a fixed point and an angle from a fixed direction....

 as a fixed distance R from the center of the orbit taken as origin, oriented at an angle θ (t) from some reference direction. See Figure 2. The displacement vector is the radial vector from the origin to the particle location:

where is the unit vector parallel to the radius vector at time t and pointing away from the origin. It is handy to introduce the unit vector orthogonal to as well, namely . It is customary to orient to point in the direction of travel along the orbit.

The velocity is the time derivative of the displacement:


Because the radius of the circle is constant, the radial component of the velocity is zero. The unit vector has a time-invariant magnitude of unity, so as time varies its tip always lies on a circle of unit radius, with an angle θ the same as the angle of . If the particle displacement rotates through an angle dθ in time dt, so does , describing an arc on the unit circle of magnitude dθ. See the unit circle at the left of Figure 2. Hence:


where the direction of the change must be perpendicular to (or, in other words, along ) because any change d in the direction of would change the size of . The sign is positive, because an increase in dθ implies the object and have moved in the direction of .
Hence the velocity becomes:

The acceleration of the body can also be broken into radial and tangential components. The acceleration is the time derivative of the velocity:


The time derivative of is found the same way as for . Again, is a unit vector and its tip traces a unit circle with an angle that is π/2 + θ. Hence, an increase in angle dθ by implies traces an arc of magnitude dθ, and as is orthogonal to , we have:


where a negative sign is necessary to keep orthogonal to . (Otherwise, the angle between and would decrease with increase in dθ.) See the unit circle at the left of Figure 2. Consequently the acceleration is:


The centripetal acceleration
Centripetal force
Centripetal force is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: it is always directed orthogonal to the velocity of the body, toward the instantaneous center of curvature of the path. The mathematical description was derived in 1659 by Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens...

 is the radial component, which is directed radially inward:
while the tangential component changes the magnitude of the velocity:

Using complex numbers

Circular motion can be described using complex number
Complex number
A complex number is a number consisting of a real part and an imaginary part. Complex numbers extend the idea of the one-dimensional number line to the two-dimensional complex plane by using the number line for the real part and adding a vertical axis to plot the imaginary part...

s. Let the axis be the real axis and the axis be the imaginary axis. The position of the body can then be given as , a complex "vector":
where is the imaginary unit
Imaginary unit
In mathematics, the imaginary unit allows the real number system ℝ to be extended to the complex number system ℂ, which in turn provides at least one root for every polynomial . The imaginary unit is denoted by , , or the Greek...

, and
is the angle of the complex vector with the real axis and is a function of time t.
Since the radius is constant:
where a dot indicates time differentiation.
With this notation the velocity becomes:
and the acceleration becomes:


The first term is opposite to the direction of the displacement vector and the second is perpendicular to it, just like the earlier results shown before.

External links


See also

  • Angular momentum
    Angular momentum
    In physics, angular momentum, moment of momentum, or rotational momentum is a conserved vector quantity that can be used to describe the overall state of a physical system...

  • Equations of motion for circular motion
  • Pendulum (mathematics)
    Pendulum (mathematics)
    The mathematics of pendulums are in general quite complicated. Simplifying assumptions can be made, which in the case of a simple pendulum allows the equations of motion to be solved analytically for small-angle oscillations.- Simple gravity pendulum :...

  • Reciprocating motion
    Reciprocating motion
    Reciprocating motion, also called reciprocation, is a repetitive up-and-down or back-and-forth motion. It is found in a wide range of mechanisms, including reciprocating engines and pumps. The two opposite motions that comprise a single reciprocation cycle are called strokes...


  • Uniform circular motion
    Uniform circular motion
    In physics, uniform circular motion describes the motion of a body traversing a circular path at constant speed. The distance of the body from the axis of rotation remains constant at all times. Though the body's speed is constant, its velocity is not constant: velocity, a vector quantity, depends...

  • Simple harmonic motion
    Simple harmonic motion
    Simple harmonic motion can serve as a mathematical model of a variety of motions, such as the oscillation of a spring. Additionally, other phenomena can be approximated by simple harmonic motion, including the motion of a simple pendulum and molecular vibration....

  • Example: circular motion

  • Centripetal force
    Centripetal force
    Centripetal force is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: it is always directed orthogonal to the velocity of the body, toward the instantaneous center of curvature of the path. The mathematical description was derived in 1659 by Dutch physicist Christiaan Huygens...

  • Fictitious force
    Fictitious force
    A fictitious force, also called a pseudo force, d'Alembert force or inertial force, is an apparent force that acts on all masses in a non-inertial frame of reference, such as a rotating reference frame....

  • Non-uniform circular motion
    Non-uniform circular motion
    Non-uniform circular motion is any case in which an object moving in a circular path has a varying speed. Some examples of non-uniform circular motion include a roller coaster, a vertical pendulum, and a car riding over a hill. All of these situations include an object traveling at different...

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